10-21-2017, 04:27 AM
#21
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(10-20-2017, 11:57 AM)chazt Wrote: I'm glad to hear that cortisone worked so well for you for so many years. It had limited effect for me. 1-2 weeks tops.

As I mentioned, the 2007 cortisone shot lasted more than eight years; the September 2016 shot lasted about as long as yours did.  I have no explanation for the radical disparity.

(10-20-2017, 11:57 AM)chazt Wrote: Ingested NSAIDs wreak havoc with my duadenal ulcer, so they're out of the equation.
I neglected to mention that I've tried many topical preparations; from numbing agents to NSAIDs to creams and balms infused with tetrahydracannabinol. Nothing, nada, zero, zilch.

My introduction to diclofenac was the cute little applicator bottle that my sister-in-law gave to me:

[Image: CA4di0R.jpg]

It looks like a toilet bowl cleaner bottle that shrank in the wash, doesn’t it?  (Looking at it again, I see that I misremembered the katakana when I wrote the previous post:  the Japanese transliteration of diclofenac is zhikurohuenaku, not dekurohuenaku.)  Inside the blue cap is a sponge through which the liquid flows.  As I mentioned, it was more effective as a topical remedy than Ben-Gay or methyl salicylate ointment.  But it differs from those OTC salves and ointments in that it passes into the bloodstream; so applying it, for instance, to my right knee (which was by far the worse one) also effected some relief of the pain in the left knee. Topical application is an alternative means to get diclofenac into one’s system without attacking the stomach lining.  

I should add (so I guess that I shall add) that diclofenac differs from aspirin, Tylenol, Advil, or Aleve also in the location of the pain that it relieves.  I very, very rarely (maybe once a year) take an NSAID for a headache, for instance, but my understanding is that diclofenac would not do as much for my headache, anyway.  Diclofenac is more a muscle and joint specific analgesic, and in that respect it is more like methyl salicylate than like aspirin.  

There will be some pain in the immediate post surgery period, and it is good to have a variety of arrows in your quiver to be able to address that so you can get some needed sleep.  Fortunately, in my one experience with a TKA, and in the experience of my acquaintances who have had one or more TKAs, the recovery period — at least so far as the pain goes — is fairly short, so the light at the end of the tunnel is not far away.  (You mentioned strengthening your quads.  Did your doctor explain to you that he or she is going to slice the quad vertically for almost its entire length to get at the bones in the knee?  It sounds gruesome, but the strength will return to the quad eventually. In the meantime, the flesh on the outside half of the incision, the right side of a right knee or the left side of the left knee, will be strangely numb for a few weeks, but there, too, normality will gradually return.)  

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 10-25-2017, 05:45 PM
#22
  • Nero
  • ACV is my new BFF
  • le montagne
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Charlie, somehow I missed this.
Sorry for your struggles. I think you're on to better days. I agree with your approach through the years... you've done all you could, conservative first.
At least you have shaving and guitar to keep the mind entertained during the recoop.
Good luck with everything.

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 10-26-2017, 10:29 AM
#23
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About 4 years ago at the age of 39 I had my right shoulder replaced. I played along with therapy but eventually the scans showed the arthritis of a 65 year old. Had the talk about a replacement at that age but not being able to sleep and not being able to get my arm over my head I was all for the surgery.

Recovery was uncomfortable but 4 years later glad I took the knife.

Enjoy the new knee.

Sent from my SM-G955U1 using Tapatalk

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 10-26-2017, 07:37 PM
#24
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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(10-25-2017, 05:45 PM)Nero Wrote: Charlie, somehow I missed this.
Sorry for your struggles. I think you're on to better days. I agree with your approach through the years... you've done all you could, conservative first.
At least you have shaving and guitar to keep the mind entertained during the recoop.
Good luck with everything.

Thanks for the good wishes, Matt. I’ll likely be in the hospital for 2 nights. To pass the down time I plan on bringing a well stocked Dopp kit and my wife’s little Taylor GS Mini. And my smart phone to stay connected. Six weeks away and counting...

