01-31-2018, 08:43 PM
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I'd really rather you didn't think of me as '"sweet". Smile

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 02-01-2018, 07:54 AM
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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(01-31-2018, 08:43 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: I'd really rather you didn't think of me as '"sweet". Smile

Sorry. I rescind my comment and will edit appropriately.

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 02-01-2018, 10:08 AM
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No need to do that. Smile

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 02-01-2018, 12:19 PM
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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(02-01-2018, 10:08 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: No need to do that. Smile

Brian, I never want to offend. Especially someone who offers encouragement such as you have.
Smile

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 02-01-2018, 02:32 PM
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It's no big deal, and I didn't write that so much for you even though I used that pronoun.  I just like most people and wish them the best that I possibly can wish for them.

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 02-01-2018, 04:01 PM
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Charlie,
I'd like to thank you for starting and maintaining this thread. I don't think I need a crystal ball to see one or more new knees in my future. The information about your experience is invaluable.
Dave

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 02-01-2018, 09:48 PM
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(01-31-2018, 06:22 PM)chazt Wrote:
(01-31-2018, 03:08 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Yeah, but you can see improvement. You know that it's working. That's great!

I'm in your cheering section.

Thanks, Brian. That’s very kind of you to say.

The PT (Tom) told me today while applying the TENS pads and ice, “Chuck (he calls me Chuck), you’re doing great!” He’s really proud of what I’ve accomplished so far.


My father recently underwent a small surgery and has been upset about it for last one week. I quoted your example to motivate him to hold on to his horses.

You are a fighter Charlie and a winner!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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 02-02-2018, 07:16 AM
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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(02-01-2018, 04:01 PM)barbe-rouge Wrote: Charlie,
I'd like to thank you for starting and maintaining this thread. I don't think I need a crystal ball to see one or more new knees in my future. The information about your experience is invaluable.
Dave

Dave, for the last ten years I knew all along there would be at least one TKR in store for me. It wasn’t until about three or four years ago that the left knee began to deteriorate rapidly. The surgeon who did arthroscopies 2 and 3 kept trying to discourage me from total joint replacement. He told me every few months, “once I cut into your knee we’re starting the clock on your next surgery.” It was his opinion that the parts would only last about 12 years. Translation, “let’s wait until you’re older so you’ll be dead before you need another surgery.” This was 2013-14. However my osteoarthritis wasn’t on the doc’s timetable.

I’m glad to have found my new surgeon. He understood my situation and gave me realistic, honest advice and opinion. He said (paraphrasing here), “look, the reason most surgeons won’t do both knees at the same time is because they get paid less from the insurance companies. They tell you you need one good, stable leg to help you through recovery. That’s nonsense. If you have decent upper body strength there’s no reason not to do both knees at the same time. When you’re rehabbing one knee, the other is coming along for the ride anyway. You may as well do both since you’ll be back here soon enough anyway. I do plenty of surgeries and make plenty of money. If you’re up for it I’ll do both knees at the same time.” I’m glad I heeded this man’s words. It’s done and I’m getting my life back. It’s almost 8 weeks since the surgeries and I’m disease free!

Please let me know if I can help you in any way. Ask any questions. I’m happy to share my experiences.

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 02-02-2018, 07:20 AM
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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(02-01-2018, 09:48 PM)Jags009 Wrote:
(01-31-2018, 06:22 PM)chazt Wrote:
(01-31-2018, 03:08 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Yeah, but you can see improvement. You know that it's working. That's great!

I'm in your cheering section.

Thanks, Brian. That’s very kind of you to say.

The PT (Tom) told me today while applying the TENS pads and ice, “Chuck (he calls me Chuck), you’re doing great!” He’s really proud of what I’ve accomplished so far.


My father recently underwent a small surgery and has been upset about it for last one week. I quoted your example to motivate him to hold on to his horses.

You are a fighter Charlie and a winner!

Jagdeep, it’s good hearing from you. Thank you for the kind words. Please extend my good wishes and thoughts to your father. I hope he recovers quickly and easily. Keeping a strong, positive attitude will help him carry on. Give him all the love and encouragement he needs. He will persevere.

