08-20-2012, 06:31 AM
#1
  • Striky
  • Senior Member
  • Reipå, Norway
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I want to get me a nice and good pen to write with. Im left handed, so what pen is the best choice?

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 08-20-2012, 07:24 AM
#2
  • Dave
  • Moderator Emeritus
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Count me in on this as well. I need a good beginner fountain pen as I'd like to give this a shot too

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 08-20-2012, 07:31 AM
#3
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To the OP, I assume you are looking for a fountain pen?

A good fountain pen I'd recommend to start with is the LAMY Al-Star or Safari (same pen, Al-Star is made of aluminum, Safari out of plastic). I bought one as my first fountain pen and still use it most of the time in my office. It's easy to use, nibs are easily interchangeable if you want to mix things up, and are pretty bulletproof at not leaking and being clean to work with. You can either start with the cartridge that they provide, or you can purchase a converter to use any color of ink you want. I'd also recommend getting a 1.1mm italic nib as its easily my favorite nib and really falls in the sweet spot for everyday writing. The pen is about $40 or so, kitted with converter and italic nib you'd be out about $50 plus a bottle or sample of ink.

On the more budgeted side are Platinum Preppy's. They are dirt cheap, about $4, and can be made an eyedropper pen easily. I don't really care for them, as I'm not impressed with the performance, and of the 2 I own, one decided to bleed ink out of the feed uncontrollably.

Another tempting budget-friendly item are the Nooder's flex pens (Ahab and Konrad). They are fun pens, but require a willingness to tweak them to get them to really perform, and the way the feed is exposed leaves it easy to touch and get ink on your hands (at least the way I hold a pen). As such, I wouldn't recommend it as a first fountain pen. My LAMY will only get ink on you if you write on yourself.

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 08-20-2012, 12:42 PM
#4
  • njpaddy
  • Member
  • Central New Jersey
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For a beginner fountain pen, I recommend a Pilot 78(M) from ebay for about $10. I'm no expert, but I think my 78G writes as nice as my Aurora which cost 5x as much.

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 08-20-2012, 01:41 PM
#5
  • Striky
  • Senior Member
  • Reipå, Norway
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I'm not in the marked for a fountain pen, as I have no good experiemce with it as a left hand person. But I'm in the marked for a good pen. Maby a ballpoint or a rollerball, as it's less messy for a left hand person?

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 08-20-2012, 02:00 PM
#6
  • krissy
  • Active Member
  • Cando, North Dakota
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HEY I'M A LEFTIE AS WELL!!!! And new to fountain pens!!!!!
But I don't write with a hook to my hand, as I write with my wrist straight. When I was in lower grade school the headmaster of my school who was also a leftie took all us lefties to give us personal penmanship classes as a group. I think that really made a difference for me. So I turn the paper if needed rather than my wrist.

But anywho back to the point.....

Freddy sent me a Platinum Preppy pen to give me a taste of fountain pens. I really do like that pen a lot! I have found that I like the medium nib but they are cheap enough that you can order both fine and medium to see which you like the best. But it's a good starter pen.....
http://www.gouletpens.com/Platinum_Prepp..._s/879.htm


Then I ordered the Platinum Plaisir pen and while it's a little more it doesn't break the bank. I also think this pen looks really super classy! I'm sure I'll get another one of these pens in another color just to have a different color ink in it.
http://www.gouletpens.com/Platinum_Plaisir_s/880.htm
I also got the converter for it and ordered a couple of different color ink samples to start with. I absolutely love this pen!!!! I also got the medium nib for it as well. Right now I have the red dragon ink in it and i love it!

I also bought a notebook at walmart, it's spiral bound at the top and it's not with the regular notebooks but more by the office supply stuff. It's Ampad brand the project planner. It was $3 and change so cheap, but it has heavier weight paper than most notebooks. So that's why I like it. I've been using these for years. This would be a great notebook for you since it's spiral bound and being a leftie the spiral on the left side of the page can be a pain to write with.

excuse the cord my cell phone needs charging so I had it plugged in when I took the picture.
[Image: notebook-400.jpg]

I use one of these for my business notes that I jot down. But I picked up another to have to practice my penmanship with using my new fountain pens.
Granted you can write anything and sometimes I do. But I also found this link that has these great funny sentences that you can copy and write over and over down the sheet.
http://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/...ful-sites/

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 08-20-2012, 03:16 PM
#7
  • freddy
  • Senior Member
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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Striky, I know you're not looking for a fountain pen but to me, all ballpoints write pretty much the same so it would be whatever you want.

