01-05-2018, 05:45 PM
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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(01-05-2018, 04:40 PM)Mel S Meles Wrote:
(01-04-2018, 09:22 AM)chazt Wrote: The doctor was very impressed with his work. Gave me a few pointers on how to step, stride, etc. He told me not to be concerned about the clicking. I’ve heard this before. Apparently clicking of articulating parts will do that. I’ll set off metal detectors.

Surgeons are like that.  My knee surgeon, in his final pre-op check, signs his name n the knee to be operated on, in indelible ink, to make sure that he operates on the correct knee.  In the post-op examination, he checked on the status of his still-visible signature, and congratulated himself (and me) on how well he had done.  

The clinic with which my surgeon is affiliated has several satellite locations around the metro area to be accessible to patients, and, of course, each of the surgeons has his or her own all-day surgery schedule one or two days a week; my surgeon thus is able to share his examination room and consultation space with another senior surgeon; the staff just changes the name on the door according to who will be using the rooms that day.  Although I chose to have PT at a separate, unaffiliated facility, as luck would have it, “my” therapist formerly had worked in the same clinic where my surgeon does most of his examinations.  She told me that, among the PTs who worked there, the patienta who had had knee surgery by Dr. R (the other surgeon) all commented upon the clicking in their repaired knees, while almost none of the patients (like me) whose surgery had been performed by Dr. C (my surgeon) had that experience.  So, within the clinic, the sound and sensation were known as “the R Click” (with the surgeon’s full surname, not just the initial).  When I passed on the story to Dr. C, he grinned and said that he was not boasting, but ...

The TSA screening system at airports is still working out bugs, and I find it a frequent occasion of wonderment.  For years, I have routinely had a TSA Pre-Check on my boarding pass (frequent flyer and old coot, I am not regarded as a threat), but I now have to go through the full screening *every *single *time.  I always warn the TSA personnel that I have a chunk of chromium cobalt in my knee, and it sometimes, more-often-than-not, shows up on the X-rays . . . but sometimes does not.  OTOH, every time I get scanned, a dark area shows up on the X-ray between my shoulder blades; I have NO idea why.  I have a titanium wristwatch that I did not need to remove and that never set off an alarm before the knee surgery, and belts with non-threatening buckle materials that have not showed up on the occasions when I was randomly selected for a scan; but now, because of the knee, I have to strip all but nekkid before going through the scanner, and — get this — I have to put my boarding pass, the one just issued to me by the kiosk in the airport lobby, in the tray to be x-rayed and swabbed for possible gunpowder residue.  All because of the metal in one knee.

Life in the 21st century.

Way to go Dr. C!

I was told there’s some sort of document I can carry that may help with TSA.

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 01-06-2018, 06:34 AM
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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The sciatica has been creeping back. It’s insidious. I’ve found walking helps as well as anything else. Sleeping is difficult.

Got my first tub of Mike’s delivered yesterday. Unscented, of course. It’s on deck for today’s birthday shave. I’m thinking Chubby 3 and a Schick injector.

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 01-06-2018, 04:33 PM
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(01-05-2018, 05:45 PM)chazt Wrote: I was told there’s some sort of document I can carry that may help with TSA.

Not wanting to be the bearer of bad news, I must advise you not to count on it.  Apparently, there is some degree of local discretion among airports, and many of the minor rules (such as whether or not laptop computers must be removed from their sleeves for scanning) differ from airport to airport.  Because of the possibility of forgery and the checking stations being ill-equipped to detect forgeries, most airports will not accept written documentation in lieu of a physical scan.  As noted, I always tell the TSA agent in advance that my knee will set off an alarm, but the meta-rule appears to be that if there is anything that sets off any alarm, then the passenger will get the full scan treatment, right down to an X-ray of the boarding pass, within which it would be really difficult to conceal explosives.  

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 01-06-2018, 04:40 PM
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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Yes, quite. Wink

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 01-06-2018, 04:48 PM
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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(01-06-2018, 06:34 AM)chazt Wrote: Got my first tub of Mike’s delivered yesterday. Unscented, of course. It’s on deck for today’s birthday shave. I’m thinking Chubby 3 and a Schick injector.

So once I began to think clearly, it was a simple case of duh. Mike’s, check. P-Red preshave, Dickinson’s witch hazel, P-Red AS splash. Check, check, check. Hold the phone, now. Check this out. I’m 59, born in ‘59, so, duh! out comes the Simpsons 59 with an E1 Red Tip with a freshly stropped IP. Boom chugga lugga.

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 01-10-2018, 01:11 PM
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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Started outpatient PT today. Did all kinds of painful things. Even rode a stationary bike for 5 minutes. The bike was fun and easier than expected. Initially I'll be going three times a week, 1 1/2 hours per session.

Smile

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 01-19-2018, 06:38 PM
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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Hard work. Sore. Pain. Exhausted. Hard work. Diligent. Discomfort. My life revolves around these damn legs! Sleep offers little respite. It's weird. I sleep better when I go to bed later. Less tossing and turning. Better rest. Tomorrow. Rest. And work.

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 01-19-2018, 11:18 PM
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Yup, exactly what my neighbor went through, but the reward are knees that work better than before. It might suck to live for one particular part of the body, but hang in there. I haven't been through the knees, but another body part (wrist). Trust me; hang in there and carry on and exceed your PTs expectations. Push yourself. You're doing it for you.

