11-25-2017, 05:36 AM
#1
  • DayMan
  • Senior Member
  • Tennessee
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My wife bought me an Ever Ready 150 at an antique store. The handle is in over all good condition, but I want to clean and polish it. What do you use to polish a brush? Anyone know what size the knot is? I want to put a new knot in as well.

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 11-25-2017, 08:43 AM
#2
  • jar
  • Active Member
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I generally start with water and a tooth brush, then maybe a coat of wax if needed.  But I also enjoy using the original knots and only reknot when absolutely necessary.

The first eight brushes on the bottom shelf are all EverReady brushes with their original knots:
[Image: large.jpg]

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 11-25-2017, 10:48 AM
#3
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(11-25-2017, 05:36 AM)DayMan Wrote: My wife bought me an Ever Ready 150 at an antique store. The handle is in over all good condition, but I want to clean and polish it. What do you use to polish a brush?  Anyone know what size the knot is? I want to put a new knot in as well.


There are different types of 150s.  It would be better if you posted a picture.

It's best if you remove the existing knot and then measure the knot hole opening.   

I use Meguiar's PlastX to polish.  It's available at most auto parts stores, WalMart, and online.

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 11-25-2017, 05:43 PM
#4
  • DayMan
  • Senior Member
  • Tennessee
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(11-25-2017, 10:48 AM)Gigster Wrote:
(11-25-2017, 05:36 AM)DayMan Wrote: My wife bought me an Ever Ready 150 at an antique store. The handle is in over all good condition, but I want to clean and polish it. What do you use to polish a brush?  Anyone know what size the knot is? I want to put a new knot in as well.


There are different types of 150s.  It would be better if you posted a picture.

It's best if you remove the existing knot and then measure the knot hole opening.   

I use Meguiar's PlastX to polish.  It's available at most auto parts stores, WalMart, and online.
Here's a picture of the brush. The handle doesn't look scratched or anything. It's just dirty, but I definitely need a new knot. 

[Image: CU9QiPM.jpg]

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 11-25-2017, 06:31 PM
#5
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18mm knot.  Original knot loft varied slightly from brush to brush.  I have one measured at 42.5mm and one at 43.8mm.

There is plenty of room to open the knot hole if you want to put a larger knot into the handle.  

Again, before you order a knot, it's best to remove the existing knot and take your measurements.  If you increase the knot hole, make the increase 1 - 1.5mm larger than the knot you are going to install into the handle.  For example, you want to use a 22mm knot.  Increase the knot hole diameter to 23 - 23.5mm.  

Measurements are important.  Remove the existing knot.  Take a diameter measurement.  Order the new knot.  Once it arrives, take a diameter measurement of the glue bump just able the knot plug.  THEN. . . . .increase the knot hole diameter.

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 11-28-2017, 04:20 AM
#6
  • DayMan
  • Senior Member
  • Tennessee
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Thanks for the tips. I would assume that a 22mm knot is about as big as I should go since the original is only 18? I was hoping to put a 24mm black synthetic because I thought it would look good with the red and white, but 22 is a little small for synthetic knots, so I'll probably get a 22mm badger knot.

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 11-28-2017, 04:29 AM
#7
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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(11-25-2017, 06:31 PM)Gigster Wrote: 18mm knot.  Original knot loft varied slightly from brush to brush.  I have one measured at 42.5mm and one at 43.8mm.

There is plenty of room to open the knot hole if you want to put a larger knot into the handle.  

Again, before you order a knot, it's best to remove the existing knot and take your measurements.  If you increase the knot hole, make the increase 1 - 1.5mm larger than the knot you are going to install into the handle.  For example, you want to use a 22mm knot.  Increase the knot hole diameter to 23 - 23.5mm.  

Measurements are important.  Remove the existing knot.  Take a diameter measurement.  Order the new knot.  Once it arrives, take a diameter measurement of the glue bump just able the knot plug.  THEN. . . . .increase the knot hole diameter.
Sounds like you’ve done this before...
(11-28-2017, 04:20 AM)DayMan Wrote: Thanks for the tips. I would assume that a 22mm knot is about as big as I should go since the original is only 18? I was hoping to put a 24mm black synthetic because I thought it would look good with the red and white, but 22 is a little small for synthetic knots, so I'll probably get a 22mm badger knot.
Good luck and have fun with your project. It’s a cool looking shave artifact that you’ll restore to functional use! Enjoy Smile

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 11-28-2017, 08:01 AM
#8
  • BSWoodturning
  • Co-Owner, Brad Sears ShaveWorks
  • Maryland Eastern Shore
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(11-28-2017, 04:20 AM)DayMan Wrote: Thanks for the tips. I would assume that a 22mm knot is about as big as I should go since the original is only 18? I was hoping to put a 24mm black synthetic because I thought it would look good with the red and white, but 22 is a little small for synthetic knots, so I'll probably get a 22mm badger knot.

The 150's a great brush to restore.  I'd suggest having your new knot in hand before playing with the socket size.  Many knots (like TGN and Shavemac) do call for a somewhat larger socket while others (WSP comes immediately to mind) want a socket equal to the advertised knot diameter.  Just take your time and have fun!

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 11-28-2017, 05:16 PM
#9
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(11-28-2017, 04:29 AM)chazt Wrote:
(11-25-2017, 06:31 PM)Gigster Wrote: 18mm knot.  Original knot loft varied slightly from brush to brush.  I have one measured at 42.5mm and one at 43.8mm.

There is plenty of room to open the knot hole if you want to put a larger knot into the handle.  

Again, before you order a knot, it's best to remove the existing knot and take your measurements.  If you increase the knot hole, make the increase 1 - 1.5mm larger than the knot you are going to install into the handle.  For example, you want to use a 22mm knot.  Increase the knot hole diameter to 23 - 23.5mm.  

