08-19-2012, 09:58 AM
#1
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It was brought to my attention to keep my head out of a noose that I had better pay attention to USPS shipping guidelines. For me this suggestion was a good thing. For folks outside the USA not so good. It also may slow down some deliveries.

The short story is I can no longer ship bay rum outside the US. There is a sticker I need to put on it to ship inside the US, but there is no possibility of legal shipping across borders. I never should have done it in the past.

Sorry Gents!

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 08-19-2012, 10:18 AM
#2
  • beartrap
  • Resident Цирюльник
  • Southern California
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That sucks for non US buyers, they would really be missing out on the great product.
Brian, is this an option to ship it to a wholesaler across the pond by ship or there are still restrictions?

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 08-19-2012, 10:50 AM
#3
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Can you get an alcohol vendor license or piggyback off of someone else's?

I'm assuming it's the alcohol that is the issue.

http://www.ups.com/content/gb/en/about/n...holuk.html

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 08-19-2012, 10:59 AM
#4
  • krissy
  • Active Member
  • Cando, North Dakota
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Shipping UPS is going to be a lot more expensive than shipping USPS.

Even an alcohol vendor license (I think are spendy) wouldn't help the issue of shipping first class or priority mail (by air) because those rules are set by the US postal service.

This also applies to others selling cologne (similar products) via BST, they need to be packaged a certain way and mailed parcel post. It has to do with the flashpoint of the product mailed.

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 08-19-2012, 11:03 AM
#5
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Clearly the man wants to keep you down... or something like that.

It's funny though; I can order pretty much anything from anywhere without running into trouble with anyone but the Norwegian Customs people, but you can't ship a great product abroad so us foreigners can enjoy it... or at least enjoy fighting with local custom officials over it Undecided

What changed?

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 08-19-2012, 11:08 AM
#6
  • krissy
  • Active Member
  • Cando, North Dakota
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(08-19-2012, 11:03 AM)WegianWarrior Wrote: What changed?

I think the postal rules changed a number of years ago when an airplane (with passengers) went down and crashed because there was a package being mailed that contained air tanks (or something similar) that wasn't properly labeled. Since then they look at the flammability of package. Many commercial passenger airlines also transport USPS mail domestic and international. However parcel post goes by ground truck or boat for international.

Quote:http://pe.usps.com/text/pub52/pub52c3_004.htm
Full responsibility rests with the mailer to comply with all Postal Service and non–Postal Service laws and regulations in the mailing of hazardous material (DMM 601.10.5). Anyone who mails, or causes to be mailed, a nonmailable or improperly packaged hazardous material can be subject to legal penalties (i.e., fines and/or imprisonment), including but not limited to, those specified in 18 U.S.C. The transport of hazardous materials prior to entry as U.S. Mail and after receipt from the Postal Service is subject to DOT regulations.
The bigger question is... is it worth it?
This has come up on the soaping forums and i'm thinking the fine could be as high as 5k, so more than a slap on the wrist and said not to do it again.

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 08-19-2012, 11:19 AM
#7
  • slantman
  • Expert Shaver
  • Leesburg, Florida
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The only solution is Brian will have to have a satellite factory overseasBiggrin

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 08-19-2012, 11:30 AM
#8
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He could ship it without the alcohol and you guys could mix it over there.

I think....

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 08-19-2012, 12:21 PM
#9
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(08-19-2012, 11:30 AM)asharperrazor Wrote: He could ship it without the alcohol and you guys could mix it over there.

I think....

That is a funny idea Laughing1

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 08-19-2012, 12:40 PM
#10
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(08-19-2012, 10:18 AM)beartrap Wrote: That sucks for non US buyers, they would really be missing out on the great product.
Brian, is this an option to ship it to a wholesaler across the pond by ship or there are still restrictions?

Well, I don't know yet. Maybe it's feasable for large orders to ship through UPS, but they are VERY expensive internationally. Far too expensive IMO for just a few bottles. But I don't know for sure yet. I can discuss it with them on Tuesday.

Hans, what changed was my understanding. Yes, I remember what Krissie referred to. The jet went down in the Everglades, hundreds killed, because of something to do with spent O2 generators or some such. Brian wouldn't do well in the cellblock (worst case) since that could be a penalty.

I've thought of allowing the consumer to add the alcohol long ago when I was going through the BATFE considerations, but it's a non-starter since alcohol is there as a preservative; also to pull the natural scents out of the spices by cold steeping more efficiently. I might be able to use a hot steep for the scent, but that still leaves the preservative effect to tackle. I don't want most preservatives on my skin, and I won't do that to other folks. Alcohol is relatively safe, and besides, when I get one of my extremely close shaves I like the little sting that I get from it.

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 08-19-2012, 12:56 PM
#11
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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What I want to know is how can they serve cocktails on a passenger plane? If they are truly worried about the flashpoint, you would think they would start with the little bottles of alcohol that have a much higher proof than aftershave. Sheesh!

Oh yea...the little bottles of alcohol make a tidy profit for the airline. Hmm

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 08-19-2012, 01:13 PM
#12
  • beartrap
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  • Southern California
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(08-19-2012, 12:56 PM)bullgoose Wrote: What I want to know is how can they serve cocktails on a passenger plane? If they are truly worried about the flashpoint, you would think they would start with the little bottles of alcohol that have a much higher proof than aftershave. Sheesh!

Oh yea...the little bottles of alcohol make a tidy profit for the airline. Hmm

I am sure everyone knows it's always about the money, be that licensing fees or extra stickers/packaging. No way there will be an explosion from a bottle of aftershave.

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 08-19-2012, 01:27 PM
#13
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Yeah, Phil, It's a knee jerk reaction by bureaucrats IMO. Remember if they had anything on the ball they'd be doing for themselves and wouldn't be at Uncle Sams trough of swill. It all goes back to the post I did quite awhile ago about Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead. If they can't do it, well, neither can you unless you cut them in.

My product is 20% alcohol, about the same as champagne. It can ignite at 200°F. I did the testing today. Of course it needs to be brought up to that temperature first and there needs to be fire present. Seems to me that if fire is present the problem already exists since most baggage and packages are flammable. I don't see many concrete or steel suitcases at the airport, and suitcases contain after shaves, etc.

I'm going to make some calls when I can to look into this further. I did my testing deliberately to make sure if fire could occur it would. But it just doesn't seem right that 40 proof (20%) is a fire hazard.

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