11-13-2017, 07:55 AM
#1
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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One of the perks to shipping via USPS is they provide free Priority Shipping boxes. I was on the USPS site trying to place a new order last night and it looks like they no longer offer the most popular sized box (for my store anyways). Am I losing my mind or is the 7x7x6 box nowhere to be seen? It seems as if they are trying to push everyone to use flat rate boxes. Ugh

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 11-13-2017, 08:51 AM
#2
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I hope not. I've been using the "regional rate box A" for years. It's less expensive than PM. If they do away with it I'll start to buy boxes from ULine and just raise my prices. I don't want to do that.

But yes, USPS has been finding ways to gouge us for years so that we can pay their ever increasing wages and retirements. Things that we never had any say in negotiating but pay for.

Ship a first class package and whether you want it or not you're going to pay for tracking. It's useless, because if that package is lost or "stuck" somewhere they don't care. But we're forced to pay it. It was a rate increase pure and simple.

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 11-13-2017, 08:55 AM
#3
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 11-13-2017, 09:39 AM
#4
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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(11-13-2017, 08:55 AM)CincyDawg Wrote: https://store.usps.com/store/product/shi...4-P_O_BOX4

Is that the 7x7x6 or is it a larger box? I do not see any dimensions.

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 11-13-2017, 09:53 AM
#5
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(11-13-2017, 09:39 AM)bullgoose Wrote:
(11-13-2017, 08:55 AM)CincyDawg Wrote: https://store.usps.com/store/product/shi...4-P_O_BOX4

Is that the 7x7x6 or is it a larger box? I do not see any dimensions.

It’s the 7x7x6. Dimensions are hidden in the “more” drop down of the Description section.

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 11-13-2017, 10:02 AM
#6
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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(11-13-2017, 09:53 AM)Blackland Razors Wrote:
(11-13-2017, 09:39 AM)bullgoose Wrote:
(11-13-2017, 08:55 AM)CincyDawg Wrote: https://store.usps.com/store/product/shi...4-P_O_BOX4

Is that the 7x7x6 or is it a larger box? I do not see any dimensions.

It’s the 7x7x6. Dimensions are hidden in the “more” drop down of the Description section.

Thank you! I guess I was just thrown by the umpteenth web site update

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 11-14-2017, 12:54 PM
#7
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(11-13-2017, 08:51 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: But yes, USPS has been finding ways to gouge us for years so that we can pay their ever increasing wages and retirements. Things that we never had any say in negotiating but pay for.

Ship a first class package and whether you want it or not you're going to pay for tracking. It's useless, because if that package is lost or "stuck" somewhere they don't care. But we're forced to pay it. It was a rate increase pure and simple.

Your ire appears to be misdirected; alternatively, you appear to be under-informed.  The United States Congress has used the United States Postal Service as a whipping-boy for years, blaming the USPS for deficits that would not exist but for specific pre-funding requirements that exist uniquely for the USPS.  Here is an op-ed article (four and a half years old, but the facts have not changed) that explains the dark alley to which Congress has confined the USPS:  

http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/op-ed-...le/2528340

Quote:Op-Ed: Unjust pre-funding of benefits is killing the postal service
by Fredric Rolando | Apr 28, 2013, 12:00 AM

The Washington Examiner has spilled considerable ink in recent weeks (Sean Higgins, "Postal unions peddling pension funding myth," March 12) seeking to downplay the impact of the 2006 congressional mandate that the United States Postal Service pre-fund future retiree health benefits.

With the fate of this venerable institution -- which is based in the Constitution, was first led by Benjamin Franklin and today plays a key role in our national economy -- likely to be determined by the current Congress, your assertions must be addressed and the facts made clear.

First, some perspective on the problematic pre-funding mandate, which applies to no other agency or company and which accounts for most of the red ink facing the Postal Service.

The recent USPS financial report for the first three months of fiscal 2013, for example, said that in operational terms the Postal Service had a $100 million profit delivering the mail -- six days a week, I might add. It earned revenues of $17.7 billion selling stamps and services (remember, the self-funded USPS doesn't get a dime of taxpayer money) and had expenses of $17.6 billion.

But the quarter's $1.4 billion pre-funding cost led to a reported "loss" of $1.3 billion.

There is much support for rectifying this situation, including from the postmaster general, the postal unions, many industry observers and, most importantly, from hundreds of members of Congress from both parties.

The Washington Examiner has entered this discussion -- in a curious way. You don't deny that the mandate accounts for 80 percent of all the red ink. You don't deny that it singles out the Postal Service. You don't deny that the USPS has to pay $5.5 billion a year over 10 years, or that it's already paid $32 billion. You don't deny that all this has diverted the attention of the Postal Service from developing a forward-looking business plan to meet the needs of an evolving society, as it's done for 200 years.

Instead, you've focused on exactly how far into the future the pre-funding payments cover future retirees. Sean Higgins has penned several pieces aimed at "unraveling" the 75-year "myth." Rather, he says, it's "a much-more reasonable" 50 years.

Just because something is repeated often doesn't make it true, he states. That's true, of course, just as it's true -- and more pertinent here -- that just because a columnist writes something over and over doesn't mean he's right. Or, for that matter, that the point is relevant.

Higgins has made a serious effort to look into the matter. But he confuses the amortization period over which the liability is to be prefunded with the projection period used by the Office of Personnel Management to calculate the liability.

The Postal Service reported to us in 2006 that OPM used a 75-year time horizon to calculate the post-retirement health care costs. OPM recently confirmed to us that applying actuarial methods to current postal workforce life expectancies, the actual liability coverage period is 92 years.

As the legislative language Higgins cited indicates, Congress set out a 40-year amortization period beginning in 2017 -- 50 years from the mandate's effective date -- for any new unfunded liability arising in the future.

In any case, whether the annual payments cover future retiree health benefits 50 years into the future, 75 years or 300 years doesn't change the point: No other entity is required to pre-fund at all, the USPS is being charged $5.5 billion annually to pre-fund, this accounts for 80 percent of postal red ink, and it's leading the agency toward financial ruin while creating an atmosphere that precludes normal future planning.

These are the facts, and this is the situation that lawmakers need to address as the first step toward setting the Postal Service on a financially sustainable course.

(The USPS retirement benefits — if you have a representative in Congress than “you” had a say in negotiating” the mandate — currently are pre-funded deep into the third quarter of the 21st century.)

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 11-14-2017, 02:46 PM
#8
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For me and shipping razors it was cheaper to find my own boxes, Phil i am not close to moving what you move in ptoduct but straights and aftershaves in the bottles I carry take up little room so it was easier and cheaper for me to get a box from UULINE than use a small flat rate box, I am sure USPS loses $$ so they have to make it up somehow and the flat rate boxes are the perfect way for them to do it.

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