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 02-02-2018, 08:12 AM
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(02-02-2018, 07:16 AM)chazt Wrote:
(02-01-2018, 04:01 PM)barbe-rouge Wrote: Charlie,
I'd like to thank you for starting and maintaining this thread. I don't think I need a crystal ball to see one or more new knees in my future. The information about your experience is invaluable.
Dave

Dave, for the last ten years I knew all along there would be at least one TKR in store for me. It wasn’t until about three or four years ago that the left knee began to deteriorate rapidly. The surgeon who did arthroscopies 2 and 3 kept trying to discourage me from total joint replacement. He told me every few months, “once I cut into your knee we’re starting the clock on your next surgery.” It was his opinion that the parts would only last about 12 years. Translation, “let’s wait until you’re older so you’ll be dead before you need another surgery.” This was 2013-14. However my osteoarthritis wasn’t on the doc’s timetable.

I’m glad to have found my new surgeon. He understood my situation and gave me realistic, honest advice and opinion. He said (paraphrasing here), “look, the reason most surgeons won’t do both knees at the same time is because they get paid less from the insurance companies. They tell you you need one good, stable leg to help you through recovery. That’s nonsense. If you have decent upper body strength there’s no reason not to do both knees at the same time. When you’re rehabbing one knee, the other is coming along for the ride anyway. You may as well do both since you’ll be back here soon enough anyway. I do plenty of surgeries and make plenty of money. If you’re up for it I’ll do both knees at the same time.” I’m glad I heeded this man’s words. It’s done and I’m getting my life back. It’s almost 8 weeks since the surgeries and I’m disease free!

Please let me know if I can help you in any way. Ask any questions. I’m happy to share my experiences.
Charlie,
Thanks for the offer of advice. At the moment I'm more screwing up my courage than anything else. I expect I'll need to get off the dime pretty soon but I'm not there yet.  Frankly, I'm not sure I know enough to ask an intelligent question right now. I think I'll just lurk for a bit. If something comes to mind I'll chime in.

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 02-02-2018, 09:40 AM
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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(02-02-2018, 08:12 AM)barbe-rouge Wrote:
(02-02-2018, 07:16 AM)chazt Wrote:
(02-01-2018, 04:01 PM)barbe-rouge Wrote: Charlie,
I'd like to thank you for starting and maintaining this thread. I don't think I need a crystal ball to see one or more new knees in my future. The information about your experience is invaluable.
Dave

Dave, for the last ten years I knew all along there would be at least one TKR in store for me. It wasn’t until about three or four years ago that the left knee began to deteriorate rapidly. The surgeon who did arthroscopies 2 and 3 kept trying to discourage me from total joint replacement. He told me every few months, “once I cut into your knee we’re starting the clock on your next surgery.” It was his opinion that the parts would only last about 12 years. Translation, “let’s wait until you’re older so you’ll be dead before you need another surgery.” This was 2013-14. However my osteoarthritis wasn’t on the doc’s timetable.

I’m glad to have found my new surgeon. He understood my situation and gave me realistic, honest advice and opinion. He said (paraphrasing here), “look, the reason most surgeons won’t do both knees at the same time is because they get paid less from the insurance companies. They tell you you need one good, stable leg to help you through recovery. That’s nonsense. If you have decent upper body strength there’s no reason not to do both knees at the same time. When you’re rehabbing one knee, the other is coming along for the ride anyway. You may as well do both since you’ll be back here soon enough anyway. I do plenty of surgeries and make plenty of money. If you’re up for it I’ll do both knees at the same time.” I’m glad I heeded this man’s words. It’s done and I’m getting my life back. It’s almost 8 weeks since the surgeries and I’m disease free!

Please let me know if I can help you in any way. Ask any questions. I’m happy to share my experiences.
Charlie,
Thanks for the offer of advice. At the moment I'm more screwing up my courage than anything else. I expect I'll need to get off the dime pretty soon but I'm not there yet.  Frankly, I'm not sure I know enough to ask an intelligent question right now. I think I'll just lurk for a bit. If something comes to mind I'll chime in.