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 10-26-2017, 07:44 PM
#25
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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(10-26-2017, 10:29 AM)jaxstraww Wrote: About 4 years ago at the age of 39 I had my right shoulder replaced. I played along with therapy but eventually the scans showed the arthritis of a 65 year old. Had the talk about a replacement at that age but not being able to sleep and not being able to get my arm over my head I was all for the surgery.

Recovery was uncomfortable but 4 years later glad I took the knife.

Enjoy the new knee.

Sent from my SM-G955U1 using Tapatalk

Thanks, Jax. I’m expecting recovery to be a bear, but am finally mentally prepared. It’s Bear’s Choice!! Biggrin

You were probably the youngest joint replacement patient on Shakedown Street!

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 10-31-2017, 07:12 AM
#26
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Charlie, i had my left knee replaced in oct of 2005 and it handled all the problems.  pt was tough but really necessary.  I trust all data from Steelman.  they said at that time to choose which knee i wanted done and the other has not been a problem since. you will fly through this     Dave

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 10-31-2017, 05:13 PM
#27
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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(10-31-2017, 07:12 AM)daveinsweethome Wrote: Charlie, i had my left knee replaced in oct of 2005 and it handled all the problems.  pt was tough but really necessary.  I trust all data from Steelman.  they said at that time to choose which knee i wanted done and the other has not been a problem since. you will fly through this     Dave

Dave, thanks for the good thoughts. I’m glad to hear that your experience was successful. If I could get away with doing only one knee I’d do so, but it’s not a realistic option as I’d undoubtedly be back on the table in under a year. Everyone I’ve spoken with who’s had similar experiences has said to do them at the same time because you DON’T want to go through it a second time. It’ll hurt like hell for a couple of weeks, but I’m doing it, baby!

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 10-31-2017, 05:24 PM
#28
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You've got the right attitude Charlie, and that's a major part of a successful recovery.

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 10-31-2017, 07:41 PM
#29
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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(10-31-2017, 05:24 PM)TheLegalRazor Wrote: You've got the right attitude Charlie, and that's a major part of a successful recovery.
Thanks for saying so, Ricardo. I’ll be moving forward in all conceivable ways!

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 11-24-2017, 07:36 PM
#30
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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Well, I went for the pre-surgical examination and class today. The staff was wonderfully kind, patient and informative. Two weeks, two days to go. The countdown to feeling better begins!

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 11-24-2017, 07:43 PM
#31
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Seems you are in good hands with all the caring and humble people around you to take care of things.

All the best again!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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 11-24-2017, 07:51 PM
#32
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(11-24-2017, 07:36 PM)chazt Wrote: Well, I went for the pre-surgical examination and class today. The staff was wonderfully kind, patient and informative. Two weeks, two days to go. The countdown to feeling better begins!

:: thumbs up ::

glad to hear you've got a good team.

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 11-24-2017, 07:54 PM
#33
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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(11-24-2017, 07:36 PM)chazt Wrote: Well, I went for the pre-surgical examination and class today. The staff was wonderfully kind, patient and informative. Two weeks, two days to go. The countdown to feeling better begins!

Great news Charlie!

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 11-24-2017, 08:19 PM
#34
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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Thanks, fellas Smile

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 11-24-2017, 08:19 PM
#35
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Best wishes Charlie, a co-worker of mine had a knee replacement earlier this year before he retired. He done very good and followed up with all of the physical therapy ... i just seen him a while back and he said he feels like a new man and enjoying his retirement. He was walking great and said he has zero pain etc.
 You will do great!

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 11-24-2017, 08:27 PM
#36
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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I appreciate that. My ultimate goal is to go up and down three flights of stairs at whim. And walk pain free as far and as quickly as I did before this nonsense began. When the time is right (3 1/2 years) I’ll be able to retire and Enjoy Everything Everyday.

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 11-25-2017, 02:33 AM
#37
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(10-26-2017, 07:37 PM)chazt Wrote:
(10-25-2017, 05:45 PM)Nero Wrote: Charlie, somehow I missed this.
Sorry for your struggles. I think you're on to better days. I agree with your approach through the years... you've done all you could, conservative first.
At least you have shaving and guitar to keep the mind entertained during the recoop.
Good luck with everything.

