06-20-2017, 03:20 PM
#1
User Info
I have noticed that my newly acquired silvertip takes longer to dry out that my best badger or my boar. Has anyone else noticed that silvertips have a longer drying time?

0 89
Reply
 06-20-2017, 04:04 PM
#2
User Info
Using a slightly damp brush for your next shave wouldn't negatively affect your lather since you'll soak or wet your brush before use, and I doubt hair grade has an affect on drying time, knot size and density would on the other-hand.

1 181
Reply
 06-20-2017, 07:34 PM
#3
User Info
(06-20-2017, 04:04 PM)TommyGuns59 Wrote: Using a slightly damp brush for your next shave wouldn't negatively affect your lather since you'll soak or wet your brush before use, and I doubt hair grade has an affect on drying time, knot size and density would on the other-hand.

Agreed, and particularly as to density.

51 6,436
Reply
 06-20-2017, 10:38 PM
#4
User Info
I could see how a denser or larger knot made of silver tip would take possibly more time than other brushes but by the time I am done shaking out the brush, I would say I have it about 50% there to be totally dry.

If you would like to share what you do after your shave to your brush? That may help to see if there's is some way you can adjust treating the knot and encourage it to dry faster.

82 1,374
Reply
 06-21-2017, 02:54 AM
#5
User Info
(06-20-2017, 10:38 PM)zaclikestoshave Wrote: I could see how a denser or larger knot made of silver tip would take possibly more time than other brushes but by the time I am done shaking out the brush, I would say I have it about 50% there to be totally dry.

If you would like to share what you do after your shave to your brush? That may help to see if there's is some way you can adjust treating the knot and encourage it to dry faster.

Good point.  Gently shaking out excess water, then stroping the brush on a towel, will get rid of much of the water.

51 6,436
Reply
 06-21-2017, 03:11 AM
#6
User Info
Silvertip brushes have thinner hairs.

Super badger with 2-band and boars have thicker hairs.

Thinner hairs, tightly packed=longer drying time

24 6,019
Reply
 06-21-2017, 03:23 AM
#7
User Info
(06-21-2017, 03:11 AM)CHSeifert Wrote: Silvertip brushes have thinner hairs.

Super badger with 2-band and boars have thicker hairs.

Thinner hairs, tightly packed=longer drying time

I was thinking this myself. But the difference is probably so minuscule as to not even really be a difference.

84 1,505
Reply
 06-21-2017, 12:51 PM
#8
User Info
I towel dry my badgers after use, try paint brush strokes on a dry towel for a much faster drying time

2 465
Reply
 06-21-2017, 01:18 PM
#9
User Info
It's not really a problem. By morning it's dry.

0 89
Reply
 06-21-2017, 01:34 PM
#10
User Info
The only appreciable drying difference I see from my badgers is with super dense knots, usually best or silvertip (as implied above).  The absolute King of these is my Simpson Chubby 2 in Best Badger.  That brush takes a long time to rinse and dry.

73 4,338
Reply
 06-21-2017, 11:44 PM
#11
User Info
(06-21-2017, 01:34 PM)TexBilly Wrote: The only appreciable drying difference I see from my badgers is with super dense knots, usually best or silvertip (as implied above).  The absolute King of these is my Simpson Chubby 2 in Best Badger.  That brush takes a long time to rinse and dry.

Exactly.

To prove my point:

My Chubby 2 Super 3-band, which essentially is Silvertip thinner hairs, took far longer to dry than my Chubby 2 Best 3-band, which again took longer to dry than my Chubby 2 2-Band, which again took longer to dry than my Chubby 2 Manchurian.

FYI Now sold all my Chubby 2's for handle size too small reasons.

24 6,019
Reply
 06-22-2017, 05:19 AM
#12
User Info
(06-21-2017, 03:11 AM)CHSeifert Wrote: Silvertip brushes have thinner hairs.

Super badger with 2-band and boars have thicker hairs.

Thinner hairs, tightly packed=longer drying time

I completely agree with this conclusion.  Also, it won't harm your brush to re-use it while still slightly damp.  After all, our fathers (grandfathers) often only owned one brush; so complete drying, as we understand it, was a sometime thing (and yes, their brushes were most often smaller; so drying time was faster, but that's another conversation Smile .)  One caveat I would offer is to periodically allow your brush to dry completely--often 48-72 hours, depending on the environment in which it's kept.

4 647
Reply
 07-19-2017, 10:58 AM
#13
User Info
(06-21-2017, 01:34 PM)TexBilly Wrote: The only appreciable drying difference I see from my badgers is with super dense knots, usually best or silvertip (as implied above).  The absolute King of these is my Simpson Chubby 2 in Best Badger.  That brush takes a long time to rinse and dry.

Signs011

0 52
Reply
 07-19-2017, 05:02 PM
#14
User Info
I was going to post a new thread, but this one appeared and works just fine.
Lee from WSP has Brush Care in this weeks Newsletter http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?u=7cc5...9b94859e82 
Check out the advice on drying and gentlemen let's hear your views!
RON

0 195
Reply
 07-19-2017, 05:17 PM
#15
User Info
(07-19-2017, 05:02 PM)RetroRon Wrote: I was going to post a new thread, but this one appeared and works just fine.
Lee from WSP has Brush Care in this weeks Newsletter http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?u=7cc5...9b94859e82 
Check out the advice on drying and gentlemen let's hear your views!
RON

I agree with Lee's advice.  I stand my brushes under the tap and run water into them for quite a while.  I then pick up the brush and run water all around the knot.  After gently shaking the brush and stropping it on a towel, I stand it to dry.

51 6,436
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)