I understand what you mean about courage. For a really long time, a Really Long Time, I felt I wasn’t ready. I tried everything to avoid the surgeries (see post 1). In my mind TKR was fine for “other people” but not for me. Me? Artificial parts? Major surgery and months of PT? Nope. No way. Not happening. When I was unable to function i.e., walking and stairs, I knew it was time. And again, now I’m disease free!

You’ll know when you’re ready.

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 02-02-2018, 04:25 PM
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
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(02-02-2018, 09:40 AM)chazt Wrote: For a really long time, a Really Long Time, I felt I wasn’t ready. I tried everything to avoid the surgeries (see post 1). In my mind TKR was fine for “other people” but not for me. Me? Artificial parts? Major surgery and months of PT? Nope. No way. Not happening. When I was unable to function i.e., walking and stairs, I knew it was time. And again, now I’m disease free!

You’ll know when you’re ready.

+1

Both of my knees declined, gradually but inexorably, over a period measurable in decades, and I was voluntarily cutting back on activities that I really enjoy (e.g., backpacking).   Still and all, as of July 2016, had you asked me whether I would get a TKA (my surgeon calls it a Total Knee Arthroplasty rather than ’Replacement), my answer would have been, “Not now; not ever.”  Then, a month later, after our monthly August visit with friends who own a home at the Sunriver complex in Central Oregon — during which I had declined to join in the daily walks and even had fallen butt-first into the water when I was attempting to step off a dock into a rubber raft — the morning after our return home, I started to stand up from the breakfast table . . . and I couldn’t, I just couldn’t:  I had to pull over another chair at the table, and lift myself up with arm strength.  I called my orthopedic surgeon’s clinic the same day and scheduled my second hydrocortisone shot (the first had been nine years earlier) in the right knee, which was in much worse shape than the left knee.  The hydrocortisone did work a miracle, but this time, instead of the nine years that the first shot had been effective, the effects of the second shot lasted between two and three weeks.

Yeah.  I knew it was time.

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 02-05-2018, 11:48 AM
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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8 weeks today!! I’m so pleased with my progress. I may even look into going back to work a few weeks earlier than planned. We’ll see...

Here’s today’s update to the saga.

A week or two prior to surgeries I called the H specifically to verify that all the doctors who’d be assigned to my case accepted my insurance. The reply was an emphatic “yes” all their doctors participated in my insurance network.

This past Friday a letter appeared in my mailbox from a doctor who wanted to submit a claim on my behalf for a “surprise out of network billing.” All I need do was sign the form and mail it back. They’d take care of billing the insurance company.

I never saw this doctor in the hospital, nor did my wife who was there almost around the clock.

This morning I called the doctor’s billing office. The clerk told me that the doctor (an internist) wasn’t “on staff” at the hospital, but was “employed” by the hospital. I replied that I had no idea who this person was. I was there for surgery, not internal medicine. The clerk informed me that perhaps the doctor may not have seen me personally but looked at my chart.

Wait, what?

Following this conversation I called the insurance company. They told me they sent this doctor a preliminary payment. Further, the insurance company stated that if I sign the doctor’s form and have them submit an out of network claim on my behalf, they, the insurance company would make one more final payment to the doctor to settle the claim with a take-it-or-leave-it caveat. So what if I do nothing, I asked? Then the doctor could bill me for the balance of his/her claim. I was within my rights to ask how much was paid, and how much the doctor submitted in claim. You ready for this? Preliminary payment of $26. Yes, $26. The claim? $1500. Yes, $1500. TO LOOK AT MY CHART!?!?!?!?!

Just for fun I checked with the hospital’s billing office. My account has already been settled. They got their payment and my co-pay. We’re square. But man oh man, $1500 to look at my chart?

Thievery.

