08-23-2012, 01:17 PM
#1
  • slantman
  • Expert Shaver
  • Leesburg, Florida
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Two expressions that were popular a while back. I don't like either one.

" Hit the ground running "

" What goes around comes around "

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 08-23-2012, 01:25 PM
#2
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I think " what goes around comes around" is still popular...
And True!

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 08-23-2012, 01:37 PM
#3
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YOLO.

This one drives me nuts.

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 08-23-2012, 01:56 PM
#4
  • freddy
  • Senior Member
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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(08-23-2012, 01:37 PM)SharpSpine Wrote: YOLO.

This one drives me nuts.
I've never heard it and haven't a clue as to what it means. I have heard BOLO, though.

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 08-23-2012, 02:19 PM
#5
  • slantman
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  • Leesburg, Florida
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(08-23-2012, 01:56 PM)freddy Wrote:
(08-23-2012, 01:37 PM)SharpSpine Wrote: YOLO.

This one drives me nuts.
I've never heard it and haven't a clue as to what it means. I have heard BOLO, though.

There is a BOLO out for you Freddy and I want the reward.

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 08-23-2012, 03:20 PM
#6
  • freddy
  • Senior Member
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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Fine, but that still doesn't explain YOLO. Huh

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 08-23-2012, 03:21 PM
#7
  • Dave
  • Moderator Emeritus
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You
Only
Live
Once

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 08-23-2012, 03:24 PM
#8
  • freddy
  • Senior Member
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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Then why not just say, "You only live once."? I don't hear it that often so I can't say that it is an expression that particularly bothers me.

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 08-23-2012, 03:25 PM
#9
  • Dave
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That's something that apparently just started. I'm very lucky. I have a 15 year old son who's much hipper than me, so I just ask him what all this stuff means.

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 08-23-2012, 03:30 PM
#10
  • freddy
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  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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Yes, having a 15 year old around the house definitely helps. 24

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 08-23-2012, 03:37 PM
#11
  • biggiej42
  • Looney for Rooney
  • Stony Point, NY
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I can't stand the expression: "It is what it is".

No it's not, it's what you make it to be!

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 08-23-2012, 05:46 PM
#12
  • freddy
  • Senior Member
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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Reading these threads on words and phrases that Jerry started has been fascinating. I thought it was just I who found certain things like this irritating.

One that I never liked is "can I" when "may I" is clearly what was meant. Today, they are used interchangeably and I even find myself saying one for the other even though I know there is a difference. Sometimes these things cannot be fought. Besides, one of the things that makes English such an intriguing language is its flexibility and adaptability, though I don't always agree with the change.

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 08-23-2012, 06:04 PM
#13
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Bye, bye! (As is ending a phone call.) One "bye" is sufficient.

Really, really (..bad, etc.) One "really" is emphasis enough.

I also dislike "Have a good one!" A good one of what?

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 08-23-2012, 06:38 PM
#14
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(08-23-2012, 06:04 PM)Bowlturner Wrote: I also dislike "Have a good one!" A good one of what?

Oooh... you know... Smile

I really hate "my bad"!!! Yes, you are!

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 08-23-2012, 06:45 PM
#15
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(08-23-2012, 05:46 PM)freddy Wrote: One that I never liked is "can I" when "may I" is clearly what was meant.

When I was a kid, there was only one guy in the neighborhood who had a swimming pool, and I and the other kids would ask him if we could use it, saying, "Can we use your pool Mr. Foley?" He always would reply "Mais oui." Which of course we heard as him correcting our grammar, saying "May we." So we would then say "May we?" And he, maddeningly, would just keep saying "Mais oui" until he could see we were fed up, and he'd say, "Sure, go ahead."

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 08-23-2012, 07:19 PM
#16
  • freddy
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  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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(08-23-2012, 06:45 PM)churchilllafemme Wrote:
(08-23-2012, 05:46 PM)freddy Wrote: One that I never liked is "can I" when "may I" is clearly what was meant.

When I was a kid, there was only one guy in the neighborhood who had a swimming pool, and I and the other kids would ask him if we could use it, saying, "Can we use your pool Mr. Foley?" He always would reply "Mais oui." Which of course we heard as him correcting our grammar, saying "May we." So we would then say "May we?" And he, maddeningly, would just keep saying "Mais oui" until he could see we were fed up, and he'd say, "Sure, go ahead."

That's a great story, John, learning grammar and French all at the same time. Wink

When I taught elementary school, I always taught my students the difference between may I and can I. Invariably, a student would come up to me and ask, "Can I use the toilet?" I'd look at the child and say, "Don't you know how?" It always got a giggle and a correct response. At Open House or Parent-Teacher Conferences there would be one or two parents telling me that their children would correct them. This was always said with a smile or a laugh from the parent and, in all my years of teaching, not one parent ever complained about it.

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 08-23-2012, 08:28 PM
#17
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(08-23-2012, 02:19 PM)slantman Wrote:
(08-23-2012, 01:56 PM)freddy Wrote:
(08-23-2012, 01:37 PM)SharpSpine Wrote: YOLO.

This one drives me nuts.
I've never heard it and haven't a clue as to what it means. I have heard BOLO, though.

There is a BOLO out for you Freddy and I want the reward.

* Hee heee! Brilliant.

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 08-27-2012, 03:18 PM
#18
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The one I could not stop saying for a long time "that's that".

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