06-20-2018, 05:32 AM
#21
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(06-14-2018, 04:57 PM)Shavemd Wrote: Enjoy the shave! Love mine. For me a shallow angle and light touch = great shave

Exactly my thoughts as well.  No pressure; let the razor do its job.

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 06-20-2018, 07:23 AM
#22
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Good news - the Rx is with UK Customs, waiting for me to pay the import duties, which I will do once they tell me how much I owe!!

That being said, your comments about the right blade are really interesting. I think going in with a Proline may be optimistic, and getting the range and hang of it with a Kai Pink may be a better/safer route.

Sent from my G8141 using Tapatalk

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 06-21-2018, 02:52 PM
#23
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Last Monday I received the  Rx I bought on the the BST forum from eengler. Now that I've had a whopping three shaves with it, I'm going to share some initial impressions.

The machining and finish are first rate, the head design is extremely clever.  The razor looks great, and feels wonderful in the hand. It is surprisingly heavy, perhaps because I normally favor titanium handles, and the Rx's steel handle is noticably heavier. But it is a good heavy.  It reminds my of the Toyota Celica my wife had it the mid-eighties (can't remember the model year), the feel is both solid and agile at the same time.

For my inaugural shaves I decided to go with a Kai Captain mild blade. From what I've read, the Rx is said lean aggressive , so I went with what I hoped would be the mildest blade I had on hand. The alternatives were a Schick Proline or a Feather Pro.   I'll get around to them in due time.

Shave 1: I chose WSP Rustic Gaelic Tweed for the lather. An odd choice in that I don't have much experience with this soap. I have a 1oz sample I picked up at last year's shave meetup in Raleigh. I had only used it once before, the day before the Rx's maiden voyage.  I shaved very cautiously, very light pressure, slow and easy as I searched for the angle.  At one point I bungled badly and poked myself in the cheek with the corner of the Rx.  I held my breath, waiting for the blood, but none came. TheRx head design had me covered: the corners of the blade are well guarded. Very nice. The first shave was not bad at all. Three passes, near bbs, with two pinpoint weepers that I wrote off to inexperience with the razor. No irritation. BTW, the Gaelic Tweed has been a pleasant surprise: easy to lather, slick, I love the scent, skin felt great afterwards. I want to try the tallow version.

Shave 2:  I switched the soap to Cade Rich Cream. Good idea? Maybe not. The scientist in me says to control the variables during an investigation.  I tell him that this not science, that this is life, art, pleasure, and that I switch soaps because I want to, new razor or not.  I was less tentative this time, and was rewarded with an even better shave. Three passes, going for bbs. That's what I do pretty much every day; it does not seem to bother my skin.  Great shave, no blood, no irritation, much face stroking during the drive to work.

Shave 3: I busted out the B&M Fougere Gothique, which I just adore and so use sparingly.  The outcome was another great shave. No irritation or blood, if anything even closer than the day before.  The Rx is a seriously effictive hair removing machine.  Note to self: if B&M ever does a re-release of FG, stock up.

Impressions after three shaves: this razor is very much a keeper.  I normally switch razors about weekly, but I plan to stick with the Rx for at least a month, to help build some muscle memory.  I expect that the Rx and I will soon be inseparable friends.

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 06-21-2018, 04:24 PM
#24
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Nice review. I keep asking this: what is your preferred angle with the Rx?

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 06-21-2018, 05:19 PM
#25
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(06-21-2018, 04:24 PM)lloydrm Wrote: Nice review. I keep asking this: what is your preferred angle with the Rx?

Hmm, I may be the wrong guy to answer, given that I'm new to the Rx, but what the heck.  The picture below has the Rx on the top edge of a book, think of it as the cheek.  That is my best approximation to the angle I'm using. I used a book because I don't have enough hands, eyeballs, or photo skills to hold the simultaneously hold phone/camera, the razor, and succesfully set up the shot  in a mirror.

