06-18-2017, 03:43 PM
#1
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I had some extra time today, so I spent a little time in the shop.

I wanted to make a razor stand for my new Rocnel SE-G.  I didn't have a way to titanium coat it to match.  I didn't want it to be made of stainless or brass.  So I decided to make it out of 1018 steel and then bead-blast it - then I parkerized it.  The parkerizing solution is a manganeze phosphate - it doesn't match exaclty, as it has a little greenish tint to it, but I knew that zinc phosphate would have been worse (too light)

I also decided to mill 6 flats in the bottom base ring.  I milled little counting pips on the flats ... blank, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5.  This serves as a blade usage counter.  Load a new blade and rotate the stand so the blank is facing out.  Shave, and rotate the stand to the 1 then on, and on.  So it counts 5 usages and that's what I like out of my blade before I put in a new one.  

This is how it came out.

[Image: hMFiK84.jpg]

[Image: nSpEbT8.jpg]

[Image: oj1QFw0.jpg]

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 06-18-2017, 03:45 PM
#2
  • eengler
  • Administrator
  • South Dakota, USA
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Well done! Clever shave counter.

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 06-18-2017, 03:47 PM
#3
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That came out great, and the counting marks are ingenious.

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 06-18-2017, 03:51 PM
#4
  • Sully
  • Super Moderator
  • Cedar Park, Texas
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That is awesome!  The shave tracker is a nice touch.

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 06-18-2017, 03:53 PM
#5
  • clint64
  • Senior Member
  • Atlanta, GA
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Very well done.

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 06-18-2017, 04:27 PM
#6
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Outstanding!  The shave counter is genius!

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 06-18-2017, 04:35 PM
#7
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(06-18-2017, 03:47 PM)TheLegalRazor Wrote: That came out great, and the counting marks are ingenious.

Signs011

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 06-18-2017, 04:37 PM
#8
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You taking any orders? I'd love to have one for my rocnel!


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 06-18-2017, 05:05 PM
#9
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looks very good

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 06-18-2017, 05:24 PM
#10
  • pbrmhl
  • Active Member
  • Seattle
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That is amazing, especially the blade counter. You should consider going into business. Whether you do or not, I suspect someone will copy your idea... Even so, you seem to have a knack for clever ideas--you've likely got more up your sleeve!

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 06-18-2017, 06:37 PM
#11
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Excellent work! For all the forum geeks like me, please share your approach, equipment and process. Pictures are always best! Smile

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 06-18-2017, 06:47 PM
#12
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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Very nice! There would definitely be a market for a stand like this.

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 06-18-2017, 06:48 PM
#13
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Ditto. That is beautiful. Nicely done

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 06-18-2017, 07:21 PM
#14
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(06-18-2017, 06:37 PM)TexBilly Wrote: Excellent work! For all the forum geeks like me, please share your approach, equipment and process. Pictures are always best! Smile

Signs011

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 06-19-2017, 01:33 AM
#15
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(06-18-2017, 06:37 PM)TexBilly Wrote: Excellent work! For all the forum geeks like me, please share your approach, equipment and process. Pictures are always best! Smile

Thanks for kind words everyone.  I am not taking orders (sorry) and I didn't take any photos during the making of this ... but here is my basement shop

[Image: rev2FgX.jpg]

On the left is a Boyar Schultz surface frinder, a Enco (Chinese) 12x36 metal lathe in the center, and a Bridgeport (round ram) M head vertical milling machine on the right.  
The lathe is single-phase 220v and both the milling machine and grinder take 220v three-phase power - so on the floor between the lathe and mill sits a rotary phase converter I made out of a 5hp three phase motor.
The lathe is sort of cheap and I wouldn't use it in the aerospace field .... but it gets the job done.  People on machining forums didn't believe me that I can't set my tool rest to 35 degrees, but I can set it to 30 twice .... till I showed them!