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 01-20-2018, 05:14 AM
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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(01-19-2018, 11:18 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Yup, exactly what my neighbor went through, but the reward are knees that work better than before. I might suck to live for one particular part of the body, but hang in there. I haven't been through the knees, but another body part (wrist). Trust me; hang in there and carry on and exceed your PTs expectations. Push yourself. You're doing it for you.

Thank you for understanding, Brian. It’s the process of regaining my life and functioning. No one can do it except me. No matter how difficult, I push myself through PT sessions. The remainder of the day I rest, the following day I work. It gets frustrating at times, but I’m the one who signed up for this, and I Will succeed.

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 01-22-2018, 08:05 AM
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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Surgery was six weeks ago today.
Initially the surgeon advised it’d be 2 weeks of hell.
He was wrong. It was three weeks.
Although tbh, the first two weeks were more awful than the third week.
It wasn’t until week four though that I began to feel less impaired.
I’m finding that every week brings vast improvement in functioning.
Indeed, every morning I get out of bed and feel better. Stronger.
Range of motion, strength, stability, endurance.
The PT is pleased and impressed.
Me too.
Smile

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 01-22-2018, 09:30 AM
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That's good news Charlie.  You have a ways to go, but it seems the worst is behind you.  It's definitely easier to deal with mentally when you feel some progress every day.

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 01-22-2018, 12:49 PM
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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(01-22-2018, 09:30 AM)TheLegalRazor Wrote: That's good news Charlie.  You have a ways to go, but it seems the worst is behind you.  It's definitely easier to deal with mentally when you feel some progress every day.

That and a good shave, Ricardo Wink

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 01-22-2018, 05:33 PM
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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So I haven't consciously thought much about this until recently. Maybe the last week or so I became aware (cut to the bloody 'oo). I'd been experiencing some pretty significant weight loss - 15 pounds if my bathroom scale is in sync with the H's and surgeon's scales. I asked the doctor about this when the staples came out a few weeks ago. At the time it was obvious to me. He replied that while convalescing the body burns 30-40 % more calories. Ok, fine. I went in on Dec. 11, 5'9", 215 pounds. Three weeks later in the doc's office I was 208. Today I'm weighing in at 200 even. I'd never experienced this phenomenon after my prior arthroscopies. This morning I asked the PT about this. He indicated that it's not uncommon to lose 20 pounds or more in the weeks after such major surgery.

In addition to building my muscles back, one key to my new knees' functional longevity will be to reduce wear and tear on the artificial parts. Obviously I should have tried harder before this major life changing event. I didn't and that's on me. Now I just have to move forward. The maintenance of my weight loss will have a renewed vigor. Gotta be true to my convalescence.

Sorry to babble. Just thought I'd share. Thanks for reading Smile

Edit, Another realization. A possible explanation for feeling cold for the last month and a half. Every time I get a twinge of pain/discomfort/numbness, etc., a wave of cold washes over. Must look into this...

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 01-23-2018, 08:15 AM
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babble all you want.  enjoying the story.  I am 12 years in on a full knee and doing fine.  old age has surpassed the knee pain.

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 01-27-2018, 04:39 PM
  • Mouser
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  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
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(10-19-2017, 07:05 PM)chazt Wrote: Long story short.

I've been plagued with worsening bilateral osteoarthritis in my knees for 12 years. In that time I've had 3 arthroscopies (2, right and 1, left), two years of physical therapy, a bajillion and one cortisone shots, two rounds of hyaluronic acid "gel" shots, stem cell therapy and PRP therapy. I've exhausted all medical options short of total joint replacement. Tried like hell to avoid such major surgery.

This afternoon I consulted with a third doctor, with 2 more surgical consultations scheduled over the next 2 weeks. I liked today's surgeon the best so far - his attitude, approach, overall presentation, thoughts, etc. He listened to me. This doctor was recommended by my friend and chiropractor who had a total knee replacement operation with him a few months ago.

Despite the upcoming final two consultations, I scheduled a date of December 11 with today's doctor. I am sooo ready!

Please share your experiences.

Thank you.

My surgery experience are of the spine not the knee and are a little too many to cover in a post. Let me just say I wish you the best of luck, although I've just realied it may be done by now.

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 01-27-2018, 04:42 PM
  • Mouser
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  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
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And reading further I see that it is. So best of luck with your recovery  and my advice is to be as active as you can.

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 01-27-2018, 06:48 PM
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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(01-27-2018, 04:42 PM)Mouser Wrote: And reading further I see that it is. So best of luck with your recovery  and my advice is to be as active as you can.

Thanks very much. You’re quite correct. I learned from watching my father and father-in-law in the last years of their lives that a huge key to longevity and continuing good health is in fact activity, both physical and mental.

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 01-31-2018, 11:36 AM
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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The last week or so I’ve been getting back to doing more household chores, going for walks as the weather permits, even accompanied G to the grocery store today. Brother, let me tell you, I’m wiped out! The PT tells me that stamina is the last thing to return. Strength and flexibility are easy he said. Thankfully I still have another four weeks or so to build myself up before going back to work. Gotta keep at it.

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 01-31-2018, 03:08 PM
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Yeah, but you can see improvement. You know that it's working. That's great!

I'm in your cheering section.

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 01-31-2018, 06:22 PM
  • chazt
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  • Queens, NY
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(01-31-2018, 03:08 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Yeah, but you can see improvement. You know that it's working. That's great!

I'm in your cheering section.

Thanks, Brian. That’s very kind of you to say.

The PT (Tom) told me today while applying the TENS pads and ice, “Chuck (he calls me Chuck), you’re doing great!” He’s really proud of what I’ve accomplished so far.

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