05-04-2017, 12:58 PM
#1
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What is everyone's thought on Stirling's mutton tallow shave soaps? Is the performance top tier?

Cheers

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 05-04-2017, 12:59 PM
#2
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(05-04-2017, 12:58 PM)SweetReason Wrote: What is everyone's thought on Stirling's mutton tallow shave soaps? Is the performance top tier?

Cheers


I have Scottish pine, if it was lavender scented it would possibly be my favorite soap. Performance is top notch all around

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 05-04-2017, 02:28 PM
#3
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Mutton tallow????

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 05-04-2017, 02:30 PM
#4
  • Agravic
  • Super Moderator
  • Pennsylvania, USA
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(05-04-2017, 02:28 PM)nervosa1901 Wrote: Mutton tallow????

Seems gamey to me..

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 05-04-2017, 02:32 PM
#5
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I believe its the same form of tallow used in MWF, but I would have to research this again to be certain

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 05-04-2017, 02:42 PM
#6
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(05-04-2017, 02:32 PM)Safelysimpson Wrote: I believe its the same form of tallow used in MWF, but I would have to research this again to be certain

Please do.

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 05-04-2017, 02:55 PM
#7
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Scots Pine Sheep is probably the best soap that I have ever used. There is a night and day difference between that soap, and the rest of the Stirling line. So what's the catch? It stinks! It may be a top notch performer, but it smells like a barnyard.

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 05-04-2017, 03:08 PM
#8
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Mutton sure does taste good, I bet it shaves good too.

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 05-04-2017, 03:11 PM
#9
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I haven't tried this soap.  However, I wonder whether the  source of the tallow has any relation to the performance of the soap.  So far I'm aware of soap makers identifying mutton tallow and bison tallow, and there may be others.  Does the animal the tallow originates from really matter, or could this be a marketing gimmick?

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 05-04-2017, 03:18 PM
#10
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(05-04-2017, 03:11 PM)TheLegalRazor Wrote: I haven't tried this soap.  However, I wonder whether the  source of the tallow has any relation to the performance of the soap.  So far I'm aware of soap makers identifying mutton tallow and bison tallow, and there may be others.  Does the animal the tallow originates from really matter, or could this be a marketing gimmick?

Try some of Stirling's mutton tallow, and beef tallow soaps, and do a comparison. There is a substantial difference, which leads me to believe that it is not a marketing gimmick at all. 

I believe that mutton tallow would be quite popular, if not for its bad smell. I have yet to try bison tallow, however, so I cannot speak for it.

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 05-04-2017, 03:26 PM
#11
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(05-04-2017, 02:42 PM)nervosa1901 Wrote:
(05-04-2017, 02:32 PM)Safelysimpson Wrote: I believe its the same form of tallow used in MWF, but I would have to research this again to be certain

Please do.

So after some research there seems to be primarily 2 kinds of tallow, sheep /lamb and beef/byson. Sheep/lamb tallow is referred to as mutton tallow.

MWF is made with mutton tallow, hence the name Mitchell's wool fat.

Electric sheep and Scots pine from Stirling both utilize this mutton tallow. I personally dont find the scent terrible, to me it seems like one of their more natural scents, but its not really a scent profile I'm searching for in a shave soap. I would describe it as a piney/earthy type scent.

I personally noticed a difference with the mutton tallow Stirling vs their normal line, seems to be a bit creamier and more protective. It also makes a very stable lather that holds plenty of water and doesn't dry out. Post-shave feel is also top notch, leaving your skin feeling very soft and supple. This could also be the lanolin nourishing the skin as well , which from my quick reading is derived from sheep, right above the fat layer

I haven't tried MWF so I can't compare the 2, someday though.

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 05-04-2017, 03:31 PM
#12
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(05-04-2017, 03:18 PM)TropicalHotDog Wrote:
(05-04-2017, 03:11 PM)TheLegalRazor Wrote: I haven't tried this soap.  However, I wonder whether the  source of the tallow has any relation to the performance of the soap.  So far I'm aware of soap makers identifying mutton tallow and bison tallow, and there may be others.  Does the animal the tallow originates from really matter, or could this be a marketing gimmick?

Try some of Stirling's mutton tallow, and beef tallow soaps, and do a comparison. There is a substantial difference, which leads me to believe that it is not a marketing gimmick at all. 

I believe that mutton tallow would be quite popular, if not for its bad smell. I have yet to try bison tallow, however, so I cannot speak for it.

