04-16-2018, 02:40 PM
#1
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Here's two I re-potted last week.

[Image: AqzBlyF.jpg]
This one I've been making for a little over 2 years.

[Image: 9ex6uHk.jpg][Image: FD44nnD.jpg]
this one, about 8 months.

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 04-16-2018, 02:56 PM
#2
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Cool. I love bonsai. I had about 10 trees I was growing as pre-bonsai, and over the years all but one have died. I guess I better start training the last one before it too dies. It’s a trident maple.

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 04-16-2018, 03:59 PM
#3
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Maples are great. I had a couple many years ago. I had an 18 year old Chinese Elm. It was so beautiful, tore me up when it died.
I'm just playing with these, no real loss if they die. Got a picture of yours?

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 04-16-2018, 04:58 PM
#4
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No picture right now. I’ll try to remember to take one tomorrow. Nothing special. Just a small tree in a pot. Funny because it’s about 20 yrs old but just looks like a sapling because I’ve always had it in a pot. No bonsai training on it though, so the limbs grow mostly vertical.

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 04-16-2018, 05:09 PM
#5
  • Sully
  • Super Moderator
  • Cedar Park, Texas
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I don't have any bonsai.  I've always been interested in learning more about them.  Those look great Zipper.

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 04-16-2018, 05:56 PM
#6
  • eengler
  • Administrator
  • South Dakota, USA
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Very Cool. I have had a few over the years but had a hard time keeping them going.

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 04-16-2018, 06:42 PM
#7
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Love em.  Coached football in Tokyo and got to watch some masters working .  Your number two really appeals to me and number one reminds me of the white bark pines high on a ridge above the home I grew up in.

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 04-17-2018, 06:49 AM
#8
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(04-16-2018, 06:42 PM)Lipripper60 Wrote: Love em.  Coached football in Tokyo and got to watch some masters working .  Your number two really appeals to me and number one reminds me of the white bark pines high on a ridge above the home I grew up in.

Thanks, I lived in Japan for three years myself. That's where I learned a little about Bonsai. Number one will change dramatically over the next three years. Only one branch will remain as it becomes a very twisted
trunk.

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 04-17-2018, 07:39 AM
#9
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I don’t practice bonsai yet, but I absolutely love it. Well done!

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 04-17-2018, 09:28 AM
#10
  • Barrylu
  • Senior Member
  • Portland OR
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I think this one is old. I took care of it for a few years and then got bored with it. I gave it to my wife and she dotes on it.
[Image: ewf7jNQ.jpg]

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 04-17-2018, 01:01 PM
#11
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(04-17-2018, 09:28 AM)Barrylu Wrote: I think this one is old. I took care of it for a few years and then got bored with it. I gave it to my wife and she dotes on it.
[Image: ewf7jNQ.jpg]
Nice. The thing I like about Bonsai, I can "garden" without the hot sweating on my knees toiling the soil.

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 04-18-2018, 11:41 AM
#12
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don't own any but surely appreciate the beauty.  I seem to love a lot of Japanese things lately.

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 04-20-2018, 05:57 PM
#13
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Here’s a picture of my Trident Maple pre-bonsai. Maybe I’ll get motivated to repot it and start training it this year.
About 20 years old and been in this pot for a few years, so I’m guessing it has a taproot growing through the bottom.

[Image: 8DPDqpG_d.jpg?maxwidth=640&shape=thumb&fidelity=medium]

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 04-21-2018, 03:37 PM
#14
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(04-20-2018, 05:57 PM)vanacres Wrote: Here’s a picture of my Trident Maple pre-bonsai. Maybe I’ll get motivated to repot it and start training it this year.
About 20 years old and been in this pot for a few years, so I’m guessing it has a taproot growing through the bottom.

[Image: 8DPDqpG_d.jpg?maxwidth=640&shape=thumb&fidelity=medium]

I think you should trim a third off the top and a third of the root ball. Repot, place in a shady spot for 2+weeks, next year same thing until you get it down. Maybe in 3-4 years put it in a bonsai pot
Withhold water for a day or two before you trim, you want the roots to be pliable b/4 trimming and repotting, if the roots are gorged with water, they might break.
Good luck, it can be a really nice tree with some work.

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 04-21-2018, 05:04 PM
#15
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(04-21-2018, 03:37 PM)zipper Wrote: I think you should trim a third off the top and a third of the root ball. Repot, place in a shady spot for 2+weeks, next year same thing until you get it down. Maybe in 3-4 years put it in a bonsai pot
Withhold water for a day or two before you trim, you want the roots to be pliable b/4 trimming and repotting, if the roots are gorged with water, they might break.
Good luck, it can be a really nice tree with some work.

I think you’re right. That’s actually easy enough to do, so no reason for me not to do it. Thanks for the motivation.

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 06-21-2018, 06:25 AM
#16
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I'm not into suppressing a tree's growth potential for the sake of have a piece of nature indoors. If I want to see nature I will go outside.

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 06-21-2018, 10:08 AM
#17
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(06-21-2018, 06:25 AM)anomaly1985 Wrote: I'm not into suppressing a tree's growth potential for the sake of have a piece of nature indoors. If I want to see nature I will go outside.
Silly boy...... it's a tree, they live outside. Smile  On my back porch  Cool

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 06-21-2018, 01:58 PM
#18
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
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I too love Bonsai, but don’t practice it. I also like Ikebana. My late mother was deeply into Bonsai and Ikebana. I don’t know which school of Ikebana she followed, but she was a master of the art. I find both very peaceful as I do Japanese music.

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 06-21-2018, 02:06 PM
#19
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(06-21-2018, 01:58 PM)Rufus Wrote: I too love Bonsai, but don’t practice it.  I also like Ikebana.  My late mother was deeply into Bonsai and Ikebana.  I don’t know which school of Ikebana she followed, but she was a master of the art.  I find both very peaceful as I do Japanese music.

Thumbsup

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 06-21-2018, 02:06 PM
#20
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zipper:  

Love the krumholtz effect your making.  

What species lends itself to this?  Seems like North American cedars and cypress (not true cedars from the old world) or maybe mountain hemlock with its short leaves.  Any book you suggest to start out with or just internet...

Very cool...

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