05-31-2017, 01:32 PM
#21
User Info
(05-29-2017, 03:54 PM)Shannon Wrote: We have a decent-sized set of Victorinox/Forschner Fibrox knives. They're inexpensive, have grippy handles, and hold an edge very well.  We bought a set for most of our relatives, so we don't have to use bad knives when we visit.

Brian, that's what I have too. They don't break the bank, have great steel, and excellent handles that aren't slippery even when wet. I sharpen them to the 15° angle and they are excellent. Of course I have other knives but the Forschner Fibrox is what my hand reaches for 99% of the time. For slicing I use a Mundial 14" granton edge slicer, again, sharpened to the 15° angle. I have no idea if the handle is slippery when wet because I never have wet hands when I'm slicing a roast or a brisket. I was given a Gerber carving set and that's superb also, but I mostly don't remember to use it. I even forgot to convert it over to 15° but I should.

I find a good sharpener is the key to knives, assuming good steel and handle. In the past I used a carbide sharpener, but they remove a great deal of metal to get the job done and that wears out the knife prematurely. Today I use a Chef's Choice Trizor XV. The wife needed something to give me for Christmas last year that she could afford and I mentioned that. I highly recommend it, but it only does the 15° angle. I highly recommend that angle also, but if the steel is junk no angle will turn it into a good knife. Some knives can take hours to convert to 15°; most don't take that long however. Depending on the knife a large amount of steel might need to be removed but don't despair. After converting to 15° that never needs to be done again. FWIW, the Victorinox when new had a 15° angle.

32 6,497
Reply
 05-31-2017, 03:39 PM
#22
User Info
(05-31-2017, 09:18 AM)TheLegalRazor Wrote:
(05-31-2017, 05:46 AM)carlospppena Wrote: I am still a happy go lucky Cutco guy... :-)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Nothing wrong with CUTCO.  I have a nice assortment of top tier knives and my CUTCO ones get regular use.  One of the knives that gets the most use in my kitchen is the 4 7/8" Trimmer model with the Double-D edge blade.  It's quite the versatile workhorse.


I agree 100%


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

0 479
Reply
 05-31-2017, 05:05 PM
#23
User Info
(05-31-2017, 01:32 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote:
(05-29-2017, 03:54 PM)Shannon Wrote: We have a decent-sized set of Victorinox/Forschner Fibrox knives. They're inexpensive, have grippy handles, and hold an edge very well.  We bought a set for most of our relatives, so we don't have to use bad knives when we visit.

Brian, that's what I have too. They don't break the bank, have great steel, and excellent handles that aren't slippery even when wet. I sharpen them to the 15° angle and they are excellent. Of course I have other knives but the Forschner Fibrox is what my hand reaches for 99% of the time. For slicing I use a Mundial 14" granton edge slicer, again, sharpened to the 15° angle. I have no idea if the handle is slippery when wet because I never have wet hands when I'm slicing a roast or a brisket. I was given a Gerber carving set and that's superb also, but I mostly don't remember to use it. I even forgot to convert it over to 15° but I should.

I find a good sharpener is the key to knives, assuming good steel and handle. In the past I used a carbide sharpener, but they remove a great deal of metal to get the job done and that wears out the knife prematurely. Today I use a Chef's Choice Trizor XV. The wife needed something to give me for Christmas last year that she could afford and I mentioned that. I highly recommend it, but it only does the 15° angle. I highly recommend that angle also, but if the steel is junk no angle will turn it into a good knife. Some knives can take hours to convert to 15°; most don't take that long however. Depending on the knife a large amount of steel might need to be removed but don't despair. After converting to 15° that never needs to be done again. FWIW, the Victorinox when new had a 15° angle.

We've got a Chef's Choice sharpener, but we rarely have to use it, even using the chef's and paring knives daily. Most of the time, a few swipes on a steel will do the trick.

0 1,142
Reply
 06-01-2017, 04:52 AM
#24
User Info
A lesser known brand is Lamson Sharp out of Massachusetts.  They are German steel and of great quality.  I have the rosewood handles and absolutely love them.  A little lighter and better balanced than Henkels.  They are also one of the cheaper options.  Also MUCH better than Cutco.  I am trying to dump my Cutco block if anyone is interested...

0 309
Reply
 06-01-2017, 05:11 AM
#25
User Info
(05-27-2017, 01:15 PM)CHSeifert Wrote: What I would like to add to my collection is 3-4 of the top quality steel Japanese type kitchen knives, a Santoku, a Gyuto and a Nakiri plus a utility knife.


I can recommend Watanabe knives.
http://watanabeblade.com/english/pro/index.htm

I have a few of them: the Santoku, the Gyuto, a Nakiri, a Sabaki, a Negikiri and the petty knife.