Measurements are important.  Remove the existing knot.  Take a diameter measurement.  Order the new knot.  Once it arrives, take a diameter measurement of the glue bump just able the knot plug.  THEN. . . . .increase the knot hole diameter.
Sounds like you’ve done this before...


Yeah, once, or twice. . . .or a couple hundred times.  lol

It's fun.

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 11-28-2017, 05:25 PM
#10
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(11-28-2017, 04:20 AM)DayMan Wrote: Thanks for the tips. I would assume that a 22mm knot is about as big as I should go since the original is only 18? I was hoping to put a 24mm black synthetic because I thought it would look good with the red and white, but 22 is a little small for synthetic knots, so I'll probably get a 22mm badger knot.


A 24mm knot is pushing the limits on a 150.  

Do you have calipers?  If so, open it to 24 - 25mm and rest your calipers on top of the handle and center it.  

If you don't have calipers, measure and cut a piece of paper that 24 - 25mm. 

Either will give you an idea of how a 24mm knot will look.  

What you don't want to do is make the knot hole so large you lose the shoulders of the handle.  The shoulders are the areas of the handle to the left and right of the knot.  Hopefully that make sense.  If not, let me know and I'll post a picture to illustrate.

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 11-28-2017, 07:03 PM
#11
  • DayMan
  • Senior Member
  • Tennessee
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(11-28-2017, 04:29 AM)chazt Wrote:
(11-25-2017, 06:31 PM)Gigster Wrote: 18mm knot.  Original knot loft varied slightly from brush to brush.  I have one measured at 42.5mm and one at 43.8mm.

There is plenty of room to open the knot hole if you want to put a larger knot into the handle.  

Again, before you order a knot, it's best to remove the existing knot and take your measurements.  If you increase the knot hole, make the increase 1 - 1.5mm larger than the knot you are going to install into the handle.  For example, you want to use a 22mm knot.  Increase the knot hole diameter to 23 - 23.5mm.  

Measurements are important.  Remove the existing knot.  Take a diameter measurement.  Order the new knot.  Once it arrives, take a diameter measurement of the glue bump just able the knot plug.  THEN. . . . .increase the knot hole diameter.
Sounds like you’ve done this before...

(11-28-2017, 04:20 AM)DayMan Wrote: Thanks for the tips. I would assume that a 22mm knot is about as big as I should go since the original is only 18? I was hoping to put a 24mm black synthetic because I thought it would look good with the red and white, but 22 is a little small for synthetic knots, so I'll probably get a 22mm badger knot.
Good luck and have fun with your project. It’s a cool looking shave artifact that you’ll restore to functional use! Enjoy Smile
Thank you.  I like the look of the EverReady brushes.  I'm looking forward to getting it ready to use.
(11-28-2017, 08:01 AM)BSWoodturning Wrote:
(11-28-2017, 04:20 AM)DayMan Wrote: Thanks for the tips. I would assume that a 22mm knot is about as big as I should go since the original is only 18? I was hoping to put a 24mm black synthetic because I thought it would look good with the red and white, but 22 is a little small for synthetic knots, so I'll probably get a 22mm badger knot.

The 150's a great brush to restore.  I'd suggest having your new knot in hand before playing with the socket size.  Many knots (like TGN and Shavemac) do call for a somewhat larger socket while others (WSP comes immediately to mind) want a socket equal to the advertised knot diameter.  Just take your time and have fun!
I appreciate the response.  I didn't know the loose knots offered guidelines on the socket size.  I've never done this before.  I hope I don't mess it up.
(11-28-2017, 05:25 PM)Gigster Wrote:
(11-28-2017, 04:20 AM)DayMan Wrote: Thanks for the tips. I would assume that a 22mm knot is about as big as I should go since the original is only 18? I was hoping to put a 24mm black synthetic because I thought it would look good with the red and white, but 22 is a little small for synthetic knots, so I'll probably get a 22mm badger knot.


A 24mm knot is pushing the limits on a 150.  

Do you have calipers?  If so, open it to 24 - 25mm and rest your calipers on top of the handle and center it.  

If you don't have calipers, measure and cut a piece of paper that 24 - 25mm. 

Either will give you an idea of how a 24mm knot will look.  

What you don't want to do is make the knot hole so large you lose the shoulders of the handle.  The shoulders are the areas of the handle to the left and right of the knot.  Hopefully that make sense.  If not, let me know and I'll post a picture to illustrate.
That's a good idea.  I'll do that.  I didn't know the area to the side of the knot was called the shoulders, but that is the part I was worried about in going to big.  Your suggestion will help me with that so I'll know what will work before I order.

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 11-28-2017, 07:10 PM
#12
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I just finished another 150 and yep I stuffed a 24mm knot in it.  I surrendered some of the shoulder but not enough to screw up the look.  Opening the socket up assures you will lose the knot shelf (it's a hollow handle).  But I do that often anyway and fill the handle with epoxy/sand to the level I wish to set the knot.  It gives the hollow handle a pleasing heft.  Before knotting, sand with 400/1000/2000 progression wet and you won't  need any wax.  It'll be gleaming better than new.  Have find!

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 11-29-2017, 05:25 AM
#13
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(11-28-2017, 07:03 PM)DayMan Wrote: That's a good idea.  I'll do that.  I didn't know the area to the side of the knot was called the shoulders, but that is the part I was worried about in going to big.  Your suggestion will help me with that so I'll know what will work before I order.


The correct terminology for the top part of the handle is "ferrule."  When describing that specific area of the handle, shoulder(s) tends be more descriptive and understandable.  

First time out in restoring a brush can be a little nerve racking - uncharted territory, so to speak.  Three rules of thumb:  go slow, measure twice, and ask questions.  It will turn out OK.

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