08-24-2017, 04:43 PM
#1
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Or, is it all in our heads?  

Or, to put it another way:  how can mineral content alter the creation of lather?  Would the amount of water need to be increased?

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 08-24-2017, 05:41 PM
#2
  • SCOV
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I really liked High School Chemistry!!  Minerals like calcium and magnesium in hard water create an undesirable chemical reaction in soap, shampoo, and shaving soap/cream.  I changed my major to Accounting in college - do not ask for the exact chemical equation.  The chemical reaction is the cause of soap scum, dry skin, low soap lather, etc. 

Unless you have natural spring water from natural ecosystems, you have hard water.  

Go to the local natural/healthy food store and buy a few bottles of quality spring water (Mountain Valley, Icelandic, 1907, etc.).  If really concerned about your health,  Mountain Valley was the water of choice for race horses (Secretariat), rock stars (Elvis, John Lennon), Republicans (Eisenhower), Democrats (Clinton), etc.

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 08-25-2017, 11:23 AM
#3
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I believe hard water makes it somewhat difficult to create a good lather in any type of soap.  Last year my neighbor installed a water softener in his house and he said he can't believe the difference.  Every soap works so much better.  I have been using distilled water to soak my brush in and make a lather for years.  You can't believe the difference.  I have absolutely no problems creating great lather especially with hard trippled milled soaps.  A gallon is generally under a dollar.  Try it.

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 08-25-2017, 02:27 PM
#4
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I've still got some distilled water from when I had my deviated septum surgery, going to try this.

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 08-25-2017, 04:37 PM
#5
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I have very hard water where I live and when I vacation to see my mother ,they have very soft water. Lathering the soap is generally easier but in the end the performance is nearly if not exactly the same for me. My opinion is if you have a lot of soap and hydrate that soap nicely to a stable lather , it's going to be slick.

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 08-25-2017, 05:30 PM
#6
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(08-24-2017, 05:41 PM)SCOV Wrote: I really liked High School Chemistry!!  Minerals like calcium and magnesium in hard water create an undesirable chemical reaction in soap, shampoo, and shaving soap/cream.  I changed my major to Accounting in college - do not ask for the exact chemical equation.  The chemical reaction is the cause of soap scum, dry skin, low soap lather, etc. 

Unless you have natural spring water from natural ecosystems, you have hard water.  

Go to the local natural/healthy food store and buy a few bottles of quality spring water (Mountain Valley, Icelandic, 1907, etc.).  If really concerned about your health,  Mountain Valley was the water of choice for race horses (Secretariat), rock stars (Elvis, John Lennon), Republicans (Eisenhower), Democrats (Clinton), etc.

Okay, this makes sense.  Thank you, for sharing your wisdom.  

I want to instal a water softener, now.

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 08-25-2017, 06:16 PM
#7
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If you use the water softener system that uses the salt pellets, you should notice considerably slicker soap, even when just washing you hands with a bar soap.

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 08-25-2017, 06:16 PM
#8
  • Nero
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If you use the water softener system that uses the salt pellets, you should notice considerably slicker soap, even when just washing you hands with a bar soap.

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 08-25-2017, 06:22 PM
#9
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(08-25-2017, 04:37 PM)ultra~nova Wrote: I have very hard water where I live and when I vacation to see my mother ,they have very soft water. Lathering the soap is generally easier but in the end the performance is nearly if not exactly the same for me. My opinion is if you have a lot of soap and hydrate that soap nicely to a stable lather , it's going to be slick.

I am not saying that distilled water will make a soap slicker.  Hard water can make achieving a great lather difficult where distilled water or other soft water does make creating a great lather easier to produce.  If you can get a good lather whether it is face or bowl lathering it should be slick whether you have hard or soft water

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 08-25-2017, 07:12 PM
#10
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Another benefit of soft water: soap scum reduction.

Edit: Ah, I see soap scum had been mentioned already!

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 08-25-2017, 08:18 PM
#11
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Since I primarily use badger brushes, to keep them in the best state, I only use distilled or filtered water. It is also easier on my face as the hard tap water on a freshly shaved face is a bit tacky feeling and slightly stingy.

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 08-25-2017, 09:13 PM
#12
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As has been mentioned, it's called hard water because it's harder to lather with it. Soft water is just referred to as "water." The hard minerals inhibit the formation of bubbles as they bind with the soap salts. Most commercial soaps & creams have a chelator which will bind to the minerals and reduce most of the effects of hard water, so you may not even notice it.

Does it reduce slickness? Maybe. But I'm not sure on that one.

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 08-26-2017, 06:04 AM
#13
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Yes.  It makes a difference that is easily noticeable.  

I am fortunate enough to live in a place where the water that comes out of the tap is very soft.  All soaps lather great and post-bath and post-shave skin feels wonderful.  I am spoiled.  

If I take my soaps on vacation, I immediately notice a huge difference, not just for shaving but for showering, too.  My brother visited me from NYC.  We gave him a nice bath bar and a scrunchie.  He had never used one before.  My wife told him to try it.  After one shower he said that we had "changed his life."  

However, when he got back to NYC, the magic was gone.  



I noticed a difference last year when my wife and I spent a week in Richmond, VA, which is only a two-hour drive from my home.  I get way better shaving lather here, and in less time.  



So, yes.  The difference it makes is real, and it is not insignificant.

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 08-26-2017, 06:47 PM
#14
  • naiyor
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Yes. There us an absolute difference. The tap water here is very soft. The farm well-water at the grandparents is very hard. I have used bottled water occasionally to get an easy lather, but that was just for convenience, hard water is not a deal breaker.

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 08-26-2017, 07:38 PM
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My dad used to say we had self sealing pipes. Every couple of months he'd take the aerators off all of the sinks and the shower head off to spill the pebbles out. I still do that at my house a few miles away from where I grew up.

I'd like to get a water softener. Not just for shaving obviously. 

When we replaced our hot water heater the new one was a bit taller. The plumber ended up replacing a fairly long section of the cold water line leading to it after trimming a two or three inch section of copper pipe initially. Holding it up and looking through it, I wouldn't have believed it if I hadn't seen it. That pipe had probably been in place longer than I'd been alive and seen a few hot water heaters. I'm guessing 40 years. It was nearly too narrow with deposits to see through inside. I wish I'd have held onto it or tried to take a picture.

The scale and deposits and soap scum is a never ending annoyance. I don't exactly want to lug bags of salt into the basement either. We've been discussing moving lately, but if we stay in this house a few more years we'll get a softener. I think our old dishwasher is on its last leg and we just bought a new clothes washer recently. I suspect that we're wrecking our new appliances prematurely by not having a softener.

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 08-26-2017, 07:41 PM
#16
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Just for illustration. I found these pictures showing what I was talking about. I'm not exactly worried about my brushes per se, but I think I'll be stepping my game up with rinsing them and cleaning them occasionally.

[Image: uzGiwCI.jpg][Image: VE19Fba.jpg]

https://www.google.com/search?q=hard+wat...24&bih=631

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