03-10-2018, 02:55 AM
#1
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Hello Shave Nook,


Unfortunately, I am having another reaction (on my skin) that is not something we talk about in a shaving forum. Now we do talk about shaving soaps and body bar soaps. But how often do you see a thread in a forum about liquid dispenser soap that is used for sanitizing your hands. I am pretty sure the one I am using at work is making the skin on the tops of my hands feel like they are being eaten alive by having to constantly and habitually for sanitary prep. 

It makes me feel disappointed that the function intended of this type of soap may work on my skin, but it does not work with my skin, neither under cold or hot water. This soap, dare I say, may have synthetic foaming agents, but even if it doesn't, I really don't care. I applied mango butter before work to my hands, and used avocado oil towards the end of my shift as well. Then I applied shea butter after my shift. My skin was so itchy, imagine my skin feeling the need to itch off whatever is residue of the liquid soap and scrape it off with your fingernails.

I will definitely have to prepare myself for using gloves and some alternative to this soap for my skin. Here I am at the same time edging to get all comfort that is achievable within my facial shave. If I get good shave but not a great shave, then that can feel like a bit of failure. I strive for high standards in my shaves to keep my face "calm" but ready and more prepared for the next shave. Sometimes that results in a tad bit of red face and minor nicks most shaves. But that can happen in both my absolute best feeling shaves and also "good" shaves. 

The good shaves don't gain that sense of relief as much as how you feel after a great, close yet also comfortable finish to your shave. The skin remains calm, maintains suppleness in hydration, and looks replenished and fresh. Right now, I am upset with myself for being so capable of feeling and reading my facial skin, yet I am totally ignorant of how I spent time rubbing a soap my hands all day without stopping to let my skin speak. If I took a picture of my hands, it may not look all that exciting or inflamed as you might hope for consider I am complaining to the world a bit in this post. 

Forgive me, please, my point being we join a discussion hub to take and give information and experience to your own and others daily skin care. Sometimes, that means people discussing shaves, skin butters and oils, shampoos, deodorants, edt, etc, is we might use in our daily routine in combination with our skin. It should compliment the skin in it's natural state. One thing that pops into my head is how powerful I truly believe mango butter to be on my facial skin which is skin I consider quite sensitive. But even using a bunch of mango butter wouldn't really reverse spending a whole shift rubbing something that doesn't work with my skin. 

All I can say is this:

Damn.

I hope none of you have to deal with skin feeling this uncomfortable, ever, and anywhere. Stay well and keep your skin calm my friends.

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 03-10-2018, 04:20 AM
#2
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I'm sorry you're having to deal with this.  Hand sanitizers have multiple ingredients which could irritate your skin, incuding alcohol, antibacterial agents, and assorted chemicals.  Ironically, for many hand sanitation purposes, plain soap works fine.

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 03-10-2018, 04:54 AM
#3
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Get some hydrocortisone cream to deal with the itching, and redness, and wear nitrile gloves so you can limit exposure. Also you could try a different hand sanitizer.

Clayton

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using Tapatalk

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 03-10-2018, 05:26 AM
#4
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • NYC
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Zac, is it possible for you to use a gentle, all natural soap, and simply wash and rinse thoroughly?

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 03-10-2018, 06:05 AM
#5
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I have the same problem at work. They change soap line late last year so now I carry a small travel bottle with Dr Bronners unscneted liquid soap in my pocket. I don't need sanitized hands for work. 
I wear gloves as much as I can. Workers hands and sunflower oil have made a mayor difference.
Oh, when my hands are in bad condition I carry a second handkerchief for drying.

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 03-10-2018, 10:52 AM
#6
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We have the most horrific soap I have ever encountered in the soap dispensers at work.  I can't use it.  I think it must be designed to clean engines or some heavy-duty industrial things.

Now, my hands don't tend to get dirty, so it's not a big deal.  And, they don't have to be ultra-clean either.  So, I just use warm water.  And, if I'm in the mood, a drop of moisturizing hand sanitizer after I dry them.