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 02-05-2018, 11:58 AM
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Charlie, I'm glad your recovery continues to go well.  The harder you push yourself with the exercises every day, the better your recovery.  I know you know that.  Biggrin

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 02-05-2018, 03:01 PM
  • chazt
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Ricardo, I push every day, just a little bit more than the day before. Thanks for the encouragement Wink

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 02-10-2018, 04:41 AM
  • Mouser
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It' amazing how far we'e come. At the time of my first spinal surgery they had no idea what they were dealing with, after numerous violent episodes, spinal taps, they flew my father and I from Taiwan to Japan in an otherwise empty C-133 I think it was. They flew in from stateside the Navy doc who had operated on Kennedy and the Air Force one who took care of Johnson.  A quick last rites and they went in. 8 hours later they found it ,took it out and two weeks later when I could hold my head up they sent me to Lackland AFB stateside, Texas for some nasty radiation.  Later in life when they had to fuse my spine and put two rods in, the rods are permanent and I had to stay in bed flat on my back for 6 months. Now they'e up in days and the rods come out in months.
Gees, sorry for the early morning rant and ramble. Wasnt even half the story. Don' know why I did it, I usually tell no one.

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 02-10-2018, 04:58 AM
  • Skulmoski
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Good luck with your recovery. Keep going. 

I had knee surgery 7 years ago and today I am at about 95%. Without knee surgery I would have been at 50%. I wish I was at 100% but never mind; 95% is great! And with age, we do decline a bit naturally. Since knee surgery, I took up scuba diving and at age 56 became a dive master. I finished the month long dive master course in 17 days. Please know that the time you spend on your recovery can pay big dividends in the future. You might not be at 100% but you can still accomplish a lot and live a full life after knee surgery.

Best wishes
GJS

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 02-10-2018, 06:32 PM
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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(02-10-2018, 04:41 AM)Mouser Wrote: It' amazing how far we'e come. At the time of my first spinal surgery they had no idea what they were dealing with, after numerous violent episodes, spinal taps, they flew my father and I from Taiwan to Japan in an otherwise empty C-133 I think it was. They flew in from stateside the Navy doc who had operated on Kennedy and the Air Force one who took care of Johnson.  A quick last rites and they went in. 8 hours later they found it ,took it out and two weeks later when I could hold my head up they sent me to Lackland AFB stateside, Texas for some nasty radiation.  Later in life when they had to fuse my spine and put two rods in, the rods are permanent and I had to stay in bed flat on my back for 6 months. Now they'e up in days and the rods come out in months.
Gees, sorry for the early morning rant and ramble. Wasnt even half the story. Don' know why I did it, I usually tell no one.

Thanks for sharing. It’s a good story. No need to be sorry, at all. If you ever want to share more of it, we’re good listeners.

You’re right, of course. Current medical science is frequently performing what only a decade ago would have been thought a miracle. My mom passed away 36 years ago from ovarian cancer. I wish I could bring her back for some modern miracles.

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 02-10-2018, 06:36 PM
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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(02-10-2018, 04:58 AM)Skulmoski Wrote: Good luck with your recovery. Keep going. 

I had knee surgery 7 years ago and today I am at about 95%. Without knee surgery I would have been at 50%. I wish I was at 100% but never mind; 95% is great! And with age, we do decline a bit naturally. Since knee surgery, I took up scuba diving and at age 56 became a dive master. I finished the month long dive master course in 17 days. Please know that the time you spend on your recovery can pay big dividends in the future. You might not be at 100% but you can still accomplish a lot and live a full life after knee surgery.

Best wishes
GJS

Thanks so much for the encouragement and for sharing your story. My mantra prior to surgery was, “I want my life back.” Now it’s, “I’m getting my life back!” All the best to you.

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 02-23-2018, 09:08 AM
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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Today is Friday, February 23. I’ve been cleared and encouraged by the PT, surgeon and wife to return to work. The initial plan was to return on March 12, which would have been three months, as per surgeon’s instructions. We started this conversation about two to three weeks ago. At first I thought I’d return on Monday, February 26. Upon consultation with my medical professionals, we decided that March 1 would make more sense - i.e., work two days, get my feet wet (so to speak) have a weekend to rest my soft tissues, and then proceed from there...

I‘ve shown (so they say) remarkable progress with range of motion. On any given day with the PT, I’m 131+ degrees of bilateral flexibility, and almost 0 degrees extension. PT says we’re now working essentially on strength and endurance. Surgeon says I’m healing quite impressively. They say I’m in the top 10% of bilateral TKR patients. My wife agrees that I should go back earlier than planned. My principal is quite happy to welcome me back earlier than expected. The Department of Education wants me to submit paperwork.

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