[Image: kurouchis.jpg]

Watanabe offers quite a few nice options:


Quote:Custom blade modifications:

Togidashi finished blades adds about 30% Available on single beveled blades only.
Mirror polished blades adds about 50%
Honyaki adds about 110%
Kintarou ame steel adds about 120%
Left handed adds about 40%


The Ho wood sheath (Saya) adds about $70.00 - $140.00

You may want to think about the length for the knives; I choose my Santoku short and the Gyuto long for more versatility.
Also, you will have the choice of quality in steel (I bought the petite knives in damascus, the others are in Hitachi Blue #2 and White #2).

I know that mr Watanabe also has a choice in western style handles.

0 674
Reply
 06-01-2017, 11:36 PM
#26
User Info
I just added 4 of the Miyabi 6000 MCT knives to my collection. Rockwell 63, SG2 steel, nice heft and a handle that fits my hands. Only issue is the wooden handle. But the Miyabi chief of sales told me not to worry, as long as I never leave the knife in the sink, which you should not do anyway......

Chefs knife 20cm & 16cm
Santoku 18 cm
Rocking santoku 18 cm

[Image: 2fad85580c0b702080a0473f806cdd2d.jpg]

[Image: 6a67977e8e14bc3535bdc6e95a04f96a.jpg]

25 6,248
Reply
 06-02-2017, 07:32 AM
#27
User Info
(06-01-2017, 11:36 PM)CHSeifert Wrote: I just added 4 of the Miyabi 6000 MCT knives to my collection. Rockwell 63, SG2 steel, nice heft and a handle that fits my hands. Only issue is the wooden handle. But the Miyabi chief of sales told me not to worry, as long as I never leave the knife in the sink, which you should not do anyway......

Chefs knife 20cm & 16cm
Santoku 18 cm
Rocking santoku 18 cm

[Image: 2fad85580c0b702080a0473f806cdd2d.jpg]

[Image: 6a67977e8e14bc3535bdc6e95a04f96a.jpg]


Mindblowing!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

0 479
Reply
 06-02-2017, 03:52 PM
#28
User Info
(06-02-2017, 07:32 AM)carlospppena Wrote:
(06-01-2017, 11:36 PM)CHSeifert Wrote: I just added 4 of the Miyabi 6000 MCT knives to my collection. Rockwell 63, SG2 steel, nice heft and a handle that fits my hands. Only issue is the wooden handle. But the Miyabi chief of sales told me not to worry, as long as I never leave the knife in the sink, which you should not do anyway......

Chefs knife 20cm & 16cm
Santoku 18 cm
Rocking santoku 18 cm

[Image: 2fad85580c0b702080a0473f806cdd2d.jpg]

[Image: 6a67977e8e14bc3535bdc6e95a04f96a.jpg]


Mindblowing!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Thanks/Gracias, my friend !

25 6,248
Reply
 06-02-2017, 08:23 PM
#29
User Info
(05-26-2017, 07:11 PM)CHSeifert Wrote: So what knives do you own ?

Do you plan on adding further knives to your collection?

I'm looking to get 3-4 knivs from a brand that sells SG2 high quality knives, but don't like wooden handles in my kitchen knives and don't like most of the Mikata handles I've seen.

Looking into getting some Kai, Misono or Mac knives.

I came close to buying 3 Miyabi 5000MCD 67 knives, but the wooden handle made me unsure.
My GF often places my expensive knives in the kitchen sink, even though I tell her NOT TO.

Let me hear what your favourite knives are !?

Wusthof Ikon

No. I wanted one and done and so far they've exceeded expectations. Had a Messermeister 8" in college. Handle broke. Lost a 10" Wusthof Trident. So far, haven't lost these, so until they break or I lose them, they're going to be with me for life. No complaints about them at all.

I don't like that wood can soak up bacteria. Knowing what I know now, I look on wood as a potential bacteria pit.

Get the one that fits your hand the best. That's my best advice.

9 3,048
Reply
 02-25-2018, 04:08 PM
#30
User Info
Right now, I have 8 SHUN + 4 SHUN steak knives (made by Kai the same as the Kai Razor blades) 2 Kai and 1 ENSO . I do all the cooking and prefer the Japanese style knives over all others. Really love the Damascus blades.

0 505
Reply
 02-25-2018, 09:01 PM
#31
User Info
(06-01-2017, 11:36 PM)CHSeifert Wrote: I just added 4 of the Miyabi 6000 MCT knives to my collection...

Hey Claus, how are you liking the Miyabi? Do they hold an edge well? I’m looking for a couple replacements and aligned on similar choices:

- MAC Knives pro series 
- Misono UX10 
- Yaxxell enso hd
- Miyabi SG2 Mizu (which is the same blade as your artists series, but different handle)

I’m leaning toward the Miyabi (pictured below) or the Misono.

