07-10-2017, 10:03 AM
#1
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Hey Guys!

I've been thinking about starting to use a shaving brush, I haven't used one before, been using my finger tips all these years lol. I did get one as a gift a few years ago, but I didn't really use it at the time since I was sporting a beard so wasn’t shaving much. My biggest fear is if I’m spending some money on a brush, I don’t want it to be something that is crappy or doesn’t work properly.
 
I saw some options compared on this site and am leaning towards the Parker Safety Badger Brush.
 
http://theshaveauthority.com/category/shaving-brush-reviews/
 
What do you guys think? Trying to get some input.
Thanks for the help in advance.

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 07-10-2017, 10:26 AM
#2
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What is your budget?

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 07-10-2017, 10:50 AM
#3
  • nikos.a
  • Senior Member
  • Athens, Greece
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I'd recommend you an inexpensive synthetic Plissoft- type brush. These usually go for about $10, so they deserve a try before purchasing something more expensive. You'll be pleased with it.

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 07-10-2017, 02:51 PM
#4
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For a good starter brush I really like the Stirling finest fan. I bought one for my father and friend for Christmas and they love them. The knot is very nice, no upside down hair, enough backbone and no scratch, silky soft tips, the handle is quite nice and ergonomic as well

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 07-10-2017, 03:22 PM
#5
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Bayside, NY
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Two things to consider, really. You should have some kind of idea as to what type of knot you want to get started with; badger, boar, horse, synthetic. Once you have that narrowed down, you should try to determine your budget.

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 07-10-2017, 04:39 PM
#6
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
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See my post on SMF.

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 07-10-2017, 05:15 PM
#7
  • Quando
  • Banned
  • Somewhere far-away, from Home
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I would start with an inexpensive boar-hair brush.  Omega makes several, for under $10.00.  I would dissuade you, from using synthetic brushes.  I find them weird, compared to natural hair brushes.

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 07-10-2017, 05:40 PM
#8
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Though the Parker isn't awful per-se, I wouldn't recommend it. Start with an inexpensive synthetic until you determine that you like using a shave brush and master it a bit. Then you can patiently wait for a nice Shavemac or Thäter to turn up on the B/S/T.

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 07-10-2017, 06:51 PM
#9
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A boar gets my vote, they are inexpensive even for good quality ones.  I don't think synthetics would be the best option for somebody starting out.  Price wise they are good but don't retain water and somebody starting should have consistency.

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 07-12-2017, 02:15 PM
#10
  • Journeyman
  • Active Member
  • The Present (when I'm lucky)
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Not familiar with the Parker brush, but it has pure badger hair, which may be a bit prickly in feel for you. For the same price range, give or take a dollar or two, you could get a Stirling brush with much softer tips. Some people like scritchy (prickly) tip brushes and some like soft tip brushes. Given that you haven't tried either, I'd point you to the Stirling with soft tips. Also the Stirling has gotten good buzz on this forum by people who have some good brush experience, so that's another plus in its favor.

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 07-12-2017, 03:29 PM
#11
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(07-10-2017, 05:40 PM)mike_the_kraken Wrote: Though the Parker isn't awful per-se, I wouldn't recommend it. Start with an inexpensive synthetic until you determine that you like using a shave brush and master it a bit. Then you can patiently wait for a nice Shavemac or Thäter to turn up on the B/S/T.

There are a few nice Thaters on BST right now. The 4125 is my favorite brush right now. I also have two Simpsons with best badger, a Commodore x3 and an older Chubby 2, and two Maggard synthetics (one in a custom handle). The synths are decent with cream, but I find it takes more work with them when you are using soap. That is mainly because it takes more time to load them with soap compared to a natural hair brush. They just don't seem to pick up the soap. Aside from that, they do feel very soft and they dry much faster than natural hair, especially badger. I must say the new synths are way better than the old ones, but I still prefer badger, as long as it is good quality badger, which isn't cheap.

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 07-12-2017, 04:30 PM
#12
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(07-12-2017, 03:29 PM)Puma Wrote:
(07-10-2017, 05:40 PM)mike_the_kraken Wrote: Though the Parker isn't awful per-se, I wouldn't recommend it. Start with an inexpensive synthetic until you determine that you like using a shave brush and master it a bit. Then you can patiently wait for a nice Shavemac or Thäter to turn up on the B/S/T.

There are a few nice Thaters on BST right now. The 4125 is my favorite brush right now. I also have two Simpsons with best badger, a Commodore x3 and an older Chubby 2, and two Maggard synthetics (one in a custom handle). The synths are decent with cream, but I find it takes more work with them when you are using soap. That is mainly because it takes more time to load them with soap compared to a natural hair brush. They just don't seem to pick up the soap. Aside from that, they do feel very soft and they dry much faster than natural hair. Especially badger. I must say the new synths are way better than the old ones, but I I still prefer badger, as long as it is good quality badger, which isn't cheap.

Interesting. I think most, myself included, find synths to load faster than natural hair brushes (and to use less soap overall). ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

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 07-13-2017, 02:02 AM
#13
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(07-12-2017, 04:30 PM)mike_the_kraken Wrote:
(07-12-2017, 03:29 PM)Puma Wrote:
(07-10-2017, 05:40 PM)mike_the_kraken Wrote: Though the Parker isn't awful per-se, I wouldn't recommend it. Start with an inexpensive synthetic until you determine that you like using a shave brush and master it a bit. Then you can patiently wait for a nice Shavemac or Thäter to turn up on the B/S/T.

There are a few nice Thaters on BST right now. The 4125 is my favorite brush right now. I also have two Simpsons with best badger, a Commodore x3 and an older Chubby 2, and two Maggard synthetics (one in a custom handle). The synths are decent with cream, but I find it takes more work with them when you are using soap. That is mainly because it takes more time to load them with soap compared to a natural hair brush. They just don't seem to pick up the soap. Aside from that, they do feel very soft and they dry much faster than natural hair. Especially badger. I must say the new synths are way better than the old ones, but I I still prefer badger, as long as it is good quality badger, which isn't cheap.

Interesting. I think most, myself included, find synths to load faster than natural hair brushes (and to use less soap overall). ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

I should have said in that post that my findings are contrary to those of most people. I'm not just trying to be contradictory, but I've tried to verify that synths use less soap and create lather faster by comparing both, one right after the other, and I couldn't. I seem to be using similar amounts of soap and I definitely need a little more time to load the softer, less dense synths. The difference was really not enough to be worth discussing except for it being opposite of what I expected. Once the lather is created the synths do release it all easier and faster. The badgers will hold some in the hairs so when you think you are done, a little squeeze will get enough lather out for the final pass. I still keep a synth in the regular rotation.

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 07-13-2017, 05:18 AM
#14
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I have to agree with the sentiments expressed above:  brush preferences, like cars, are so subjective that it doesn't make sense to spend a lot of money before you have an idea of what you're getting into.  Personally, I think a moderately-priced badger like one of the Asylum brushes Phil sells might be your best bet, but really:  any of the the ones suggested should get you started down the right path.

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