06-25-2018, 09:50 AM
#41
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I find this best. Load brush with soap and lather hard on side of my face. Then paint the lather on your face, repeating face lather again, and keep painting it on rest of face. Rich creamy lather for several passes. I scrape the lather off the brush on my chin. I have sensitive skin but this method does nothing but good for my face.

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 07-01-2018, 09:39 PM
#42
  • Vlasta
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  • Hong Kong
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I read recently that swirling the brush around in a circular motion can damage the bristles.... so I started to paint now for most of the time.

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 07-02-2018, 01:53 AM
#43
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(07-01-2018, 09:39 PM)Vlasta Wrote: I read recently that swirling the brush around in a circular motion can damage the bristles.... so I started to paint now for most of the time.

That's correct ONLY when you swirl and press down very hard.  And after doing both for extended period of time, not right the way.  Otherwise, no problem.  Many are doing it (the normal way) all the time, me included Smile

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 07-02-2018, 05:50 AM
#44
  • Vlasta
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  • Hong Kong
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(07-02-2018, 01:53 AM)Martini Wrote:
(07-01-2018, 09:39 PM)Vlasta Wrote: I read recently that swirling the brush around in a circular motion can damage the bristles.... so I started to paint now for most of the time.

That's correct ONLY when you swirl and press down very hard.  And after doing both for extended period of time, not right the way.  Otherwise, no problem.  Many are doing it (the normal way) all the time, me included Smile

Not saying you can't - just that the advice I read in this article from 35 years ago in the NYT, says it can damage the brush. The advice came from a Simpsons expert. Here is the article and here is the excerpt.

https://www.nytimes.com/1983/01/07/style...brush.html


"But, says Stan Archer, the works manager of Simpson, a good shaving brush will last 15 to 20 years if cared for properly. It should always be rinsed thoroughly after use and all excess moisture shaken off. The most common fault among shavers is that they tend to lather up with a circular motion of the brush, Mr. Archer says. ''Nothing will spoil a good brush faster. You're twisting the hairs against themselves. You should always use straight up-and-down strokes - in the shaving bowl and on your face - and don't apply too much pressure.''

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 07-24-2018, 11:48 PM
#45
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Just a quick question:

I usually lather up in a bowl, then load the brush and try to paint the lather to my face. But somehow it just won't "stick" properly. I get a bubbly film of lather on my cheeks, chin and throat, but the "real" creamy, foamy lather I take from the bowl, just stays in/on the brush, and as I try to paint it, just gets worked downwards onto the handle of the brush and my hands.

Any tips or help?

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 07-25-2018, 02:32 AM
#46
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Hi, it sounds like there is too much water in the lather. Do try face lathering, dipping tip of your brush in water if you feel the lather is too thick. The cheek is a wonderful place to lather as you can feel when the lather is perfect. When it is, you can paint away enjoying the silky feel on your skin, conditioning it for the shave. Bowls are only good for retailers making money!! !

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 07-25-2018, 02:53 AM
#47
  • Mouser
  • Senior Member
  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
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(07-24-2018, 11:48 PM)LithiumDawn Wrote: Just a quick question:

I usually lather up in a bowl, then load the brush and try to paint the lather to my face. But somehow it just won't "stick" properly. I get a bubbly film of lather on my cheeks, chin and throat, but the "real" creamy, foamy lather I take from the bowl, just stays in/on the brush, and as I try to paint it, just gets worked downwards onto the handle of the brush and my hands.

Any tips or help?

When I first started wet shaving I found face lathering much easier to get right , there is immediate tactile feedback,  so I face lathered to shave and I practiced bowl lathering whenever I could, painting it on my arm until I  got it right.  It worked for me and now I lather whichever way I am in the mood for.

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 07-25-2018, 03:55 AM
#48
  • Vlasta
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  • Hong Kong
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(07-24-2018, 11:48 PM)LithiumDawn Wrote: Just a quick question:

I usually lather up in a bowl, then load the brush and try to paint the lather to my face. But somehow it just won't "stick" properly. I get a bubbly film of lather on my cheeks, chin and throat, but the "real" creamy, foamy lather I take from the bowl, just stays in/on the brush, and as I try to paint it, just gets worked downwards onto the handle of the brush and my hands.

Any tips or help?

Maybe wet your face ? Or do you have oily skin? maybe a wash with regular facial soap will help before lathering up?

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 07-25-2018, 05:23 AM
#49
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(07-25-2018, 03:55 AM)Vlasta Wrote:
(07-24-2018, 11:48 PM)LithiumDawn Wrote: Maybe wet your face ? Or do you have oily skin? maybe a wash with regular facial soap will help before lathering up?

I always wet my face before doing the lathering. Most of the time I use a hot, wet cloth for 3 mins, followed by Proraso Preshave Cream.

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 07-25-2018, 08:17 AM
#50
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(07-02-2018, 05:50 AM)Vlasta Wrote: I read in this article from 35 years ago in the NYT, says it can damage the brush. The advice came from a Simpsons expert. Here is the article and here is the excerpt.

https://www.nytimes.com/1983/01/07/style...brush.html

"But, says Stan Archer, the works manager of Simpson, a good shaving brush will last 15 to 20 years if cared for properly. It should always be rinsed thoroughly after use and all excess moisture shaken off. The most common fault among shavers is that they tend to lather up with a circular motion of the brush, Mr. Archer says. ''Nothing will spoil a good brush faster. You're twisting the hairs against themselves. You should always use straight up-and-down strokes - in the shaving bowl and on your face - and don't apply too much pressure.''

