06-22-2017, 10:09 AM
#1
  • Wayjr
  • Member
  • Kennesaw, GA
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This has been discussed before in other threads, but I think that it would be good to revisit it. I have learned many things as I have been wet shaving.
Here are a few things that I have learned.
1. Time is your friend. Take the time to properly shave. This means properly prepping your face/neck, shaving, and then applying post shave. If you are don't have the time, use ac cartridge razor. You'll save your face/neck from being shredded.
2. Properly lather the soap or cream. Get enough soap/cream to get on your brush for a good lather. Then, using the brush work the soap/cream into a thick frothy lather so that it will protect your face.
3. Go slow. It doesn't matter if you make one pass or four. The slower you go the better the shave and less of a chance that you'll cut yourself.
4. Use aftershave. After all in the end, your scraping a metal razor across your face. Whether your preference is balm or splash, using an aftershave will moisturizer your face and help it heal.
5. Practice, Practice, Practice. The best way to improve your technique is by practicing. Practicing will also help you improve your lathering skills.

Wayne

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 06-22-2017, 10:18 AM
#2
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Thanks, Wayne, this is a good set of reminders for all of us.  Methods may differ but the fundamentals of a good shave are captured in your summary.  Well done!

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 09-07-2017, 08:30 PM
#3
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(06-22-2017, 10:09 AM)Wayjr Wrote: This has been discussed before in other threads, but I think that it would be good to revisit it. I have learned many things as I have been wet shaving.
Here are a few things that I have learned.
1.  Time is your friend. Take the time to properly shave. This means properly prepping your face/neck, shaving, and then applying post shave. If you are don't have the time, use ac cartridge razor. You'll save your face/neck from being shredded.
2.  Properly lather the soap or cream. Get enough soap/cream to get on your brush for a good lather. Then, using the brush work the soap/cream into a thick frothy lather so that it will protect your face.
3.  Go slow. It doesn't matter if you make one pass or four. The slower you go the better the shave and less of a chance that you'll cut yourself.
4. Use aftershave. After all in the end, your scraping a metal razor across your face.  Whether your preference is balm or splash, using an aftershave will moisturizer your face and help it heal.
5.  Practice, Practice, Practice.  The best way to improve your technique is by practicing. Practicing will also help you improve your lathering skills.

Wayne

Love your points. I would add "use no pressure!"

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 10-14-2017, 05:35 AM
#4
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I think the most important thing I've learned is to use the reduction method and not try to get BBS in one pass.

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 01-06-2018, 03:50 PM
#5
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Yep....that's pretty much the way I was taught.

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 01-07-2018, 06:07 AM
#6
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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That method worked for me for over 51 years.  Now I apply the same principals to my electric shaver whether I'm using an electric pre-shave or a good wet lather.

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 01-07-2018, 06:54 AM
#7
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Yes some very good information and facts here.

Roger



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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 07-16-2018, 03:31 PM
#8
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Great set of reminders

I used to watch my father shave in the mid 1960's, I was like 7 years old, he could have shaved with anything he desired like an expensive electric or whatnot, he chose a DE Gillette 
probably a Super Speed and Gillette Blue blades.
He did it using shave cream from a can like Gillette foamy lemon-lime or menthol, and it was simple and clean. 
His face always smooth to the touch and smelled nice too.

Take time
A good lather
Go slow
Use after shave

Sage words of advise, and how do you get to Carnegie Hall? Practice practice practice!

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 07-16-2018, 04:46 PM
#9
  • SCOV
  • Senior Member
  • Minnesota
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Good set of basics.   For me, thinking about the shave process and not just  mechanical steps was a big step.  I have started to notice the difference in brushes and razors.  A new & mild razor did shaved my neck difficult spots in the 1st pass today.  Practice, Practice, Practice is definitely important.

On a lighter note, I noticed money savings was not one of the things you learned about shaving.

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 07-23-2018, 12:55 PM
#10
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I have a Mùhle Rocca, and find that two passes are all I need using a very light touch both time. The least pressure upsets my skin! I could use more pressure with my now broken Edwin J..

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