05-07-2017, 02:21 PM
#1
User Info
As the thread title says I'm thinking of trying a straight razor . What would be some good first straight razor advice and also what would be a good starter razor ? Any and all input is welcome . Thank you in advance .

5 170
Reply
 05-07-2017, 02:35 PM
#2
User Info
Dan aka Doc47 is kind enough to help those of us who "want to go straight". He's sent me a list of do's and don'ts; also I'm getting a care package to get me going in the right direction. Take a look at the end of thread "Why are you giving up on straights?" for his very generous offer.

RON

0 88
Reply
 05-08-2017, 07:28 AM
#3
  • Steve56
  • Active Member
  • Knoxville, TN
User Info
Just about any straight in good condition and properly honed will be fine. Pick one you like and go for it! Personally I like razors from 11/16 to 13/16 wide and favor Japanese brands, though many American brands were also great, like Torrey amd Geneva, and the usually Solingen sourced hardware store razors were also good, Schumate, Simmons, Hibbard, Spencer, and Bartlett (now True Value Hardware).

Don't worry about nose shapes (round, square, French) or grinds at this point.

I hone razors and would be glad to send you one to try out if you PM me a mailing address.

Cheers, Steve

7 446
Reply
 05-08-2017, 11:18 AM
#4
  • doc47
  • Active Member
  • Northern Arizona
User Info
PM me your address and I'll send you a couple of starter razors to get you on your way.

4 385
Reply
 05-08-2017, 02:56 PM
#5
User Info
start by watching videos in youtube.

learn to walk.  then to run.  let your first time be small... from one sideburn to the jawline. with the grain.  

do a full pre shave routine.  i used to disbelieve it, but when i began using pre shave oil, i stopped seeing little red dots in the lather!

stretch your skin.  pay attention to your grip.  feel comfortable.  if your are not, stop.  don't be in a rush! ever!

finally, wear something.  shorts, underwear, even a towel.  never ever shave naked.  the stakes are too high.

and one more thing:  turn the water off.  it is important to listen to your blade.  audio feedback is seldom mentioned, but its the best way to construct a map of your face, grain wise. 

as a starter, get an entry level dovo from straightrazordesign.com or some other reputable vendor.  the shop you buy it from is important.  any blade sold there is honed by lynn abraham himself.  the blades do not come shave ready from factory.  well, custom razor makers do, but that is another subject.  you don't want to get there just yet.  lynn sells a video in his web site.  buy that.  a b c´s are spelled in order there.  if you don't, you will be running in circles for some time. you will also need a strop.  paddle strops makes the learning curve so much easier.  

get going.  the satisfaction, the accomplishment has no price!

0 412
Reply
 05-08-2017, 04:44 PM
#6
User Info
(05-08-2017, 11:18 AM)doc47 Wrote: PM me your address and I'll send you a couple of starter razors to get you on your way.

Very generous Doc. You are a true gentleman.

11 819
Reply
 05-08-2017, 04:45 PM
#7
User Info
(05-08-2017, 07:28 AM)Steve56 Wrote: Just about any straight in good condition and properly honed will be fine. Pick one you like and go for it! Personally I like razors from 11/16 to 13/16 wide and favor Japanese brands, though many American brands were also great, like Torrey amd Geneva, and the usually Solingen sourced hardware store razors were also good, Schumate, Simmons, Hibbard, Spencer, and Bartlett (now True Value Hardware).

Don't worry about nose shapes (round, square, French) or grinds at this point.

I hone razors and would be glad to send you one to try out if you PM me a mailing address.

Cheers, Steve

Very nice offer Steve!

11 819
Reply
 05-08-2017, 05:04 PM
#8
User Info
I am blown away by the generosity from everyone . I really truly do appreciate all the offers and advice from everyone . I want to thank Doc and Steve for offering to send me some starter razors as well . They are truly stand up guys and a outstanding representation of this community .

5 170
Reply
 05-09-2017, 01:24 PM
#9
  • matloffm
  • Senior Member
  • Culver City, CA
User Info
If you have smooth skin and a beard that's not hard to cut, straights are a fine way to shave.  If you have neither, I would go with a Feather AC razor.  The technique is the same but the Feather AC blade will handle coarse beards far better than a regular straight.  There are straight razor forums that have a great deal of useful information about honing, stropping, what razors to avoid, etc.

Good luck.

19 564
Reply
 05-10-2017, 03:03 PM
#10
  • Steve56
  • Active Member
  • Knoxville, TN
User Info
A properly honed straight razor will make short work of the toughest beard.

Cheers, Steve

7 446
Reply
 05-11-2017, 05:43 PM
#11
  • matloffm
  • Senior Member
  • Culver City, CA
User Info
(05-10-2017, 03:03 PM)Steve56 Wrote: A properly honed straight razor will make short work of the toughest beard.

Cheers, Steve

I guess mine is tougher than the toughest.  Wink

19 564
Reply
 05-11-2017, 06:24 PM
#12
User Info
(05-10-2017, 03:03 PM)Steve56 Wrote: A properly honed straight razor will make short work of the toughest beard.

Cheers, Steve

yes.  thats right!  check out sharpologist.com.  you will see irrefutable evidence that a straight can be as sharp or sharper than a feather super pro (considered the sharpest object made by men).  

i have barbed wire for whiskers and any of my straights go through it like a red hot knife on butter, no problem at all.

nevertheless, the advice that you probably should start with a shavette has its merits.  it takes all the sharpening and stropping out of the way.  but, hey!  thats part of the fun, isn't it?

0 412
Reply
 05-12-2017, 03:39 AM
#13
User Info
My journey into straight razors began with the Feather AC (both folding and non folding) using the logic that it would be an easy way to explore without having to deal with stropping and sharpening.  The downside is the Feather blades are wicked sharp and unforgiving.  Even the Pro Guard blades have the capacity to cut with no warning or feedback.  

I made the move to straights about a year ago and all that comes with it (stropping/honing) and in retrospect I wish I would have started with straights rather than the AC.  There is more to learn but if the goal is to end up in the world of straight razor shaving you are going to have to learn it all sooner or later anyway.

Now that I have a year of straight razor experience I would like to pick up another Feather AC and see if I get better results now that I have some straight razor skills.  At the end of the day the AC provides an incredibly close shave.

6 216
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)