Simpson merged with Vulfix some years back.  I have here a Vulfix 2234S (Super Badger) brush that I bought about a decade after that 1983 article.  I used the brush daily, 365 days a year, for about a quarter century, and invariably I lathered on the puck with circular motions (though not pressing down) before applying the lather to my face with a mixture of swirling and painting motions.  As far as I know, the brush never lost a hair; I still have it, though I seldom use it these days because I “graduated” to a Semogue 2-band badger that has more backbone.  

My assessment, therefore, is that the important part of the advice is to avoid mashing the bristles, and that the advice not to swirl is relatively insignificant.

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 07-25-2018, 04:20 PM
#51
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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I face lather exclusively using only paint brush strokes. Creating rich, luxurious lather on my face is my favorite part of shaving. The process takes time. Patience and time. In my experience, more time spent face lathering = a better shave. I don’t use my fingers to push lather into my whiskers, simply let the brush do its job.

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 07-25-2018, 11:42 PM
#52
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Natural brushes can't be very delicate!  I bet the badger  or boar didn't be too careful with their hair!  They play rough!

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 07-27-2018, 07:12 AM
#53
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(03-30-2018, 08:56 AM)BrickHud Wrote: Painting lather from the bowl works great for me.  I don't find that scrubbing by face-lathering improves the shave.  That's just me obviously.

Same for me - I do working it into my beard but usually in paint like brush strokes.  I am not very proficient at face lathering and bowl lathering gives me a much better shaving experience.  Since the lather is already built in the bowl, that component is accounted for so I just have to work it into my beard.

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 08-15-2018, 01:58 PM
#54
  • DaveL
  • Member
  • Houston, Texas
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I face lather using swirling strokes and then use painting strokes to smooth it out.

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 08-15-2018, 02:24 PM
#55
  • dmshaver
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  • Kansas City
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(08-15-2018, 01:58 PM)DaveL Wrote: I face lather using swirling strokes and then use painting strokes to smooth it out.

Here’s another Dave that it does the same way. Face lather, circular motions to exfoliate my skin & work up the lather, then painting strokes to smooth it out.

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 08-27-2018, 03:56 AM
#56
  • Mouser
  • Senior Member
  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
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It seems to me that "painting" the lather on was the original method and barbers always have and still do use. I'm pretty sure on just a gut feeling that bowl lathering was /is how royalty shaves. Just a guess.  I remember my grandfather working up the lather in the mug right on top of the soap then painting it on. Every time I see someone shaving in an old movie or t.v. show, BJ on M*A*S*H the other day and Steve McQueen in "Nevada Smith,, they're painting it on. I like and use all methods and get equally good results. I enjoy the steps in each method as much as the finally putting the lather on. As far as the exfoliating argument for face lathering, I'm pretty sure that takes place during the actual shave anyways.

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 08-27-2018, 05:57 AM
#57
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I also like to really work the lather into my beard.  I build my lather in a bowl and once the brush is fully loaded I then take a fair amount of time to work it into my beard.  Almost like a face lathering after the bowl lathering.  Once I feel like the lather has fully penetrated my beard, I then paint on a nice layer of lather over my entire face.  I do this for each of 3 passes plus touchup.  For the 2nd and subsequent passes, the face lathering is necessary to incorporate the water remaining on my face from the last rinse into the lather.  This has worked for me for about 2 1/2 years.

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 09-25-2018, 04:42 PM
#58
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I find bowl  lathering builds too much air into the lather vs. face lathering.
I've always found face lathering keeps the lather creamier and slicker.

I  swirl in circular motion (without pushing on the brush as that is definitely a no-no as far as breaking hairs) to build the lather,then paint once the brush starts giving up the lather.
Usually squeezing out the lather from the brush for the face paint

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 09-26-2018, 03:05 AM
#59
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(07-25-2018, 11:42 PM)Roy Wrote: Natural brushes can't be very delicate!  I bet the badger  or boar didn't be too careful with their hair!  They play rough!
Well, your shave brush doesn't grow a new hair when one falls out last time I checked.

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 09-26-2018, 05:45 AM
#60
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(07-25-2018, 08:17 AM)Mel S Meles Wrote:
(07-02-2018, 05:50 AM)Vlasta Wrote: I read in this article from 35 years ago in the NYT, says it can damage the brush. The advice came from a Simpsons expert. Here is the article and here is the excerpt.

https://www.nytimes.com/1983/01/07/style...brush.html

"But, says Stan Archer, the works manager of Simpson, a good shaving brush will last 15 to 20 years if cared for properly. It should always be rinsed thoroughly after use and all excess moisture shaken off. The most common fault among shavers is that they tend to lather up with a circular motion of the brush, Mr. Archer says. ''Nothing will spoil a good brush faster. You're twisting the hairs against themselves. You should always use straight up-and-down strokes - in the shaving bowl and on your face - and don't apply too much pressure.''

Simpson merged with Vulfix some years back.  I have here a Vulfix 2234S (Super Badger) brush that I bought about a decade after that 1983 article.  I used the brush daily, 365 days a year, for about a quarter century, and invariably I lathered on the puck with circular motions (though not pressing down) before applying the lather to my face with a mixture of swirling and painting motions.  As far as I know, the brush never lost a hair; I still have it, though I seldom use it these days because I “graduated” to a Semogue 2-band badger that has more backbone.  

My assessment, therefore, is that the important part of the advice is to avoid mashing the bristles, and that the advice not to swirl is relatively insignificant.

EXACTLY. Just because a guy is the Manager/Inventor of an artist paint brush company, doesn't mean he can paint like Rembrandt. It's his "Humble Opinion"

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