07-21-2017, 11:34 PM
#21
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I have some vac packed beef ribs in the freezer, so no, not yet. We almost stopped in today to see what price I could get on Chuck to grind my own meat for burgers, but our other butcher had ground chuck for a decent price so we didn't go in for that either.

We've been finding that as we age we eat less. So it's getting more difficult to cook what I did in the past and consume it all in a reasonable amount of time. Those whole packer briskets were 18#ers. I'd need to cook something like that and have lots of folks over to even consider it anymore. A decade ago I would cook something like that for the crew I worked with and it worked out fine. That brings up another thing to do with BBQ. Leftover brisket makes for some pretty decent creamed chipped beef aka SOS. The first time I used it for that the wife proclaimed it the best I'd ever made. In the past we'd buy a side of beef critter too, those days are gone. We just don't eat that much anymore to make it worth doing.

Phil, you can do all sorts of things now that you have a ceramic kamado. Make your own slab bacon, buckboard bacon, or Canadian bacon for the price of the meat (pork belly, pork butt, pork  loin) and it rivals or is better than anything you can buy. Red pastrami is super easy to do. It just requires curing the meat with cure and spices (very easy), or for beef pastrami, just buy corned beef when it's on sale (pre-cured beef), spice it up with a mess of garlic, ground coriander, and black pepper, give it some dwell time in a bag to infuse the flavors (hours or days, I prefer days), then a mess of smoke in a L&S cooker and it's finished off as you would a brisket. To get it extra tender it can be put into a pressure cooker for 1/2 an hour after the kamado cooking. Smoked salmon is easy to make too, and all it takes is a smoke generator to do cold smoking. The salmon needs to be cured first, but that's no big deal, it's a gravlox cure with salt and sugar and spices for 24 hours. In the past I went through all sorts of gyrations to cold smoke, but now I just use an A-maze-N smoke generator and it's so much easier. Heck, it'll even turn a cardboard box into a smoker. There are other smoke generators, but that's what I've used for years.

I'm trying to tell you that you've expanded your capabilities into great eating a great deal with your purchase. Let's see, just for buckboard bacon alone, I can't buy the finished product anywhere, the butt costs $.89/lb on sale.  Then I turn it into something that if I could buy, it would sell for minimum $6+ per lb. Lots of inexpensive but extremely good eating if it's done right and the techniques are easy. I haven't even discussed the intoxicating aroma that comes out of the top of the cooker. But you'll figure that out for yourself. Tip, a few onions in the cooker, off to the side of the fire so that they are in the fire hours into the cook, helps with aroma to get the neighbors curiosity fired up. It can be smelled a hundred yards away under the right conditions. It doesn't do anything for the flavor of the meat, but it will get the neighborhood "fired up". A few adult beverages and a chaise lounge and all is right with the world.

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 07-22-2017, 05:21 AM
#22
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(07-19-2017, 11:57 AM)22bulldog Wrote: You got the main ones covered it seems.  Peach, cherry and apple all go well with pork.

I'm not a fan of any of the fruit woods on beef, usually stick to some sort of oak (if I use anything).  I never use Mesquite on anything (for reasons Sully pointed out above).
I use hickory a lot with pork. I soak the wood chunks because it gives a longer smoke and they don't burn up as quick.

Clayton

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using Tapatalk

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 07-22-2017, 02:48 PM
#23
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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(07-21-2017, 11:34 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: I have some vac packed beef ribs in the freezer, so no, not yet. We almost stopped in today to see what price I could get on Chuck to grind my own meat for burgers, but our other butcher had ground chuck for a decent price so we didn't go in for that either.

We've been finding that as we age we eat less. So it's getting more difficult to cook what I did in the past and consume it all in a reasonable amount of time. Those whole packer briskets were 18#ers. I'd need to cook something like that and have lots of folks over to even consider it anymore. A decade ago I would cook something like that for the crew I worked with and it worked out fine. That brings up another thing to do with BBQ. Leftover brisket makes for some pretty decent creamed chipped beef aka SOS. The first time I used it for that the wife proclaimed it the best I'd ever made. In the past we'd buy a side of beef critter too, those days are gone. We just don't eat that much anymore to make it worth doing.

