05-03-2017, 07:59 AM
#1
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Gents, this is the 2nd brush I messed up in last 2 weeks.

I had purchased this few months back and was slowly becoming a favorite. Few days back, it just slipped out of my hand while lathering and the handle cracked.

Any inputs what to do with it? Should I send it to Simpsons? Is there a better option available in terms of repairing it?

Please chime in. Thanks in advance.[Image: 9670b6b10fa4b926b2eb2a018b01d545.jpg][Image: ddc20d02639421cb7549ac371f3803d7.jpg]


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 05-03-2017, 08:04 AM
#2
  • German
  • Simpson 2 Band Aficionado
  • USA
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You can ask Simpson to reset in a new handle or send it to a TSN artisan to fit in a new custom handle of your choice.

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 05-03-2017, 08:09 AM
#3
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I think some super glue/epoxy and bit of clamping force will close up that gap and you'll be back in business.

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 05-03-2017, 08:11 AM
#4
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(05-03-2017, 08:04 AM)German Wrote: You can ask Simpson to reset in a new handle or send it to a TSN artisan to fit in a new custom handle of your choice.

Signs011   Those are your choices.  It all depends on whether you want the Simpson D3 handle.  Sorry that you had this mishap.

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 05-03-2017, 08:12 AM
#5
  • ddk13
  • Senior Member
  • Nebraska
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I'd make lemonade and get a new brush.  I mean who doesn't love a new brush. Smile

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 05-03-2017, 08:33 AM
#6
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Sorry to see that Jagdeep.  If it were me, I'd purchase a new Duke 3 and salvage the knot for another brush -- either sending it to Simpson or having another artisan set it -- or get a handle from an artisan and set it yourself.  Best of luck.

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 05-03-2017, 09:20 AM
#7
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(05-03-2017, 08:12 AM)ddk13 Wrote: I'd make lemonade and get a new brush.  I mean who doesn't love a new brush. Smile


Brush deal in the works btw...


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 05-03-2017, 09:22 AM
#8
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(05-03-2017, 08:33 AM)wreck | fish Wrote: Sorry to see that Jagdeep.  If it were me, I'd purchase a new Duke 3 and salvage the knot for another brush -- either sending it to Simpson or having another artisan set it -- or get a handle from an artisan and set it yourself.  Best of luck.


Boss man, why don't I send it to you and get that ivory lining handle you posted on your project few days back...


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 05-03-2017, 09:25 AM
#9
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(05-03-2017, 08:09 AM)Blackland Razors Wrote: I think some super glue/epoxy and bit of clamping force will close up that gap and you'll be back in business.


I tried doing it initially Shane. Somehow, I get a feeling that if I try clamping hard to glue it, handle might crack up further. I have shot a mail to Simpsons but I am also keen in getting it fixed up by an artisan here on the nook.



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 05-03-2017, 09:47 AM
#10
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(05-03-2017, 09:22 AM)Jags009 Wrote:
(05-03-2017, 08:33 AM)wreck | fish Wrote: Sorry to see that Jagdeep.  If it were me, I'd purchase a new Duke 3 and salvage the knot for another brush -- either sending it to Simpson or having another artisan set it -- or get a handle from an artisan and set it yourself.  Best of luck.


Boss man, why don't I send it to you and get that ivory lining handle you posted on your project few days back...


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Smile ...

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 05-04-2017, 08:24 AM
#11
  • chamm
  • Expert on nothing
  • Central Ohio
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If this were my brush, (and I have similar mishaps in the past) I would run down to my local big-box hardware store and pick up a clear two-part epoxy. I have used Gorilla brand in the past with great success, but others have reported success with a wide variety of brands. Just make sure it's water proof, two-part epoxy, not polyurethane or cyanoacrylate. Those glues will wreck your handle.

Once you have the glue, pre-planning is crucial. Once the epoxy is activated, (mixed) you have a set amount of time to get things in place. You don't want to rush things and make mistakes. There are no mulligans or do-overs.

