05-26-2017, 07:11 PM
#1
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So what knives do you own ?

Do you plan on adding further knives to your collection?

I'm looking to get 3-4 knivs from a brand that sells SG2 high quality knives, but don't like wooden handles in my kitchen knives and don't like most of the Mikata handles I've seen.

Looking into getting some Kai, Misono or Mac knives.

I came close to buying 3 Miyabi 5000MCD 67 knives, but the wooden handle made me unsure.
My GF often places my expensive knives in the kitchen sink, even though I tell her NOT TO.

Let me hear what your favourite knives are !?

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 05-26-2017, 07:24 PM
#2
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Looking forward to hearing comments on this. I've been really getting into cooking lately and just recently purchased some nice cookware - All-Clad, and have begun to upgrade our cooking utensils. Our knives are currently serviceable but are probably the next item to upgrade.

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 05-26-2017, 09:40 PM
#3
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I find the grind to be of more worth than the knife itself assuming good steel and a usable handle. I've converted all of my knives over to the shallower Japanese angle.

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 05-27-2017, 03:21 AM
#4
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My wife and love our  Wusthof Culinar 10" Cooks knife.  Purchased it about 15 years ago, and expect it will go to my daughter sometime.  Great balance, heft, and holds an edge really well.

Best feature is that the blade is "taller", giving me more clearance between the handle and the cutting board, something that all other knives I have tried don't give me enough of.

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 05-27-2017, 03:51 AM
#5
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25 ish years ago my parents gave me a set of three Henckel's Twin Select knives. These have been my mainstay for most of my adult life. To this day, I keep them honed at 25 (for the big guy) and 20 degree angles. I am a pretty avid home cook, butcher a lot of my own meat, have canned like a prairie gramma, I am not sure what else you could need. I am pretty sure there are better out there, but not sure a guy needs to spend more.

[Image: aeb0d50dba1642c5ed21ea128f741689.jpg]

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 05-27-2017, 04:00 AM
#6
  • TheMonk
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  • Porto, Portugal
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I currently have regular cheap knives for everyday use, but have a black ceramic knife for delicate vegetables and some special knives I brought from Japan, a Aogami Super Santoku, a Shirogami 1 and a Yanagiba Aogami 1. I use these mostly for fish and meat.
I've been thinking of getting a proper everyday knife set, I'm undecided between Zwilling and Wusthof, and more inclined to Wusthof, even though they're more expensive. Would love to get some feedback and advice from more knowledgeable folks, though.

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 05-27-2017, 04:38 AM
#7
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Having worked in many kitchens during my youth I learned 1 thing. Handmade and Japenese are always some of the best. May I recommend the handmade offerings of Murray Carter a japenese taught bladesmith.  I have a few of these and they will redefine what a sharp kitchen knife is for most people. The "Carter knives are completely hand forged shaped and hand sharpened by Murray himself, the Mutaki are still really good by are made by the apprentices and only honed by Murray.  These knives I have found are also being used by Alton Brown and many other famous chefs, so that should say something about the edge and quality.

I must add however, your cutting surface is equally important. I prefer maple cutting boards personally, just make sure you are using something suitable.

Moderator Note: Link to website not affiliated with TSN deleted. 

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 05-27-2017, 06:24 AM
#8
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(05-26-2017, 07:11 PM)CHSeifert Wrote: So what knives do you own ?

Do you plan on adding further knives to your collection?

Well, now.  That is akin to asking what wheeled vehicles do you own, and do you plan on adding further wheeled vehicles to your collection?   Tongue   My answer could be a gardening cart or a Freightliner long-haul 18-wheeler.  

Apart from obvious differences in function (you would not use a paring knife as a meat cleaver, or vice versa), there are vast differences in style.  Among European style knives, there is a historic gulf between French knives from Thiers and German knives from Solingen.  The Solingen knives are made from hard — sometimes very hard — stainless steel, and generally have curved edges, so that dicing vegetables, for instance, can be done with a rocking motion from tip to handle.  The French knives are made from softer steel (no chromium in the alloy), and generally have straight edges, so that dicing vegetables, for instance, can be done with a slicing motion, the entire knife moved back and forth relative to the cook’s body.  The differences in hardness (and brittleness) are important:  French knives generally can be honed to a finer edge than German knives, and are sharper when freshly honed, but the edge dulls more quickly, so the French knives need to be sharpened and steeled (ripples along the edge straightened) more frequently than German knives, which hold their edge longer between sharpening operations.   And, of course, French knives must be maintained against rust more so than German knives do.  Those national style differences completely overwhelm the more subtle differences between brands within a national group.  