Phil, you can do all sorts of things now that you have a ceramic kamado. Make your own slab bacon, buckboard bacon, or Canadian bacon for the price of the meat (pork belly, pork butt, pork  loin) and it rivals or is better than anything you can buy. Red pastrami is super easy to do. It just requires curing the meat with cure and spices (very easy), or for beef pastrami, just buy corned beef when it's on sale (pre-cured beef), spice it up with a mess of garlic, ground coriander, and black pepper, give it some dwell time in a bag to infuse the flavors (hours or days, I prefer days), then a mess of smoke in a L&S cooker and it's finished off as you would a brisket. To get it extra tender it can be put into a pressure cooker for 1/2 an hour after the kamado cooking. Smoked salmon is easy to make too, and all it takes is a smoke generator to do cold smoking. The salmon needs to be cured first, but that's no big deal, it's a gravlox cure with salt and sugar and spices for 24 hours. In the past I went through all sorts of gyrations to cold smoke, but now I just use an A-maze-N smoke generator and it's so much easier. Heck, it'll even turn a cardboard box into a smoker. There are other smoke generators, but that's what I've used for years.

I'm trying to tell you that you've expanded your capabilities into great eating a great deal with your purchase. Let's see, just for buckboard bacon alone, I can't buy the finished product anywhere, the butt costs $.89/lb on sale.  Then I turn it into something that if I could buy, it would sell for minimum $6+ per lb. Lots of inexpensive but extremely good eating if it's done right and the techniques are easy. I haven't even discussed the intoxicating aroma that comes out of the top of the cooker. But you'll figure that out for yourself. Tip, a few onions in the cooker, off to the side of the fire so that they are in the fire hours into the cook, helps with aroma to get the neighbors curiosity fired up. It can be smelled a hundred yards away under the right conditions. It doesn't do anything for the flavor of the meat, but it will get the neighborhood "fired up". A few adult beverages and a chaise lounge and all is right with the world.

Thank you Brian. I am looking forward to the ribs and appreciate all of your pointers.

I am amazed at everything you can make on the Kamado style grills. I am not sure what I am making for dinner next week but I do know that I will make some cornbread on the grill. Deep dish pizza is also on the to-do list in the near future.

I am going to pick up some onions in order to make the whole neighborhood hungry.  Thank you very much for the tip.

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 07-22-2017, 02:52 PM
#24
  • bullgoose
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  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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(07-20-2017, 12:21 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Cherry smoked low and slow short ribs are my fav' meal on the planet. But they need to be meaty. I'd buy a 3 shortrib slab that weighed near 7#; very meaty. I've seen those that had just enough meat to barely interest a dog as a chewy toy. You don't want those. Keep the 3 rib slab together for my method. Lesser ribs (<7# for a slab) will change my method below. Cut them apart after cooking.

I very generously marinate mine in a mix of worchestershire sauce, hot paprika, blk pepper, and gran' garlic, it should be the consistency of a loose pancake batter. They can marinate for a day or 2 weeks, I have a refrigerator that hovers near 32°F for BBQ, if you don't have that then marinate for a shorter time than 2 weeks. Don't rinse them off, just pull them out of the bag and trash the marinade. Then 250° for 3 hours or so, indirect heat, lotsa cherry wood, maybe 3-5 chunks as big as a fist, bone side down on the grates. I like the fat in my shortribs to be liquified and the meat rare, you're looking for an internal of 130-135°ish. Pick them up like corn on the cob and get all caveman on them. Knife and fork? Fuggedaboudit! Have plenty of napkins. It's just heaven on a plate. I'm salivating at the thought and have been as I wrote this.
Should I trim any of the fat prior to the marinade?

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 07-22-2017, 03:45 PM
#25
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I don't. But sure, you can. I employ time to get the marinade to soak in so the fat is meaningless to that. Fat is flavor, but too much is a negative. You'll need to evaluate what you have and what you can tolerate. I have a friend who eats everything on the beef rib, but he doesn't get much meat or fat at home so he's starved for it.

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 07-22-2017, 06:21 PM
#26
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Icon_popcorn   can't wait to see the ribs!