To plan: make sure the pieces fit together cleanly. Make sure you have a reliable way to hold them in place for whatever the set time is for your epoxy. If you are clamping, make sure you do a dry run with the clamp, and make sure you can easily set the pieces. Make sure they don't slide, and make sure that the pieces aren't going to pop out of place once you've applied the epoxy. Alternatively, you can hold it in place with tape, or a rubber band. Figure out which one works best, and put it in place a few times, to make sure you're confident that you won't mess it up.

If you get epoxy inside the knot, (except of course the base) it will be irreparably ruined. By design, the epoxy won't wash out, and there are no solvents that will remove it without ruining the badger hair. What I'm saying is that once the epoxy is mixed, be very, very careful. You may want to carefully wrap the knot in a piece of paper, then tightly wrap the paper in masking tape. The paper will block glue from getting in the knot, but be careful you don't get the sticky part of the tape in the hair. It might pull some of it out.

Clean both surfaces very, very thoroughly. Rubbing alcohol or denatured alcohols work well, but you want to ensure that there is no dirt, dust, or oil on the surfaces to be bonded. If the surface is very smooth, the epoxy might not grip it well. If that's the case, carefully and lightly sand or scratch the surfaces. Take care not to scuff up the parts of the brush that will be showing, only the part between the crack. Don't go overboard - you aren't trying to remove material, just give the epoxy some nooks and crannies to fill into. After you've done that, clean the surfaces thoroughly again, and make sure your pieces still fit together solidly, and you clamping solution will work.

Now for game time. Squirt an equal amount of each part of the epoxy onto something disposable, like a piece of cardboard or plastic. Paper towels don't work well because the epoxy can soak through, and then you'll have a piece of towel permanently affixed to your table. If the epoxy comes in a syringe, keep in mind that one component is usually much thicker than the other. If you aren't maying attention, this will cause them to squirt out very unevenly. The syringes work OK, but not great. Make sure the mix is equal parts, or the epoxy will weaken.

We've reached the point of no return. Take something disposable and mix the dickens out of the epoxy. I mean, mix it really, really well. I like to use popsicle sticks, because unlike toothpicks, they have a flat, spatula-like surface. Also, I get to eat a popsicle. ? Neither part of the epoxy is rigid by itself, so if you have un-mixed pockets of one or the other, you will have a weak spot in the final mix that will never harden. The epoxy I use has a 5-minute working time, and I mix for a full 60 seconds.

Once the mixture is an absolutely uniform 50/50 mix of the two parts, very carefully apply a small amount to the surface to be bonded. You want to make sure the surface is completely covered, but keep in mind that if the two parts fit together perfectly, there won't be much space for the epoxy. The last thing you want is for it all to come squirting out when you join the parts and into your knot. This is the biggest potential for damaging your knot.

If the epoxy squirts out onto the handle, don't try to wipe it off. Let it cure, and once it's hard, you can sand, file, or polish it completely smooth. The only thing you'll accomplish by wiping it is to spread the epoxy around, and probably mess up the joint.

Once you've joined the broken pieces and secured them in place, put the brush down and walk away. I've messed up more than one glue job because I'm impatient, and I want to see the work. Avoid that temptation. If the glue cures completely in 2 hours, give it 8. It's not going to hurt, and you can only weaken it by messing with it.

After the glue has had plenty of time to cure, you can carefully remove the clamp and test the joint. It's as hard now as it's ever going to be, so make sure the pieces are well and stuck together. If your join was clean, it should just look like a small crack. If some epoxy escaped, now is the time to file or sand it smooth. Depending on how much epoxy you need to remove, you may want to start with a slightly courser file, but take care to remove as little of the original handle material as possible. If your file or sandpaper is too coarse, the gouges in the handle may be too deep to polish out. I generally start with a very fine flat file, then gradually move to increasingly fine-grit sandpaper. I usually finish off with some fine polishing compound, like Mother's Plastic Polish, or my favorite, Simichrone.