I think a lot of us have to overcome years of cart shaving, where the correct angle has the handle more parallel to the face.  Raising the handle, as in the picture, puts the blade more parallel to the face. Take it with a grain of salt.


[Image: qIfOqiK.jpg?1]

My approch to finding a decent angle was to start with the flat part of the head flat against my skin. You can't shave in that position because the the blade does not even touch your skin. From there I brought the handle down, bringing the blade edge closer to the skin.  The idea is to experiment, erring to the side of handle too high, very light pressure at all times.   As you lower the handle, you eventually reach the point where a stroke will shave hair.  Then it is a matter of small angular adjustments to find your comfort zone.  Start practice on the flattest part of the cheek, go with the grain.  Most of trick is learning to maintain the angle as you move over the more curved parts of the face, say the tip of the chin, or the ridge of the jawbone.  That is why I start the search on the flattest part of the face.

Alternatively (I jest) do exactly the opposite.  Start with the handle very near the skin, so that the blade is nearly perpendicular to the skin.  In that position it will not shave very well if at all, but any lateral motion will slice you nicely. Now raise the handle slowly as you stroke, and with any luck the blade will bite you good.  My point is that when the blade is too flat (parallel to skin) it will miss the skin altogether.  When the blade is at a high angle (near perpendicular) it can act like a meat shovel, and dig right in.  At least that is my take on it.

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 06-21-2018, 06:11 PM
#26
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Thanks. I ask because I think this razor is fantastic 99% of the time, but I get a cut of two every now and then that kind of ruins perfection.
I am still looking for the perfect angle for this one. I guess I should use it for a few days on a row. So many should's in life ...

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 06-21-2018, 07:17 PM
#27
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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(06-21-2018, 05:19 PM)nostromo Wrote:
(06-21-2018, 04:24 PM)lloydrm Wrote: Nice review. I keep asking this: what is your preferred angle with the Rx?

Hmm, I may be the wrong guy to answer, given that I'm new to the Rx, but what the heck.  The picture below has the Rx on the top edge of a book, think of it as the cheek.  That is my best approximation to the angle I'm using. I used a book because I don't have enough hands, eyeballs, or photo skills to hold the simultaneously hold phone/camera, the razor, and succesfully set up the shot  in a mirror.

I think a lot of us have to overcome years of cart shaving, where the correct angle has the handle more parallel to the face.  Raising the handle, as in the picture, puts the blade more parallel to the face. Take it with a grain of salt.


[Image: qIfOqiK.jpg?1]

My approch to finding a decent angle was to start with the flat part of the head flat against my skin. You can't shave in that position because the the blade does not even touch your skin. From there I brought the handle down, bringing the blade edge closer to the skin.  The idea is to experiment, erring to the side of handle too high, very light pressure at all times.   As you lower the handle, you eventually reach the point where a stroke will shave hair.  Then it is a matter of small angular adjustments to find your comfort zone.  Start practice on the flattest part of the cheek, go with the grain.  Most of trick is learning to maintain the angle as you move over the more curved parts of the face, say the tip of the chin, or the ridge of the jawbone.  That is why I start the search on the flattest part of the face.

Alternatively (I jest) do exactly the opposite.  Start with the handle very near the skin, so that the blade is nearly perpendicular to the skin.  In that position it will not shave very well if at all, but any lateral motion will slice you nicely. Now raise the handle slowly as you stroke, and with any luck the blade will bite you good.  My point is that when the blade is too flat (parallel to skin) it will miss the skin altogether.  When the blade is at a high angle (near perpendicular) it can act like a meat shovel, and dig right in.  At least that is my take on it.
Great Post! This is the best illustration that I have seen yet.

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 Yesterday, 11:37 AM
#28
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I have been advised by my office that the Royal Mail import card is now on my desk, ready for my return on Monday. All the information on angles and blades that has been posted by you all in the interim has been invaluable, and I hope my next post here will be a review of the Rx after my first few rounds with it.

See y'all soon!

Sent from my G8141 using Tapatalk

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