Japanese knives are a whole different story.  Historically, Japanese knives have been ground to a much shallower angle than either French or German knives, and that shallow angle affects maintenance issues (chipping and distortion along the edge requiring steeling); and some Japanese knives are ground on one side only, meaning that each knife is peculiarly suited to left-handed use or right-handed use only.  In America, Japanese knives currently are very trendy and chic, but when I (who lived some years in Japan half a century ago, and now am related by marriage to several skilled native Japanese cooks) watch our son’s millennial friends in the San Francisco Bay Area using their oh-so-trendy and insanely expensive Japanese knives in their own kitchens, it is clear that the technique must match the tool, and their tools are a mismatch for the technique that they learned from watching their mid-20th century parents.  Our son’s friends would be much better served, given their technique, with knives from Thiers or Solingen — but, of course, I cannot breathe a word of that observation out loud, because of their investment — monetary and ego — in their gorgeous Japanese knives.

In our kitchen, my bride of 45 years and I share cooking duties, and we use perhaps a dozen different knives regularly, but not equally.  My wife, born and raised in Japan, uses one knife, a Brazilian 6-inch-plus utility knife, forged from relatively soft steel, but with a gently curved edge, so it is neither German style nor French style, for at least 90 percent, probably closer to 95 percent, of her knifework, from boning to slicing to dicing, whatever.  I use a different size and style of knife according to task.  We are both happy with our respective choices, but as to results, I cannot deny that she is a better cook than I am.   Bow  

German, French, Japanese, Brazilian do not exhaust the spectrum, of course, so I will mention here two of the knives that I use a lot:  

The Eberhard Schaaf Goldhamster First Class “ham and cheese” knife with a kullenschliff edge.  (NB:  in some markets, instead of Eberhard Schaaf, it is sold as “Solicut,” a trademark seemingly derived from Solingen and cutting.)  This knife is so useful, I have actually observed my wife using it more and more (stealing some quality time from her Brazilian utiliity knife).  

 Edgecraft, a.k.a. ChefsChoice, is an under-the-radar American knife maker that quietly makes some of the best German-style knives made anywhere in the world, not excluding Solingen.  The company’s 8" chef’s knife handles better, feels right in the hand, and balances perfectly, than any other similarly sized chef’s knife I ever have held in my hand.  It features a “Trizor” (double angle bevel) edge, an Edgecraft innovation that happens to be the kind of edge that the best electric knife sharpeners in the world, the ChefsChoice brand knife sharpeners, also can impart to any other knife (but you probably do not want to put a Trizor edge on a Japanese knife).  

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 05-27-2017, 11:23 AM
#9
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I own a Wusthof 6" chef knife and a Wusthof paring knife.  I use them all the time.

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 05-27-2017, 01:15 PM
#10
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Well, I currently own 4 of the smaller (3" - 5") vegetables knives from Global Classic, 4 of the larger type (6"-8") Global SAI knives and 2 of the new Global NI (7"-8") knives.
Also own 4 Zwilling Twin Cuisine knives. Love them all. But now looking for some slightly more upscale knives. Just because I want to, no explanation needed  Biggrin

For some far too many knives, for others just about adequate.
I like variety in my kitchen, and I'm a gear nut with all the stuff I take an interest in.

What I would like to add to my collection is 3-4 of the top quality steel Japanese type kitchen knives, a Santoku, a Gyuto and a Nakiri plus a utility knife.

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 05-27-2017, 05:31 PM
#11
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About 13-14 years ago I did a short stint selling cutco knives. They are made from high carbon stainless steel, the same material used for surgical instruments. The handle are fairly ergonomic for lefties and righties and are made from the same material bowling balls are made of. They have a full length tang for balance and are triple riveted. The entire knife is guaranteed forever with no receipt required. Not life, forever, as in you can hand them down to your kids and still enjoy peace of mind in the warranty. I've experienced this warranty when my gf at the time found some in her drawers 20-30 years old with one being chipped from opening a paint can and the others needing sharpening as well. We sent them in, only paying shipping and they sent back brand new knives with no questions asked. Given your location the warranty isn't quite as appealing as it is in the states but needless to say they stand behind their products and warranty.

Their paring and chef knives , boning knives etc have your typical grind. However there are some knives like steak knife with a patended grind. This grind looks similar to a serrated knife but cuts much differently. Serrated knives tear the food, while these other grinds I believe it was a double d edge or something of that sort makes a clean cut due to the 90 degree angles.

After my experience with that brand I would have no issue recomending their products if your willing to spend the money on a high quality set.

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 05-27-2017, 06:14 PM
#12
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"In our kitchen, my bride of 45 years and I share cooking duties, and we use perhaps a dozen different knives regularly, but not equally.  My wife, born and raised in Japan, uses one knife, a Brazilian 6-inch-plus utility knife, forged from relatively soft steel, but with a gently curved edge, so it is neither German style nor French style, for at least 90 percent, probably closer to 95 percent, of her knifework, from boning to slicing to dicing, whatever."  by Mel S Meles


I love this, it speaks volumes.  Cannot find who to attribute this to but it reminds me of a quote: "It's a poor craftsman that blames his tools".  Awesome.