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 07-22-2017, 07:51 PM
#27
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(07-20-2017, 12:21 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: I very generously marinate mine in a mix of worchestershire sauce, hot paprika, blk pepper, and gran' garlic,

<Heresy Alert>.  
We are grillers, not BBQers, but this season we have discovered a line of pre-packaged marinades that we really like for our grilling.  What struck me, standing in the aisle of an Albertsons store, reading labels, was that Rib Rack Marinade Sauce, which comes in several varieties for specific meats, not only lists the ingredients on the label — all of the supermarket sauces and marinades do that — but in a separate part of the label are pictures of all (there are not many ingredients in any given sauce) of the ingredients.  The ingredients comprise only things that one can show pictures of (imagine depicting monosodium glutamate, which Rib Rack marinades do not have).  

[Image: 73kMOdh.jpg]
6 o’clock last evening:  the sunshine gods and the smoke gods combined to bestow a blessing upon our Weber chimney

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 07-23-2017, 01:27 PM
#28
  • bullgoose
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  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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My fruitwood arrived on Thursday. I am using pecan wood for today's smoke. The ribs were marinated over night and we are ready for takeoff.

[Image: HWQIl4N.jpg][Image: IqoIKFA.jpg]

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 07-23-2017, 01:40 PM
#29
  • bullgoose
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I'm about 2 hours in right now. There is still a ways to go.

[Image: vbZoMXS.jpg][Image: dX88yyK.jpg]

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 07-23-2017, 02:26 PM
#30
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They're looking good Phil.  What does your temperature gauge read?

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 07-23-2017, 02:31 PM
#31
  • bullgoose
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(07-23-2017, 02:26 PM)TheLegalRazor Wrote: They're looking good Phil.  What does your temperature gauge read?

The grate temperature is at 252 and the internal temp is at 190 right now

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 07-23-2017, 03:28 PM
#32
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Those are looking good.  Enjoy.

When you get a chance, you might want to try pork belly burnt ends.  They aren't super healthy, but they are beyond tasty.

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 07-23-2017, 04:00 PM
#33
  • bullgoose
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(07-23-2017, 03:28 PM)PanChango Wrote: Those are looking good.  Enjoy.

When you get a chance, you might want to try pork belly burnt ends.  They aren't super healthy, but they are beyond tasty.

I'll have to look up how to cook that. I am definitely up for trying it.  Thanks for the tip.

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 07-24-2017, 12:14 PM
#34
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Something  I do, and it is definitely NOT 5 star dining is... well, allow me to digress.

For years I thought Spam was ground up pig "touch hole" as a now deceased neighbor would say, and those were the good parts of what was in the can. I wouldn't touch it. Then a few years ago I found out that it was ground up boston butt (aka the "picnic"). Yes, the same part of the pig that's used for pulled pork. I also saw that Spam had a hickory smoked flavor, but we couldn't buy that locally. So putting that together and unleashing my childlike inquisitive brain I asked myself why can't spam be smoked? After testing, that started a local smoked spam day where I let the neighbors know when I'm smoking spam and they bring their cans over for me to smoke. I fill the Primo. It turns something mundane into not 5 star dining, but you won't believe how good it is. I never eat it cold, but vac' pack it and freeze, then take one out and slice and fry once in awhile. It tastes very much like L&S pulled pork. The spam blocks can be done L&S at absolute minimum cooker temp', or cold smoked. Cold smoking doesn't require temp' control. But if it's a warm climate (I'm thinking CA) that cold smoke technique might need to be put on the shelf since spam doesn't have cure in it to keep microbes at bay.

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 07-24-2017, 05:15 PM
#35
  • bullgoose
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For those wondering -Brian's recipe turned out great! I'll definitely be making them again.

[Image: 7dV9XPW.jpg]

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 07-24-2017, 05:18 PM
#36
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Those look awesome Phil!  Well done!

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 07-24-2017, 05:32 PM
#37
  • bullgoose
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(07-24-2017, 05:18 PM)TheLegalRazor Wrote: Those look awesome Phil!  Well done!
Thank you Ricardo.

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 07-24-2017, 05:32 PM
#38
  • Sully
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Not beef ribs but I did cook some pork ribs today.  We had torrential rains here in central Texas and that made things interesting.  

[Image: TMHN6Lw.jpg]

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 07-24-2017, 05:39 PM
#39
  • bullgoose
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Nice bark Shawn! They look great

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 07-24-2017, 05:47 PM
#40
  • Sully
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Thanks Phil.  I tried to resize the picture so it was more reasonably sized, but I was not successful.   Blush

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