06-27-2017, 08:09 PM
#1
  • Agravic
  • Emeritus
  • Pennsylvania, USA
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Thoughts?

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 06-28-2017, 01:58 AM
#2
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With RAW, in nearly every circumstance, you have control over every controllable element of the exposure. The downside is you have control over every aspect of the exposure. It can be daunting to attempt to nail everything from the white balance on down. But if you've invested in the gear and have the shutter bug, might as well leverage every advantage that file type offers to make the picture exactly as you want it.

If you're interested, I found many of the classes at Creative Live very helpful.

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 06-28-2017, 03:23 AM
#3
  • eengler
  • Administrator
  • South Dakota, USA
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I record both if its something important or if the lighting is tricky. Taking the time to get it right in camera saves me editing at the computer and allows the majority of my photos to be taken in jpeg and used straight from the camera. Jpegs prints well for me even into the larger sizes of canvas.

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 06-28-2017, 04:33 PM
#4
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Most cameras that offer RAW also offer RAW + jpeg as an option. Downside is that it takes up more space on your SD Card. If you plan on using an editing suite like Photoshop, Lightroom or Capture One (my fav), RAW is really the only way to go that takes advantage of the infinite possibilities those programs offer.
FWIW,
Ron

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 06-28-2017, 04:49 PM
#5
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RAW if you know what you're doing in post-prosessing, but jpeg in a modern shoot-and-scoot camera.

I used RAW exclusivly in my first digital camera, mostly because the firmware algorithm was overly lossy even for a lossy format. These days I use jpeg even in my DSLR, because the result is plenty good for me.

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 06-28-2017, 05:22 PM
#6
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It depends on many things, mostly if you are happy with the jpegs your camera produces. I used a Fuji X100S for a few years and the jpegs were terrific and it is possible to adjust them in camera. That being said I usually shot in jpeg + raw so I would have the option to correct certain flaws or to use film emulations in Lightroom. I'm now mostly shooting with a Leica Q and only record raw images. They take especially well to post processing in Lightroom or any other program.

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 06-28-2017, 05:39 PM
#7
  • evnpar
  • Emeritus
  • Portland, Oregon
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RAW, RAW, RAW.....

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 06-28-2017, 05:44 PM
#8
  • Agravic
  • Emeritus
  • Pennsylvania, USA
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Great feedback, everyone.
I've been using RAW with my Nikon D750, followed by Lightshop editing. It can be cumbersome at times, hence my curiosity about JPEG.

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 06-28-2017, 05:50 PM
#9
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Raw is great for the adjustability. When I switched to Sony i used Raw+JPEG and really was impressed with "out of camera" - it does noise reduction and sharpening for me.

But having RAW is fantastic when the scene wasn't perfectly or evenly lit or exposed.

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 07-16-2017, 12:35 PM
#10
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I realize that RAW + Lightroom is a cumbersome way to get to the final product, but it's the way I operate. Often I'll need to underexpose a photo intentionally just get get the shot I'm after. There are software programs that work in similar ways with JPEGs, but you don't have the range of information to work with that's available in RAW.

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 07-16-2017, 01:01 PM
#11
  • Agravic
  • Emeritus
  • Pennsylvania, USA
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Returning home tomorrow after two weeks in Portugal and Spain; I chose RAW + JPEG.
It'll take awhile to process/edit but worth the effort!

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 07-16-2017, 05:18 PM
#12
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A fun before/after to document where RAW comes in handy Smile

[Image: v7d3pzE.jpg]

For a zoomable option: http://imgur.com/a/YmymV

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 07-17-2017, 03:39 AM
#13
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(07-16-2017, 01:01 PM)Agravic Wrote: Returning home tomorrow after two weeks in Portugal and Spain; I chose RAW + JPEG.
It'll take awhile to process/edit but worth the effort!


Hope you liked Spain!!

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 08-26-2017, 12:05 PM
#14
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RAW for me.  I used to do RAW+JPEG but, with acquiring Lightroom, I shoot RAW only.  The main thing I like about editing files in Lightroom is that it is non-destructive.  Plus, Lightroom is a very powerful photo editor.  Once I finish editing in Lightroom, I have the option to export the photo as a JPEG file for further editing in Photoshop if desired.  Since the integrity of the original photo is maintained, it is available processing in Lightroom.

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 08-26-2017, 07:33 PM
#15
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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Winter’s Hill Estate, Dundee, Oregon
Tasting area, 2017 August 25:  a very high contrast scene
Camera:  Fujifilm X10, with EXR (pixel-binning) sensor and firmware that — properly set — can extend dynamic range 3 to 4 EV

[Image: XgtdruT.jpg]
Camera-produced .JPG file:  EXR techmology DR400 (expanded dynamic range) with Velvia film simulation,
tweaked in Apple Aperture.


[Image: 6mwi5dm.jpg]
.JPG File developed from RAW file using Silkypix RAW converter.

[Image: Q4Zx3o4.jpg]
.JPG file developed from RAW file using Luminar RAW converter.

Further deponent sayeth not.

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 07-31-2019, 04:20 AM
#16
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I have paint shop 2019 and have only played with JPEG
I don't know much about raw files

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 07-31-2019, 04:28 AM
#17
  • RyznRio
  • Active Member
  • Connecticut
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(06-28-2017, 05:22 PM)number six Wrote:  I'm now mostly shooting with a Leica Q and only record raw images. They take especially well to post processing in Lightroom or any other program.

I have a LUMIX 1000 and mostly shoot raw and  Signs011

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 07-31-2019, 04:42 PM
#18
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For anyone with a sony camera, capture one is free to use. Slightly different than Lightroom, I seem to get equivalent or better post-procssing.

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 08-01-2019, 03:39 AM
#19
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(07-31-2019, 04:42 PM)mike_the_kraken Wrote: For anyone with a sony camera, capture one is free to use. Slightly different than Lightroom, I seem to get equivalent or better post-procssing.
I have used Lightroom for many years.  I decided to give Capture One for Sony a try.  For me, it meets my needs for RAW processing.  Fairly simple interface.  Lots of tools.

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 08-01-2019, 04:59 AM
#20
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(07-31-2019, 04:42 PM)mike_the_kraken Wrote: For anyone with a sony camera, capture one is free to use. Slightly different than Lightroom, I seem to get equivalent or better post-procssing.

There is also a free, reduced feature set, version of CaptureOne for Fujifilm cameras.  

[Image: 13g2dyx.jpg]
Straight out of camera JPG file (Fujifilm X10).

[Image: 5sdKbRB.jpg]
RAW file processed with CaptureOne Express for Fujifilm.

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