10-11-2017, 05:31 PM
#1
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Anyone here make your own pasta?

I have been working up a great house recipe.  3 eggs, 2 cups flour, basil, oregano, pepper, and garlic.  The trick is the consistency and balancing it out with a bit of water if needed.  Tossed with olive oil, balsamic vinegar, and vegetables makes a wonderful dinner.

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 10-11-2017, 05:49 PM
#2
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I used to make my own pasta, but it is time consuming work.  However, there is an Italian market in Miami which makes a variety of its own fresh pasta.  I really can't make it any better than they do, so I buy it there and save the time and effort.

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 10-11-2017, 06:55 PM
#3
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I haven't in quite some time but I like homemade.

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 10-11-2017, 06:56 PM
#4
  • Agravic
  • Super Moderator
  • Pennsylvania, USA
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 10-12-2017, 06:18 AM
#5
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(10-11-2017, 05:49 PM)TheLegalRazor Wrote: I used to make my own pasta, but it is time consuming work.  However, there is an Italian market in Miami which makes a variety of its own fresh pasta.  I really can't make it any better than they do, so I buy it there and save the time and effort.

Yeah it really can be.  My mother in law bought me the triple pasta roller set for kitchen aid makers.  it REALLY cuts down the time.

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 10-12-2017, 07:53 AM
#6
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Yes, if I had to make it by hand I wouldn't. Different machine but same idea, the machine makes it.

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 10-12-2017, 02:34 PM
#7
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(10-11-2017, 05:31 PM)asiliski Wrote: Anyone here make your own pasta?

I have been working up a great house recipe.  3 eggs, 2 cups flour, basil, oregano, pepper, and garlic.  The trick is the consistency and balancing it out with a bit of water if needed.  Tossed with olive oil, balsamic vinegar, and vegetables makes a wonderful dinner.

Consider this fairly well-researched article (link), which rings true in my personal experience.  Admittedly, we never purchase bargain brand supermarket dry pasta:  if the packaging does not say three specific things, we do not bring the pasta home:  
  •  Made in Italy (Italian government regulations of the ingredients of pasta (no egg allowed, BTW) are similar to German government regulations of the ingredients in beer);
  •  Extruded through bronze dies;
  • Slow-dried (as opposed to furnace dried).
We also cook our pasta in a pressure cooker, but not with pressure.  When the water with added salt has reached a boil in the open pot, and we have put the pasta into the water and brought the water back up to a boil, we turn off the heat source completely, and seal the pot using the pressure cooker lid, allowing the pasta to cook in the hot water for the allotted time without any additional external heat.  Using that method, the water that is poured off the pasta at the end of the cooking time is crystal clear, never cloudy or milky.  In the absence of a pressure cooker, placing a clean thin white cotton towel across the entire top of the open pot and then fitting a tight lid onto the pot, making the towel to function as a gasket, will perform the same function.

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 10-19-2017, 12:37 PM
#8
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A short google search shows that egg pasta is allowed.  I am confused...  

http://www.liquisearch.com/pasta/regulations/italy

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 10-19-2017, 01:10 PM
#9
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(10-19-2017, 12:37 PM)asiliski Wrote: A short google search shows that egg pasta is allowed.  I am confused...  

http://www.liquisearch.com/pasta/regulations/italy

My reference was incomplete; I apologize for the confusion.  I was referring to pasta secca, that is, dry pasta, which was the main thrust of my specific post, not to pasta fresca, fresh pasta, which was the focus of the original post in this thread.  Pasta secca is made from hard wheat, which is rich in gluten and holds together by itself when immersed in hot water; pasta fresca is made from soft wheat, which needs a binder (frequently eggs, which, as we all know, congeal in hot water) to keep the fresh pasta from disintegrating when immersed in hot water.  Again, I apologize for not pointing out the distinction in my reference.

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