11-14-2017, 10:07 PM
#1
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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I don't collect just shaving gear, but an assortment of other objects, too many to bore you all with, however, I thought members might like a little Aboriginal Australian object-making just for an interesting change. What I have here is a tourist boomerang, doubtless, but authentic nonetheless. Older traditional boomerangs wouldn't have had carvings/motifs like this (as you can see: kangaroos and Mallee or Mulga tree, bearing either flowers or fruit). 

This one is hand-fashioned from Mulga and is quite elaborate insofar as it is carved for actual flight. It is hard to show the way in which the wood is curved (and I don't mean the 'bend' in the shape) so that it would fly a fair distance when thrown just the right way, and, doubtless, return. It has 'aerofoil' qualities, therefore, and quite superb in its craftsmanship. Returning boomerangs were used for fun, and not just for hunting small game and birds. They were not used to fell kangaroos and such. This example has 'flight' in mind, however, and isn't just any old tourist object.

This item comes from the Yalata Mission, South Australia, to the north of which lived the traditional Pitjantjatjara- speaking Anangu, or "Spinifex" people. The local word for boomerang is 'kar-li' (sounding a bit like carr-i-lee) and although solidly traditional were sold to passing motorists (few and far between) but, as advised by the missionaries, with decorative carvings to make them more attractive and saleable. 
Pictures:

[Image: 3kgvS5L.jpg]
[Image: gmVgkfk.jpg]

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 11-14-2017, 10:42 PM
#2
  • SCOV
  • Senior Member
  • Minnesota
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Impressive !!  Amazing carving and artwork. Any idea of the age?

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 11-14-2017, 10:51 PM
#3
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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Ah, yes, well, opinion varies between 1920s and 1970s.  I guess there could be a range, but it's about 1950. I see one listed in you-know-where stated as being 1920s (personally, I don't think so) and they are asking a very exaggerated  amount for it, around $400 US including postage. I don't think so. It's a British antiques dealer hoping to take advantage of a naive market. If they can sell it for that much, great, but I have great reservations about the claims this person is making. I paid about $7.50US, but I admit I did get quite a bargain. I am not a seller or dealer. The $$ don't matter to me; I just love it as an object. Much older aditional boomerangs are truly superb and absolutely do fetch high prices. I'd like to see some form of remuneration going back to traditional land owners/makers.

I have tried to show the curve in the photo below, but it doesn't really do the workmanship justice.

[Image: HqBNdJl.jpg]

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 11-15-2017, 03:53 AM
#4
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Very cool Shaun.  Do you know how to throw a boomerang?

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 11-15-2017, 04:14 AM
#5
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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(11-15-2017, 03:53 AM)TheLegalRazor Wrote: Very cool Shaun.  Do you know how to throw a boomerang?

Something about a bear in the woods...? Smile

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