[Image: ObRdjKt.jpg]  

Ahhhhh - the quality control of the Enco facility ... gotta love it  Smile

As for my approach ... I had some 1.5" 1018 mild steel round bar in the stock pile and I chucked it up in the lathe.
I faced it and drilled a center hole of .500" about 1.200" deep.  Then I put on a boring bar and bored it out to .548"  That's about right for the Rocnel handle.
I put on the cut-off tool and scored it at 1.375" establishing the overall length.  Then I went back 1/4" and plunged in a round-nose bit to make a decorative groove.
I originally set my rest at 30 degrees (the actual 30 degrees) and started my taper.  I realized that would be too shallow and moved it to 20 degrees.  Then a lot of files and 320 grit sandpaper later ... I re-installed the parting tool and went back to my old score line and finished parting off the piece. Since this isn't - and doesn't need to be - precision ... I cleaned up the bottom of the base on a belt sander.

Then over to the mill.  I put it in the vise sideways sitting on a parallel.  Once I milled the first flat I rotated 180 degrees and did the second one.  I then marked the bottom with lay-out dye, and set my protractor head combination square to 60 degrees and scored some reference lines.  I really did eye-ball those lines to the top of the vise to set my other flats ... like I said - at that point it didn't need to be precision.  Once I had all 6 flats, I cleaned off the machine marks to 400 grit and then put the piece back on the mill for the 'pips' to be the blade use counter.  

After all that was done, I put it in the sandblast cabinet while the parkerizing heated up.  I gave it a good sand-blast ... and then sprayed it with brake cleaner.  Then a nice warm 190 degree bath of the park solution for about two minutes ... rinse with water ... into a post treatment solution, then wipe off, and finish with a silicon cloth.  

All that took on the order of 90 minutes to two hours ... and I expect someone with a CNC turning station could pop them out one after another in less than 5 min each!  That's the difference between manual machining and CNC machining.

I am planning on making a nice titanium razor handle - re-purposing really.  It is on the way to me now.  It is coming from China and this is what it looks like now
[Image: wKxTkxa.jpg]

It is a titanium kubaton .... and they cost about 30.00 with shipping ... and the majority of the machine work is done for me!  .... so I'll turn the key-ring-end into the bottom and the pointed end into the threaded portion and make a bamboo style razor handle from Ti for less than I can buy any titanium razor handle on the market.

I'll take photos as I go and post a different thread about the re-purposing of this kubaton to a razor handle - when I finally get it.

Thanks again for the kind words.

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 06-19-2017, 02:57 AM
#16
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I would kill for a nice little workshop like that, and my Better Half would kill me if I went out and got all those tools - partly because I would have to take over the living room Wink

Looking forward to reading your next adventure Biggrin

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 06-19-2017, 03:22 AM
#17
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That is one impressive home workshop.  Thanks for sharing and keep us posted on your other projects.  Those that don't relate to shaving can go in  The Parlor section.

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 06-19-2017, 03:36 AM
#18
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I was on a gun 'silencer' forum and a lot of people want to make their own (legally with all the paperwork) to 'save money' and I would tell them ... first pick up a used lathe for 1500.00 to 2500.00 ... then spend about the same amount in tooling and quality measuring and layout equipment.  Then your first suppressor (which would have cost you 800.00 to a grand) will have cost you thousands more than you could have bought one for ... and it will likely be inferior to a commercial one too!

I have the machines - not to make razors, razor handles, or stands (or suppressors) but because I like metalworking.  There is something near to 'primal' to taking a hunk of metal and welding, beating, and machining it to make something else out of it!  I'd love to start forging ... but that's a whole new skill set to learn ... and more stuff to buy!

Once you DO have the machines ... you will see projects everywhere!  So - be cautious before you go down this road!

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 06-19-2017, 03:40 AM
#19
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Very beautiful. 
Bravo

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 06-19-2017, 05:12 AM
#20
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Eagle, I really enjoyed your "tour" and your approach to making your stand.  I can certainly relate to the "have tool, find a project" idea!  Enjoy that excellent shop.

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