Now, this post is a lot of words, and it sounds pretty complicated, but in reality, it's not. I think that anyone could read this, spend about $10 on materials, and do a really nice job repairing any crack or chip in a shaving brush. So long as you pay attention to details, I think you can do it. And if you've decided to move on to another brush, all the better. Now you can have one to practice on, so that the next time you need to do a repair, it won't be your first.

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 05-04-2017, 09:02 AM
#12
  • chamm
  • Expert on nothing
  • Central Ohio
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Because nobody asked, I thought I'd post before and after pictures of one of my successful repair jobs. Cool
Here is a picture before. It's difficult to see from the picture, but the chip was completely dislodged from the brush.
[Image: Uu4K7E.jpg]

And after 30 minutes and a lot of love:
[Image: pQQORN.jpg]

The hairline crack will always be visible, but I can absolutely not feel it at all when I run my finger over it. This is still one of my favorite brushes today, and I was extremely happy to have been able to fix it. It has been part of my main rotation for over 2 years since the repair, and it shows no signs whatsoever of degrading. As far as I'm concerned, I should be able to pass this down to my son and his son.  Biggrin

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 05-04-2017, 09:48 AM
#13
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Hey Craig, many thanks for taking out time to write detailed note. As far as I am concerned,this job is beyond my capacity...

I will either be sending it over to Simpsons or wait for an artisan to help me fix it up.

Thanks once again.I honestly enjoyed reading it.


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 05-05-2017, 07:19 AM
#14
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Bayside, NY
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Craig, that was a wonderfully informative post. Thank you Smile

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 05-05-2017, 07:22 AM
#15
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Same thing happened to me. I had Rudy Vey put it in this faux briar handle. Still one of my favorite brushes.

[Image: rr8Xx3i.jpg]

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 05-05-2017, 09:07 AM
#16
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(05-05-2017, 07:22 AM)Journeyman Wrote: Same thing happened to me. I had Rudy Vey put it in this faux briar handle. Still one of my favorite brushes.

[Image: rr8Xx3i.jpg]


Wow! This looks neat. I am gonna get in touch with Mr. Rudy soon.


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 05-05-2017, 10:19 AM
#17
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(05-05-2017, 09:07 AM)Jags009 Wrote:
(05-05-2017, 07:22 AM)Journeyman Wrote: Same thing happened to me. I had Rudy Vey put it in this faux briar handle. Still one of my favorite brushes.

[Image: rr8Xx3i.jpg]


Wow! This looks neat. I am gonna get in touch with Mr. Rudy soon.


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Happy to help out. Look forward to seeing the new brush.  Wink

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 05-05-2017, 11:40 AM
#18
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Bayside, NY
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Rudy's great to do business with. He replaced the knot in my Duke 3 with a nice Shavemac 2 band. The job was beautifully done with super speedy turn around time.

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 05-06-2017, 08:12 AM
#19
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Wow!  I'm very sorry to see what happened to your Duke 3.  That's a real downer for sure.

Having seen--and attempted repairs--on a few broken brushes, and with due respect to those who've given serious thought to this matter, I'd like to offer a few thoughts.  First the "easy" part:  the chip out of the handle is easily repaired with either medium CA glue or a very thin layer of 2-part epoxy.  (For the strongest bond, my adhesive manufacturer tells me is that you want to use as little adhesive as possible--just enough for an even coating--when working with impermeable materials like cast polyester.)

The cracks in the ferrule need to be repaired very carefully because the hair will want to "wick" up the adhesive, ruining the knot.  If this were a cheap brush, you might risk it; but with a nice brush like this, I'd strongly recommend sending it back to Mark for a new handle.  If you don't want to go to that expense, I'm sure Rudy, Bob Quinn, Peter Wolf (and I'm sure others) have the experience/skill to successfully cut away the ferrule and make an appropriate replacement handle for you.  Removing a knot is a bit touchy but not terribly difficult for someone who knows what he's doing.

I hope this works out for you.

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