I'd follow the advice of Lloydrm, and carry a small bottle of your own liquid soap. I use Nature Clean liquid soap at home. Never have any problems with it.

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 03-14-2018, 10:19 PM
#7
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Thanks for your comments. I started wearing my gloves a bit more frequently when I can. But there is some good news. My boss said that he would be fine reimbursing me for soap that was compatible with my skin to use while at work. Unfortunately, my fingers and skin are peeling and splitting in many areas. This is still the result after continuous moisturizing with shea, mango butter, and avocado oils. I may investigate further once I have the brand and identification of formula to ask what the manufacture is using in it.

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 03-15-2018, 05:41 AM
#8
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What is the soap or what are the ingredients?  Most liquid soaps are just detergents and chemicals.  

My reciepe is as follows:  water, glycerine, olive oil, coconut oil, castor oil, sunflower oil, lye, citric acid, vitamine e essential oils.  This is really all you  need.  I highly recommend Dr bronners, but stay away from the pepermint, it can be drying

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 03-15-2018, 07:22 AM
#9
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In winters I tend to get the same condition on my hands and face, hands being more damaged. Chaffed, broken and very very rough skin on hands led me to a dermatologist. The first question she asked me was how many times in a day do i wash my hands and i replied 14-15 types using a hand wash. I didn't had to ask her any further questions but I still went on. She told me it could be a skin condition and advised me to use a gentle hand wash, prescribed me an "Aveeno" hand moisturizer and seal it with a SPA water, which worked really well . 

If this condition of yours remain throughout the year , its more concerning but if it is a temporary thing it can be dealt with easily. In either case, would suggest you to see a dermatologist.

BTW It might help , if you could name the brand you are using.

Good Luck!

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 03-15-2018, 04:12 PM
#10
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There are very few liquid soaps that I can actually use.  Hand sanitizers also give me fits.  In addition to really dry skin, I get eczema blisters, mostly on the sides of my fingers, and a bit on my palms.  My sensitive skin is one of the reasons my wife started making soap in the first place.

I have carried a small squirt bottle of Dr. Bronner's, because you never know what kind of soap you'll find in a public bathroom.

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 03-16-2018, 05:49 AM
#11
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(03-15-2018, 04:12 PM)Shannon Wrote: There are very few liquid soaps that I can actually use.  Hand sanitizers also give me fits.  In addition to really dry skin, I get eczema blisters, mostly on the sides of my fingers, and a bit on my palms.  My sensitive skin is one of the reasons my wife started making soap in the first place.

I have carried a small squirt bottle of Dr. Bronner's, because you never know what kind of soap you'll find in a public bathroom.

+1 on the Dr Bronner, it's a soap that no one I've talked to have had any sort of reaction to.

I had to change career tracks about fifteen years ago from technical (heave maintenance and snag work) to operations after I got dry hands and eczema; not as a reaction to the hand cleaner we had available, but after contact with the hydraulic oil. Enough of the volatiles would come through the nitril gloves to set me off, even when doubled up.

Even to this day I'm sensitive to some oils and solvents... and react - although not to the level described in the OP - to a couple of brands of cheap hand soaps. I can easily avoid those though, so overall I got no reason to complain.

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 03-16-2018, 12:12 PM
#12
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • NYC
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Yes. -1 to solvents! When I was a very young man my job involved using an extremely irritating (to me) solvent. Since then, every winter the skin on the sides of my forefingers and thumbs cracks along the whorls of my fingerprints. Shea butter has been a godsend.

Re: Dr. Bronner's; they make an unscented bar soap in a pale blue wrapper. Great stuff!

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 03-16-2018, 12:48 PM
#13
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Liquid soaps generally have a ton of detergents and chemicals in them.  I would also stay away from soap made with palm and coconut oils.  These over clean the natural oils off the skin and dry it out.  Going with an olive oil based soap is the way to go

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