An interesting choice might be a Kaweco Classic Sport cartridge roller ball. I have one of these (along with the matching fountain pen) and love it. It uses fountain pen ink cartridges but has a classic roller ball tip. this gives you the advantage of changing ink colors, after flushing out the tip of the old color. It is a pocket/purse pen so it must be posted to write with but because of its closed diminutive size, it is very easy to carry in a pocket (or for the ladies, a handbag).

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 08-20-2012, 03:57 PM
#8
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My recommendation is a fountain pen. The notion persists that lefties cannot use a fountain pen. It is not universally true, especially if fast drying ink is used. Some of the Noodler's inks dry rather quickly and should work well for a left-handed person.

I am left handed, and use a Hero 100 all day every day at work. The pen has not given me a bit of trouble in six years. A great deal for US $27. The Hero 1000 looks to be much like the Hero 100, and so might also be a good choice. The Pelikan M200 and M215 are good pens, as is the Pilot Knight.

If you want to avoid fountain pens, gel pens are a good, smooth-writing alternative. The Parker Urban or Pilot G2 Limited are nice if you want a fancy pen. At a much lower price point, the Pilot G2 Pro works well.

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 08-20-2012, 04:37 PM
#9
  • krissy
  • Active Member
  • Cando, North Dakota
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T-Bone do you write with a hook to your wrist or do you write with a straight wrist. I'm not sure if that makes a difference, but when you write with the hook as it's often called the flat part of your hand goes over the ink. Wouldn't that smear the ink? Or does a fast drying ink dry fast enough so you don't end up with your hand covered in ink?

Another thought is to practice writing on a notebook without the left hand spiral (top spiral is good) and work at trying to turn the paper and keep your hand/wrist straight. A bit of retraining, but it can be done. It just needs some practice to get use to writing in a new position.

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 08-20-2012, 05:07 PM
#10
  • syngent
  • Senior Member
  • Oshawa, Canada
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Lamy safaris are a great choice too not to expensive has great nib options comfortable and durable not much more you could ask for out of a pen

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 08-20-2012, 08:43 PM
#11
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* Pilot 78 (broad)
* Lamy Safari (fine, medium)
* Kaweco Classic Sport

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 08-21-2012, 02:36 AM
#12
  • Striky
  • Senior Member
  • Reipå, Norway
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I'm not a good writer, and I don't want to change the way I'm writing (will take time to get a nice hand write). My flat part of the hand will go over the ink when writing (which I believe is what Krissy is calling writing with a hook?). I am open to try a fountain, but have it in mind that I'm a lefty and my hand will touch the ink while writing. The fountain pen I have used before, along with the ink, did result in a mess, as my hand went over the ink (probably not fast drying ink). My hand covered in ink, and ink smeared over the paper. Thats why I was looking for a ball point pen. But if there is a way for me to write with a fountain pen (a good pen with ink that wont smear) without having to change the way I'm writing, then I'm interested.

Tbone: Does you're hand goes over the ink while writing? If so, what ink do you use?

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 08-21-2012, 03:04 AM
#13
  • etoyoc
  • Active Member
  • NW Indiana
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I see that there are a few Lamy Al-Star, Safari, Vista suggestions. These are great starter and beat around pens. However, with that being said - there are two things to consider. 1) the cap snaps on and sometimes not very tightly. It you are sticking the pen in a pocket to carry, be aware that the pen could come unattached. 2) Those Lamy models have a non-round grip section that has been shaped to make the pen more comfortable to hold if you use the Lamy approved pen position. Many fountain pen users hate that grip. Many love the grip. If you don't write with the normal or Lamy accepted techniques, then the grip will probably be uncomfortable.

Smearing will be an issue with almost any fountain pen unless you take into account the nib size, the ink, and the paper. Some paper absorbs ink very quickly - but that also leads to feathering and your letters not looking very crisp. The better writing paper (rhodia, clairfontaine, etc...) often smears worse because the ink takes longer to dry. Some paper brands are very inconsistent in fiber and one journal will write great and another will feather. If you want to go with a top bound pad of paper like Krissy suggested try the sustainable cane fiber paper from Staples. For inks, you would want something that is a fast drying ink. For a nib, you would want to go as fine as you can handle. The finer the nib, the less ink is on the paper and the quicker it will dry. However, a finer nib will not feel as smooth and your writing may look more spidery.

The same things can probably be said for a ball point. You won't have as many choices for ink unless you get a nice pen body than can accept refills from many companies. But paper and point size will still mater as much as they do with a fountain pen.