[Image: 33669.jpg]

29 1,412
Reply
 02-26-2018, 07:33 AM
#32
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
User Info
(06-02-2017, 08:23 PM)WetShavingProducts Wrote: I don't like that wood can soak up bacteria. Knowing what I know now, I look on wood as a potential bacteria pit.

In fact, there is some fairly substantial evidence, based about academic studies, that wood actually kills kitchen bacteria.  Use your favorite search engine to look up Dean O. Cliver (who is, or at least was when he published:  he died in 2011) a member of the faculty of the University of Calilifornia at Davis; see, e.g., http://faculty.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/facult...gboard.htm.  Cliver’s research, and later studies at the University of Wisconsin, were directed to cutting boards (wood vs. plastic), but the rationale should carry over to other kitchen surfaces, such as knife handles.  In commercial applications (restaurant and hospital kitchens), where for sterilization cutting boards and knives can be, and are, cleaned in very hot water, or even autoclaves, wood is, of course contra-indicated; but for a typical kitchen knife that is washed by hand (in water that is not hot enough to burn hands) to avoid the damage that can occur to the blade and its edge inside a dishwasher, I think I should feel more comfortable with the sanitation of a wood-handle knife than I should with a metal-handle knife that (to avoid slippage) has a knurled or otherwise textured surface with tiny nooks and crannies that are difficult to clean completely with hand-washing techniques.

1 1,214
Reply
 02-26-2018, 06:37 PM
#33
User Info
(02-26-2018, 07:33 AM)Mel S Meles Wrote:
(06-02-2017, 08:23 PM)WetShavingProducts Wrote: I don't like that wood can soak up bacteria. Knowing what I know now, I look on wood as a potential bacteria pit.

In fact, there is some fairly substantial evidence, based about academic studies, that wood actually kills kitchen bacteria.  Use your favorite search engine to look up Dean O. Cliver (who is, or at least was when he published:  he died in 2011) a member of the faculty of the University of Calilifornia at Davis; see, e.g., http://faculty.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/facult...gboard.htm.  Cliver’s research, and later studies at the University of Wisconsin, were directed to cutting boards (wood vs. plastic), but the rationale should carry over to other kitchen surfaces, such as knife handles.  In commercial applications (restaurant and hospital kitchens), where for sterilization cutting boards and knives can be, and are, cleaned in very hot water, or even autoclaves, wood is, of course contra-indicated; but for a typical kitchen knife that is washed by hand (in water that is not hot enough to burn hands) to avoid the damage that can occur to the blade and its edge inside a dishwasher, I think I should feel more comfortable with the sanitation of a wood-handle knife than I should with a metal-handle knife that (to avoid slippage) has a knurled or otherwise textured surface with tiny nooks and crannies that are difficult to clean completely with hand-washing techniques.

As usual a very wise post from this Gentleman !

25 6,248
Reply
 02-26-2018, 06:57 PM
#34
User Info
(02-25-2018, 09:01 PM)mike_the_kraken Wrote:
(06-01-2017, 11:36 PM)CHSeifert Wrote: I just added 4 of the Miyabi 6000 MCT knives to my collection...

Hey Claus, how are you liking the Miyabi? Do they hold an edge well? I’m looking for a couple replacements and aligned on similar choices:

- MAC Knives pro series 
- Misono UX10 
- Yaxxell enso hd
- Miyabi SG2 Mizu (which is the same blade as your artists series, but different handle)

I’m leaning toward the Miyabi (pictured below) or the Misono.

[Image: 33669.jpg]

Hey there,

I now own 8 Miyabi Artisan SG2 knives and 8 Wüsthof Classic ikon Creme knives.
I use the Wüsthof for the rougher tasks in the kitchen and the Miyabi for the fines more delicate touches.

Even though the Miyabi SG2 is Rockwell 63 in hardness and Wüsthof Classic Ikon is only 58-59 on the Rockwell hardness scale, there can be too much of good thing when it comes to hardness.

My Miyabi Artisan SG2 hold their edge EXTEMELY well, since they are 63 on the Rockwell scale, but I strop my knives daily before I use them in my kitchen.
I strop my Miyabi Artisan on a leather strop block and my Wüsthof Classic Ikon on a honing rod.
On top of that I also own 3 Miyabi wetstones, which I use for sharpening all my knives once or twice yearly.

The Miyabi wetstones are rebranded Naniwa Chosera, Naniwa Chosera are widely acknowledged as one of the best wetstones you can buy for money.

While the Miyabi Artisan knives are very hard and very sharp, you need to avoid thinking they can cut everything, because they can't.
If you cut into frozen meat or bones, you risk the blade will chip on you, while if you do the same with the softer steel Wüsthof Classic Ikon, chances are the blade will just bend instead of chipping, because the Wüsthof is a softer steel.

So if you don't use you head before you use the knife, you risk chipping the blade instead of just bending it.

