02-26-2018, 08:39 AM
#1
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Any Pilots around ? Past/Present/Future ? I fly a "home built" Mosquito helicopter.
[Image: 79c1bc3.jpg]

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 02-26-2018, 12:27 PM
#2
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Not a pilot - never had the urge to try - but used to do heavy maintenance as well as snag work on both fixed and rotary wing. If it hadn't been for the jet jockeys the squadron would have a 100% serviceability rate - multi engine and RW pilots tends to be a much nicer bunch, and less likely to over stress the air-frame Wink
I still considers 'choppers to be roughly 40,000 parts in close formation, the failure of any one can ruin your day Tongue

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 02-26-2018, 02:07 PM
#3
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(02-26-2018, 12:27 PM)WegianWarrior Wrote: Not a pilot - never had the urge to try - but used to do heavy maintenance as well as snag work on both fixed and rotary wing. If it hadn't been for the jet jockeys the squadron would have a 100% serviceability rate - multi engine and RW pilots tends to be a much nicer bunch, and less likely to over stress the air-frame Wink
I still considers 'choppers to be roughly 40,000 parts in close formation, the failure of any one can ruin your day Tongue

I was taught that based upon the "Laws Of Aerodynamics" Bumble Bees and helicopters can't fly. Bumble Bee because body mass far greater than wing lift area, same for Rotary Wing. 
But....God made the Bumble Bee too dumb to know any better, same for Chopper Pilots. We have to be nice, it well may be our last day on Earth.....but I love Rotary Wings.

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 02-26-2018, 02:42 PM
#4
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Pretty neat! Your very own magic carpet!

How much maintenance is there on them?

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 02-26-2018, 02:49 PM
#5
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Hey that's pretty cool.  I don't see a registration number on it.  Is it registered as an experimental aircraft?  How many man-hours in the construction?

I used to fly fixed wing, and I still have nightmares about being in a helicopter in an uncontrolled fall from the sky.

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 02-26-2018, 04:28 PM
#6
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(02-26-2018, 02:42 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Pretty neat! Your very own magic carpet!

How much maintenance is there on them?

2- 4 hrs. per 1 hr. of flight time. Until you reach 100 hrs. of flight, you replace about everything, including engine.

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 02-26-2018, 04:32 PM
#7
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(02-26-2018, 02:49 PM)BrickHud Wrote: Hey that's pretty cool.  I don't see a registration number on it.  Is it registered as an experimental aircraft?  How many man-hours in the construction?

I used to fly fixed wing, and I still have nightmares about being in a helicopter in an uncontrolled fall from the sky.

It's an Ultra-light, No registration or license required. You just buy...build...fly...  Aaaaa
Time to build, from 80 hrs. to 8 years.... Undecided

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 02-26-2018, 05:53 PM
#8
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • NYC
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Wow! Buy it, build it, fly it. That’s wild!

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 02-26-2018, 06:15 PM
#9
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(02-26-2018, 05:53 PM)chazt Wrote: Wow! Buy it, build it, fly it. That’s wild!

Aint America great !  I think it's the only country you don't have to have a license  or registration for it. It's a Mosquito.

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 02-26-2018, 09:05 PM
#10
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Brick' there are videos on youtube showing autorotation. That saves you from a power outage. If something goes wrong with the rotary wings I think you might be screwed. But that's any helicopter. I'm also not a 'chopper pilot, I just jumped from them (not often enough). I knew back then that as long as it was still above me and going forward when I jumped I was good. Chopper jumps were like taking candy from a baby.

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 02-26-2018, 10:51 PM
#11
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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I held a Private Pilots License up until 8 years ago when due to health reasons I could not get it renewed.  I owned Cessna N11454, a 150 but sold it to our local Wausau Flying Service.  The plane is used for training and based at our Wausau Downtown Airport.  In the picture of the airport, my house is located 8 blocks away to the right, outside of this picture.

My old plane.

[Image: 3C8D6VR.jpg]

Aerial view of the airport.

[Image: jE9cjHz.jpg]

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 02-26-2018, 11:42 PM
#12
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(02-26-2018, 02:07 PM)zipper Wrote:
(02-26-2018, 12:27 PM)WegianWarrior Wrote: Not a pilot - never had the urge to try - but used to do heavy maintenance as well as snag work on both fixed and rotary wing. If it hadn't been for the jet jockeys the squadron would have a 100% serviceability rate - multi engine and RW pilots tends to be a much nicer bunch, and less likely to over stress the air-frame Wink
I still considers 'choppers to be roughly 40,000 parts in close formation, the failure of any one can ruin your day Tongue

I was taught that based upon the "Laws Of Aerodynamics" Bumble Bees and helicopters can't fly. Bumble Bee because body mass far greater than wing lift area, same for Rotary Wing. 
But....God made the Bumble Bee too dumb to know any better, same for Chopper Pilots. We have to be nice, it well may be our last day on Earth.....but I love Rotary Wings.

As I'm sure you're aware the laws of aerodynamics can fully explain both RW (same as FW, really) and bumblebees (vortexes) can fly... but we keep telling jet jockeys that they can't so they can feel superior Wink

Seriously though; I suspect the difference is mainly due to the fact that most RW and all multi engine pilots are taught to they have to rely on their crew at all times... but a jet jockey have been told and trained to fly alone.

I'll just wrap up with an old technical joke; What is the most important bolt in the airframe? The one you find in your pocket as the plane is taxing towards take-off...

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 02-27-2018, 03:58 AM
#13
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(02-26-2018, 11:42 PM)WegianWarrior Wrote:
(02-26-2018, 02:07 PM)zipper Wrote:
(02-26-2018, 12:27 PM)WegianWarrior Wrote: Not a pilot - never had the urge to try - but used to do heavy maintenance as well as snag work on both fixed and rotary wing. If it hadn't been for the jet jockeys the squadron would have a 100% serviceability rate - multi engine and RW pilots tends to be a much nicer bunch, and less likely to over stress the air-frame Wink
I still considers 'choppers to be roughly 40,000 parts in close formation, the failure of any one can ruin your day Tongue

I was taught that based upon the "Laws Of Aerodynamics" Bumble Bees and helicopters can't fly. Bumble Bee because body mass far greater than wing lift area, same for Rotary Wing. 
But....God made the Bumble Bee too dumb to know any better, same for Chopper Pilots. We have to be nice, it well may be our last day on Earth.....but I love Rotary Wings.

As I'm sure you're aware the laws of aerodynamics can fully explain both RW (same as FW, really) and bumblebees (vortexes) can fly... but we keep telling jet jockeys that they can't so they can feel superior Wink

Seriously though; I suspect the difference is mainly due to the fact that most RW and all multi engine pilots are taught to they have to rely on their crew at all times... but a jet jockey have been told and trained to fly alone.

I'll just wrap up with an old technical joke; What is the most important bolt in the airframe? The one you find in your pocket as the plane is taxing towards take-off...
When I was an Army Pilot, that's why the Crew Chief flew with the aircraft.  He'd have that bolt with him.

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