Ricardo, I've noticed a difference as well better post shave with more cushion and creamier lather

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 05-04-2017, 03:46 PM
#13
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(05-04-2017, 12:58 PM)SweetReason Wrote: What is everyone's thought on Stirling's mutton tallow shave soaps? Is the performance top tier?

Cheers

(nobody reads)

http://shavenook.com/showthread.php?tid=48338&pid=797308#pid797308

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 05-04-2017, 03:53 PM
#14
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(05-04-2017, 03:26 PM)Safelysimpson Wrote:
(05-04-2017, 02:42 PM)nervosa1901 Wrote:
(05-04-2017, 02:32 PM)Safelysimpson Wrote: I believe its the same form of tallow used in MWF, but I would have to research this again to be certain

Please do.

MWF is made with mutton tallow, hence the name Mitchell's wool fat.

It is fairly well established that the “wool fat” reference in the Mitchell’s Wool Fat designation refers to lanolin, which is not tallow, and is not saponifiable.

(05-04-2017, 03:26 PM)Safelysimpson Wrote: Electric sheep and Scots pine from Stirling both utilize this mutton tallow.

As do some other Stirling varieties, including Port-au-Prince.

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 05-04-2017, 06:37 PM
#15
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(05-04-2017, 03:11 PM)TheLegalRazor Wrote: I haven't tried this soap.  However, I wonder whether the  source of the tallow has any relation to the performance of the soap.  So far I'm aware of soap makers identifying mutton tallow and bison tallow, and there may be others.  Does the animal the tallow originates from really matter, or could this be a marketing gimmick?

Forget not duck fat.  
Bufflehead.  Fabulous, they say — if you can procure it.

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 05-04-2017, 08:53 PM
#16
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Looks like mutton is sheep, mature sheep (to be specific) fat from the suet. I remember reading that the Bufflehead soaps do feel different during post shave feel and part of it is the duck fat is composed of different fatty acids compared to beef fat. So the fat can make a difference in different parts of the soaps properties.

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 05-05-2017, 02:23 AM
#17
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(05-04-2017, 08:53 PM)zaclikestoshave Wrote: Looks like mutton is sheep, mature sheep (to be specific) fat from the suet.

According to Stirling, it is a very specialized selection of sheep fat.  Again, I refer you to this post:  


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 05-05-2017, 04:40 AM
#18
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(05-04-2017, 03:53 PM)Mel S Meles Wrote:
(05-04-2017, 03:26 PM)Safelysimpson Wrote:
(05-04-2017, 02:42 PM)nervosa1901 Wrote: Please do.

MWF is made with mutton tallow, hence the name Mitchell's wool fat.

It is fairly well established that the “wool fat” reference in the Mitchell’s Wool Fat designation refers to lanolin, which is not tallow, and is not saponifiable

Well how about we look at it this way, wool fat is what? Wool fat is a reference to a sheep and the fat of a sheep is called mutton tallow. Lanolin is not a fat, it is a layer in between the skin of the sheep and the fat, and it also resides in the wool giving it a yellowish color instead of a snow white appearance.

Lanolin is well known as one of the main ingredients however it is also, what, 14th on the list of ingredients? Do you think they would call their products Mitchell's wool fat without using the actual fat of the sheep?

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 05-05-2017, 05:49 AM
#19
  • Coyote
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  • Hondo, TX USA
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I have used Stirling Scots Pine Sheep bath soap almost exclusively for 3+ years now. I just got some of the mutton tallow shave soap in Port-au-Prince. To me, it is a notch above the beef tallow soaps they make. I think Rod has three mutton tallow shave soaps now?

[Image: SOTD%204-10-17_zpsg3dwfcmx.jpg]

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 05-05-2017, 06:06 AM
#20
  • Beau
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  • Westchester, NY
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From their description at the Mitchell's Wool Fat website, it seems pretty clear that "wool fat" in the name refers to lanolin, not mutton tallow:

"MITCHELL’S WOOL FAT SOAP was first produced in the early 1930’s by Bradford chemist Fred Mitchell who realised that the natural lanolin content of wool fat, which kept the hands of local sheep shearers and wool sorters so exceptionally soft, could also be beneficial to delicate complexions and sensitive skins. A simple and natural product, this soap is still made to Mr Mitchell’s original formula, based on a recipe from the turn of the century and incorporating lanolin from the wool fat as the key ingredient."

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