With that said, if you avoid cutting into really tough hard things, the Miyabi Artisan knives are a dream to use.
I love the Miyabi Artisan wooden curved thick handle and the blade is just a work of art.

Also owned 3 Miyabi Birchwood, and they share the same handle design as the Mizu, but in natural Birchwood.
The Birchwood handle was a bit too thin for my hands and the Birchwood knives are far too lightweight for my preferences.

This is why I bought 8 Miyabi Artisan knives.

I use my Wüsthof Classic ikon Creme knives just as often as my Miyabi Artisan, because the Wüsthof are a bit more rugged and less prone to chipping.
But as said the Miyabi Artisan knives are works of art and perform fantastic too.

My warm recommendations for the Miyabi Artisan. I haven't hold the Mizu in hand, but I can vouch for the blade, as it's identical in both models.
The blade of the Birchwood is also 63 on the Rockwell hardness scale, but has a slightly thinner profile and no air pockets, so potatoes tend to stick a bit more with the Birchwood.

All in all I think it's amazing for my wallet, that the Artisan is priced 30-40% lower than the Birchwood, when it to me in all aspects is the better knife: Performance wise, feel wise and look wise - WIN WIN WIN !!

25 6,248
Reply
 02-26-2018, 10:10 PM
#35
User Info
I got the Misuno. It is a high precision tool. The blade is a bit small for every day use for my liking. I can slice thin and long slices very precisely with the misuno. Very nice knife.

9 1,395
Reply
 02-26-2018, 10:27 PM
#36
User Info
(02-26-2018, 10:10 PM)lloydrm Wrote: I got the Misuno. It is a high precision tool. The blade is a bit small for every day use for my liking. I can slice thin and long slices very precisely with the misuno. Very nice knife.


Misono UX10 is a very nice knife, unfortunately for me it is too light and the handle is on the smaller side and the handle was not quite a 10/10 quality wise.
But it’s a fantastic knife, no doubt.

For my larger hands and delicate eyes the Miyabi Artisan beat it.
The Miyabi Artisan will hold its edge far longer than the Misono UX10, 63 Rockwell versus 59 Rockwell hardness tells the story.

25 6,248
Reply
 02-27-2018, 10:02 AM
#37
User Info
(02-26-2018, 10:27 PM)CHSeifert Wrote:
(02-26-2018, 10:10 PM)lloydrm Wrote: I got the Misuno. It is a high precision tool. The blade is a bit small for every day use for my liking. I can slice thin and long slices very precisely with the misuno. Very nice knife.


Misono UX10 is a very nice knife, unfortunately for me it is too light and the handle is on the smaller side and the handle was not quite a 10/10 quality wise.
But it’s a fantastic knife, no doubt.

For my larger hands and delicate eyes the Mizuno Artisan beat it.
The Miyabi Artisan will hold its edge far longer than the Misono UX10, 63 Rockwell versus 59 Rockwell hardness tells the story.

I agree with you. The handle is small as well. Your Miyabi looks more like something I would like because of the handle size, blade width and curvy shape.
I guess that's what I get for buying online without holding knifes on my hand. Maybe I'll get the Miyabi Smile

9 1,395
Reply
 02-27-2018, 01:12 PM
#38
User Info
[Image: 04mZKtm.jpg]
Might I suggest Enso (bottom knife) Top knife is a Shun.  Enso are quite reasonable and quality is high.
I prefer Shun because of the lifetime warranty and free sharpening for life.

0 505
Reply
 02-27-2018, 07:15 PM
#39
User Info
(02-27-2018, 01:12 PM)zipper Wrote: [Image: 04mZKtm.jpg]
Might I suggest Enso (bottom knife) Top knife is a Shun.  Enso are quite reasonable and quality is high.
I prefer Shun because of the lifetime warranty and free sharpening for life.

I considered both the Enso as well as the Shun.
Enso because it’s made by Yaxell.
Shun because it’s made by KAI, maker of the excellent KAI DE razor blades.

Let me tell you why I dumped both.

Enso is a downsized quality blade compared to Yaxell Gou 101, so here I would buy Yaxell Gou 101, a superior performer. Same handle, inferior blade.

Shun Classic is an overpriced VG10 blade with a handle similar to Miyabi Artisan, but with an inferior blade.
Pretty much all Shun knives I’ve seen are vastly overpriced and greatly underperforming blade wise compared to Miyabi in the same price category.

25 6,248
Reply
 02-27-2018, 07:28 PM
#40
User Info
I have a set of Henckels knives ranging from 10" chef's on down that have been going strong for 40 years. I have two Mac 8" chef's knives that are a mere 33 years old. Granted, this doesn't say much about the current quality of these brands, but if you can find NOS versions from this generation, I'd say give it a go. Wink

0 146
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)