Thanks for the good wishes, Matt. I’ll likely be in the hospital for 2 nights. To pass the down time I plan on bringing a well stocked Dopp kit and my wife’s little Taylor GS Mini. And my smart phone to stay connected. Six weeks away and counting...

Your optimism will serve you well, but whether you will be able to use the Dopp kit is not within your control.

More than the direct pain in the knee after my TKA (total knee arthroplasty), my physical discomfort during the recovery in the hospital after the surgery was due to being unable to change position within my hospital bed. Between the IV tube inserted into my left arm and the wires for electronic monitors that were strapped onto my right arm, and being unable to raise my just operated upon right leg to roll my hips even fractions of an inch, I was pretty much cemented into one position in the bed for the entire remainder of the day (my surgeon performed the operation some time around 8:00 a.m.) and through the entire night after the surgery. You would be better served by a set of headphones and a portable player with a well curated playlist than with the contents of a Dopp kit.

Also make certain — now, before the surgery — to check with your insurance carrier: (a) whether use of a CPM (continuous passive motion) machine will be covered, and (b) if there are any restrictions on the coverage. Our insurance carrier made payment for any use of a CPM machine dependent upon the use commencing within the first 24 hours after surgery; so, in addition to having to arrange for a rental machine to be delivered to our home before the surgery for use for approximately two weeks after discharge, I had to ask the surgeon (before the surgery) to specify to the hospital that CPM be started within the same day as the surgery. Had the hospital not done so, I would have been responsible for the entire $1300 rental fee for the CPM machine at home.

Good luck, and know that the short-term discomfort is insignificant compared to the long-term result. Three flights of stairs is a piece o’ cake.

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 11-25-2017, 12:41 PM
#38
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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(11-25-2017, 02:33 AM)Mel S Meles Wrote: Your optimism will serve you well, but whether you will be able to use the Dopp kit is not within your control.

More than the direct pain in the knee after my TKA (total knee arthroplasty), my physical discomfort during the recovery in the hospital after the surgery was due to being unable to change position within my hospital bed. Between the IV tube inserted into my left arm and the wires for electronic monitors that were strapped onto my right arm, and being unable to raise my just operated upon right leg to roll my hips even fractions of an inch, I was pretty much cemented into one position in the bed for the entire remainder of the day (my surgeon performed the operation some time around 8:00 a.m.) and through the entire night after the surgery. You would be better served by a set of headphones and a portable player with a well curated playlist than with the contents of a Dopp kit.

Also make certain — now, before the surgery — to check with your insurance carrier: (a) whether use of a CPM (continuous passive motion) machine will be covered, and (b) if there are any restrictions on the coverage. Our insurance carrier made payment for any use of a CPM machine dependent upon the use commencing within the first 24 hours after surgery; so, in addition to having to arrange for a rental machine to be delivered to our home before the surgery for use for approximately two weeks after discharge, I had to ask the surgeon (before the surgery) to specify to the hospital that CPM be started within the same day as the surgery. Had the hospital not done so, I would have been responsible for the entire $1300 rental fee for the CPM machine at home.

Good luck, and know that the short-term discomfort is insignificant compared to the long-term result. Three flights of stairs is a piece o’ cake.

Good points all around, Tom.

I see what you mean about circumstances being out of my control while in the H. They told me yesterday that I can have a cell phone with a charger. Thanks to the miracle of drag and drop, my phone has hundreds of CDs installed. Will need to get a good set of earbuds for my stay.

Re: being an "immovable object," they explained that my bed will have a "trapeze" which can be used to adjust my position in the bed.

The CPM was mentioned as a necessary part of my in hospital stay, but nothing was said about using one at home. I'll check with the doctor's office and the insurance company this week.

Thanks for sharing your experiences. I'm learning as much as I can from multiple sources and synthesizing how it is (or isn't) applicable to my situation.

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 11-25-2017, 03:22 PM
#39
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the cpm was a life saver in my knee operation.  first nurse hooked it up wrong and wow was that a painful  6 hours till another straightened out.  every knee person I know swears it is vital.

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 11-25-2017, 06:15 PM
#40
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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Dave, that must have been an agonizing six hours. Was it obvious to you right from the start that something was wrong?

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