10-01-2017, 01:08 PM
#1
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These images are of a 2012 M&F L7 (the first brush I bought from Lee). They were composed using EDoF (Extended Depth of Field) software, which layers multiple shots taken at stacked focuses. I forgot to make a note of the magnification, but I think it was close to 40x.

[Image: A086---20171001_131833_zpsim1cbo7r.jpg]

[Image: A085---20171001_131710_zpsstqleube.jpg]

[Image: A084---20171001_131326_zpsshpyhqn1.jpg]

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 10-01-2017, 01:29 PM
#2
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Thanks for sharing Ken.  I have this same L7 (blonde badger) headed my way right now.  So this is very interesting to see.

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 10-01-2017, 01:38 PM
#3
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(10-01-2017, 01:29 PM)wreck | fish Wrote: Thanks for sharing Ken.  I have this same L7 (blonde badger) headed my way right now.  So this is very interesting to see.

Mine is a great brush. I still love it. Wouldn't change anything about it, which goes to a point I made in reply to your question in the knot-setting thread.

Hooked tips have become legendary (or something like it). They're often associated with gel-tips, and in fact they sometimes appear to go hand-in-hand; however, this particular brush hasn't yet exhibited what I'd call gel-tips. 

I measure its socket at about 24 mm. It's just slightly on the smallish side to suit my preferences, but it performs exceptionally well and the feel is great. Many tips have broken though (it seems a bit brittle/fragile), and I don't expect long years of service. That doesn't bother me. I'd buy it again.

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 10-01-2017, 02:28 PM
#4
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Ken, some of those hairs have split in a way similar to boar bristles.

The only explanation for hooked/gel tips I've read that makes sense to me is that they are the product of chemical tratment of the badger hair.  In a sense the tips are chemically damaged, which could explain why they may have a shorter life span.

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 10-01-2017, 02:30 PM
#5
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(10-01-2017, 02:28 PM)TheLegalRazor Wrote: Ken, some of those hairs have split in a way similar to boar bristles.

The only explanation for hooked/gel tips which I've read that makes sense to me is that they are the product of chemical tratment of the badger hair.  In a sense the tips are chemically damaged, which could explain why they may have a shorter life span.

No doubt about it, which isn't criticism. Just is what it is.

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 10-01-2017, 02:30 PM
#6
  • German
  • Simpson 2 Band Aficionado
  • USA
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(10-01-2017, 02:28 PM)TheLegalRazor Wrote: Ken, some of those hairs have split in a way similar to boar bristles.

The only explanation for hooked/gel tips I've read that makes sense to me is that they are the product of chemical tratment of the badger hair.  In a sense the tips are chemically damaged, which could explain why they may have a shorter life span.

Signs011

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 10-01-2017, 04:35 PM
#7
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I have seen some gents have no desire to own these type of brushes , sayings they are defective of sort. I have had good experiences owning these sort of knots in the past from the original Rooney heritage batch as well as the TGN finest from around the same time period. The only other brushes that have showed this consistently in my experience were Lee’s knots from time to time had hooked tips. Personally I feel like what makes a great two band knot is very fine (thin diameter) tips with great sorting (no blunt flat tipped dark hairs) with the right amount of resilience. I don’t like springy and I don’t like a knot that just spreads to the glue upon application. Hooked tips are great but I feel like what really made all those famous knots special was a combination of the other factors as well.

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 10-02-2017, 04:40 PM
#8
  • Manning
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  • Shenandoah Valley, Virginia
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The Vintage Blades brushes from several years ago also had these hooked tips and some Thaters from 4-5 years ago as well.

I can appreciate their gel like appeal, but theyre not for me and I sold the ones I had with these characteristics and wouldnt purchase another. They feel synthetic in a way to me and are just too soft for my tastes.

Those pictures are excellent close ups either way.

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 10-02-2017, 05:26 PM
#9
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I forgot about those VB brushes , nice knots in them from what I remember.

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 10-02-2017, 06:08 PM
#10
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Those pictures are cool Ken. 

This was the goopiest gel tipped brush I had. No longer mine. It was a 2012ish TGN Finest in a Rudy Vey handle.


[Image: GTHmNla.jpg][Image: UFo3dtj.jpg][Image: KjNg7w6.jpg]

This is only clear water. No soap. Just goopy gel tips when wet. Strange. Works like something else. I like it. 

That brush dries with very stiff peaks that are crispy and hard. When wet it's a slimy kind of sponge feeling.

Here's my Simfix two band silvertip. Slightly less dramatic gel tips.
[Image: OEbtEPZ.jpg][Image: bvp0JMo.jpg]

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 10-02-2017, 06:29 PM
#11
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The top one of my pictures looks like ramen noodles.

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 10-02-2017, 06:51 PM
#12
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(10-02-2017, 04:40 PM)Manning Wrote: The Vintage Blades brushes from several years ago also had these hooked tips and some Thaters from 4-5 years ago as well.

I had a complete set of the 2-Band XL series, the 1, 2 and 3 and while they were some of the loveliest soft tips, they all lacked adequate backbone, for me.

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