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 05-28-2017, 11:35 AM
#13
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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FWIW, I stumbled upon an intelligent discussion of the very matters discussed in this thread buried as a tangential frolic within a reddit entry about white wines.  https://www.reddit.com/r/AskCulinary/com...hite_wine/  (The tangent starts with a fairly damning dissection of an article written by Daniel Gritzer.)

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 05-28-2017, 11:47 AM
#14
  • Steelman
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  • Delaware
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(05-27-2017, 05:31 PM)Safelysimpson Wrote: About 13-14 years ago I did a short stint selling cutco knives. They are made from high carbon stainless steel, the same material used for surgical instruments. The handle are fairly ergonomic for lefties and righties and are made from the same material bowling balls are made of. They have a full length tang for balance and are triple riveted. The entire knife is guaranteed forever with no receipt required. Not life, forever, as in you can hand them down to your kids and still enjoy peace of mind in the warranty. I've experienced this warranty when my gf at the time found some in her drawers 20-30 years old with one being chipped from opening a paint can and the others needing sharpening as well. We sent them in, only paying shipping and they sent back brand new knives with no questions asked. Given your location the warranty isn't quite as appealing as it is in the states but needless to say they stand behind their products and warranty.

Their paring and chef knives , boning knives etc have your typical grind. However there are some knives like steak knife with a patended grind. This grind looks similar to a serrated knife but cuts much differently. Serrated knives tear the food, while these other grinds I believe it was a double d edge or something of that sort makes a clean cut due to the 90 degree angles.

After my experience with that brand I would have no issue recomending their products if your willing to spend the money on a high quality set.

My parents used Cutco knives most of their lives. They gifted a set of Cutco knives to me and my bride 19 years ago. 

We still use that same set. Still sharp as ever. 

Incidentally, my parents still use theirs. 

Not ground breaking or flashy. But for general kitchen duties I give them my highest recommendation.

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 05-28-2017, 01:19 PM
#15
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I have a J A Henkels set - not their highest quality ones, but not their 'entry level' either.  
They keep a good edge.  We like them

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 05-28-2017, 02:35 PM
#16
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(05-28-2017, 11:47 AM)Steelman Wrote:
(05-27-2017, 05:31 PM)Safelysimpson Wrote: About 13-14 years ago I did a short stint selling cutco knives. They are made from high carbon stainless steel, the same material used for surgical instruments. The handle are fairly ergonomic for lefties and righties and are made from the same material bowling balls are made of. They have a full length tang for balance and are triple riveted. The entire knife is guaranteed forever with no receipt required. Not life, forever, as in you can hand them down to your kids and still enjoy peace of mind in the warranty. I've experienced this warranty when my gf at the time found some in her drawers 20-30 years old with one being chipped from opening a paint can and the others needing sharpening as well. We sent them in, only paying shipping and they sent back brand new knives with no questions asked. Given your location the warranty isn't quite as appealing as it is in the states but needless to say they stand behind their products and warranty.

Their paring and chef knives , boning knives etc have your typical grind. However there are some knives like steak knife with a patended grind. This grind looks similar to a serrated knife but cuts much differently. Serrated knives tear the food, while these other grinds I believe it was a double d edge or something of that sort makes a clean cut due to the 90 degree angles.

After my experience with that brand I would have no issue recomending their products if your willing to spend the money on a high quality set.

My parents used Cutco knives most of their lives. They gifted a set of Cutco knives to me and my bride 19 years ago. 

We still use that same set. Still sharp as ever. 

Incidentally, my parents still use theirs. 

Not ground breaking or flashy. But for general kitchen duties I give them my highest recommendation.

Thats a very nice gift, Ron! I feel the same way, they aren't designed as flashy and over the top, just good old american made quality by a company that stands behind their product. I turned a few friends and neighbors onto them as well. One family friend actually visited the factory later on and bought more.

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 05-29-2017, 03:54 PM
#17
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We have a decent-sized set of Victorinox/Forschner Fibrox knives. They're inexpensive, have grippy handles, and hold an edge very well.  We bought a set for most of our relatives, so we don't have to use bad knives when we visit.

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 05-31-2017, 05:46 AM
#18
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I am still a happy go lucky Cutco guy... :-)


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 05-31-2017, 08:29 AM
#19
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For your needs I'd consider Bark River Knives - Kitchen Petty Z. 
They have some stunning wooden handles, but also an assortment of other materials.

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 05-31-2017, 09:18 AM
#20
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(05-31-2017, 05:46 AM)carlospppena Wrote: I am still a happy go lucky Cutco guy... :-)


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Nothing wrong with CUTCO.  I have a nice assortment of top tier knives and my CUTCO ones get regular use.  One of the knives that gets the most use in my kitchen is the 4 7/8" Trimmer model with the Double-D edge blade.  It's quite the versatile workhorse.

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