07-10-2017, 12:46 AM
#1
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
User Info
This is on its way to me. Mint, unused condition with box and papers, specifying 1950. A beautiful-looking rarity, I'm sure you will agree.

I have never seen a handle of this kind on a Culmak ('ivory look'...or whatever it is called) but I have an old Rooney that does (a boar brush).

Has anyone any experience with the #40? The knot might be a little narrow, not sure, but I think I can live with it  Smile


[Image: ZW8aI0F.jpg]

0 1,766
Reply
 07-10-2017, 03:50 AM
#2
User Info
That certainly looks mint.  Nice score.

50 6,059
Reply
 07-10-2017, 05:39 AM
#3
User Info
I saw that yesterday. Very interesting.

Congratulations!

9 1,407
Reply
 07-10-2017, 05:46 PM
#4
User Info
The original handle material, in that form, is called several names - Pyralin, French Ivory, and Dupont Ivory, just to name a few.  It was originally made to mimic elephant ivory, complete with graining.

The material was an inexpensive way to manufacture objects and decorations that imitated the appearance of ivory, amber, coral, tortoiseshell, seashell, and carnelian.  In "faux ivory" form, it was heavily used in making dresser and vanity sets (i.e., hand mirrors, perfume bottles, powder jars, hair receivers, button hooks, brushes, combs, trays, etc.).

Celluloid is actually a trade name.  The term, Celluloid, has been generically used for decades to reference a type of plastic material invented in the mid 1800s and used until around the 1940s.  It's actually cellulose dinitrate (cellulose fibers) blended with pigments, camphor, fillers, and alcohol to make a form of plastic.

8 172
Reply
 07-10-2017, 06:01 PM
#5
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
User Info
(07-10-2017, 05:46 PM)Gigster Wrote: The original handle material, in that form, is called several names - Pyralin, French Ivory, and Dupont Ivory, just to name a few.  It was originally made to mimic elephant ivory, complete with graining.

The material was an inexpensive way to manufacture objects and decorations that imitated the appearance of ivory, amber, coral, tortoiseshell, seashell, and carnelian.  In "faux ivory" form, it was heavily used in making dresser and vanity sets (i.e., hand mirrors, perfume bottles, powder jars, hair receivers, button hooks, brushes, combs, trays, etc.).

Celluloid is actually a trade name.  The term, Celluloid, has been generically used for decades to reference a type of plastic material invented in the mid 1800s and used until around the 1940s.  It's actually cellulose dinitrate (cellulose fibers) blended with pigments, camphor, fillers, and alcohol to make a form of plastic.

Interesting and informative, thank you. 

When I receive the brush, I'll check to see if it is a lathed block of solid celluloid, or a moulded form. I have never seen this material used in a Culmak before. I think it might be a bit of a rarity, therefore, and so it's important to document. This brush dates from 1950 (verified in the paperwork); I'd have thought celluloid would have been considered an old material by then. Interesting, nonetheless.

I like to use Shave Nook as that repository of information for all to access and research. Plus... it's fun Smile

0 1,766
Reply
 07-10-2017, 06:18 PM
#6
User Info
No problem.


I've restored six, Pyralin handles and all have been shells.  They were filled with some type of cheap filler, with the most being a material similar to Paster of Paris.  All were hefty in weight, but once into the restore. . . . .I would discover the filler.  The other common filler was a mix of glue and saw dust.  Both fillers were poured into the handles in a thick, liquid form.


Mass production of Celluloid stopped in the 40s, but it often took a number of years for "old stock" to dry up.  Keep in mind too, the process of manufacturing "plastic" was always evolving and improving.  It wasn't uncommon for companies to release new plastics in old styles or to produce special orders.

8 172
Reply
 08-11-2017, 04:02 PM
#7
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
User Info
The mint-condition brush did arrive a couple of weeks ago, and yes, it is a kind of celluloid shell, filled in. It doesn't detract from its beauty though. I haven't lathered up with it yet.

0 1,766
Reply
 08-11-2017, 04:25 PM
#8
User Info
That's cool!

The knot, in the pic you posted, looks to get in good condition.  I'm curious to know how the original knot works out.

8 172
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)