Another option is to get a refillable rollerball. For example, you can get a Kaweco sport or a noodler's pen with a roller ball nib and still have all the options open for what ink you use.

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 08-21-2012, 05:41 AM
#14
  • syngent
  • Senior Member
  • Oshawa, Canada
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My parker quink ink is my fastest drier... but anything markers ledger should Be fast drying... no bottle ink is instant as far as anything I have tried if you have that bad habit of resting you palm and dragging it as you write (as I do) may be worth practicing floating your hand above paper and trailing a pinky to guide you but it is very awkward to do and takes quite a bit of time to get good with it

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 08-21-2012, 05:41 AM
#15
  • Howler
  • A calamophile and vintage razor lover
  • Fort Smith AR
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I'm left handed, I use only a fountain pen to write with. I do not though write like a typical left-handed writer with the hook, I write underhanded.

When I first started looking for a fountain pen I want into pen retail store. I picked-up a fountain pen to try, the clerk quickly informed me "that fountain pens are not really suited for left-handed writers, that I would be much better off with a roller ball.
Needless to say I did not follow the advice.

Left-handed people can use fountain pens successfully. I have found that choosing a faster drying inks are as important as the pen you choose. Personally for myself a fine point works the best for my writing. A fine point lays done a drier line, the ink drys faster. I have never had a problems of ink smearing when I write.

There has been great recommendations Lamy, Pilot, fountain pens all great choices. Sheaffer is introducing a line fountain pens called the Ferrari. The reviews have been very positive. Goulet pens has a great selection of pens and inks to choose from. Jet Pens has a great selection of Pilots and other makes.

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 08-21-2012, 11:49 AM
#16
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(08-20-2012, 04:37 PM)krissy Wrote: T-Bone do you write with a hook to your wrist or do you write with a straight wrist. I'm not sure if that makes a difference, but when you write with the hook as it's often called the flat part of your hand goes over the ink. Wouldn't that smear the ink? Or does a fast drying ink dry fast enough so you don't end up with your hand covered in ink?

I write with a left hand hook, but write just underneath where my hand is positioned. If the ink is slow drying, or if there are ink blotches, then I might get a little ink on my hand when I write the next line. That happened only very, very occasionally with Private Reserve American Blue ink. It never happens with Noodler's Legal Lapis, Black or Eternal Luxury Blue. The Hero 100 pen writes with a fine line, and so the ink dries faster than if a medium point pen is used. Writing on copier or inkjet printer paper also makes the ink dry lightning fast.

I started using Noodler's ink because it is waterproof, not because of a particular need for a fast drying ink. Noodler's inks also got good marks in Greg Clark's Fountain Pen Ink Sampler book.

Quote:Another thought is to practice writing on a notebook without the left hand spiral (top spiral is good) and work at trying to turn the paper and keep your hand/wrist straight. A bit of retraining, but it can be done. It just needs some practice to get use to writing in a new position.

In my opinion, wire spiral binding is annoying. Some of the Japanese notebooks, such as Apica and Tsubame, do not have spiral binding. They are a little pricey, although their stellar paper quality makes them worth it.

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 08-21-2012, 12:34 PM
#17
  • Howler
  • A calamophile and vintage razor lover
  • Fort Smith AR
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When looking for notebooks for myself I avoid spirals all together.
I looking for notebooks/journals that lay open flat.
Moleskine, PencilCity.com has a great selection of notebooks/journals at reasonable prices.

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 08-21-2012, 12:40 PM
#18
  • krissy
  • Active Member
  • Cando, North Dakota
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I created this short video on how I hold my pen and write as a leftie.

This is what I wrote on the paper.

I thought I would post a sample of how I write. It's interesting holding your cell phone and recording video and writing at the same time.
Krissy




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 08-21-2012, 01:25 PM
#19
  • freddy
  • Senior Member
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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Krissy, what a great short video. Even though I am right-handed, I have known quite a few lefties and most seem to use the hook you were describing. If the hand and arm can be trained as yours was it seems a much better option to prevent smearing. Even ballpoints can smear from time to time. I was really curious to see how you wrote script (your signature in this case) as opposed to printing. You have great penmanship, by the way. Thanks for sharing this.

P.S. That pen really looks snazzy in your hand. Wink

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 08-21-2012, 02:25 PM
#20
  • Howler
  • A calamophile and vintage razor lover
  • Fort Smith AR
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Krissy, great video. You have great penmanship.

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