06-07-2018, 06:36 PM
#1
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Always wanted to be more proficient in welding,  Recently picked up a entry level TIG welder.  Always felt comfortable with gas, hate MIG.  Never figured out puddle management on MIG so TIG seemed a reasonable direction.  Slow, deliberate, versatile.  Who knows I might need to make a titanium mountain bike someday...

Let's face it, self teaching is nothing more than reinventing the wheel.  It's dumb.  I could spend a couple hundred bucks on a local college course in the evenings and be light years ahead.  But dang, this long slow process is really interesting and therapeutic.  Minor successes stick in the old noggin pretty good and feel darn good when you get them.  

Anyone else find a long lost want they've picked up lately for self teaching?  Making music, wood working, painting, pottery...?

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 06-07-2018, 09:37 PM
#2
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I plan to buy a lathe this summer - disguised as a birthday present to myself - to teach myself wood turning... I been playing around with an old drill mounted horisontally, but that's not really good enough to learn much more than I already know.

It may be reinventing the wheel, but sometimes there is no local classes and sometimes the journey is the destination Wink

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 06-08-2018, 05:47 AM
#3
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Nothing wrong with this thinking. I know I learn better thru hands on training, best by mistakes. Someone does it first, then teaches others.
That's all you guys are doing...going first, into your unknown. Good luck on your journey... Thumbsup

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 06-08-2018, 06:03 AM
#4
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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I will try to make this long story as short as possible.  Since I was a kid I have been interested in firearms and what makes them work.  I always enjoyed helping my Dad clean and oil his collection of guns and from time to time I would tear them down to see how they worked.  I have always done my own repairs on my personal firearms but always wanted to do more.  After retirement in 2005 I started looking into all the different gunsmith schools, but I did not want to know everything about ever gun made.  So, over the past five years I have gone to armorers school at GLOCK, SIG, and Remington.

I now have a part time job (one or two days a week) maintaining the GLOCK pistols and Remington 870 shotguns for our local police department.  It has been very rewarding.  It does not pay much, but I get to shoot for free anytime I want to go to the police firing range, and that is at least once a week, sometimes more.

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 06-08-2018, 06:06 AM
#5
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I have pretty much self taught myself woodworking over the years.  Read books, watched videos, and made a lot of mistakes.  They say the sign of a true craftsman is being able to hide those mistakes.  People look at my projects and tell me how good they look and I am standing there looking at all of the flaws.  We are our own harshest critic but I learn from my mistakes and use that to improve on the next project.

I have taken welding and machining classes at the local trade school in the evening but I didn't want to invest in the high cost of equipment until I found out if I liked it or even had any aptitude for it.  I am currently taking a blacksmithing course which a lot of people self teach themselves but I again I didn't want to buy equipment until I knew if I liked it or not.  I now want to get an anvil and forge and start making stuff to use on my woodworking projects or around the house which at that point will be more trial and error.

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 06-08-2018, 06:11 AM
#6
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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Mike, blacksmithing always interested me.  I love watching the TV series, Forged In Fire.

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 06-08-2018, 06:26 AM
#7
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As we approach (or achieve) retirement age, it's particularly important to have hobbies.  Think of the expense as a contribution to your well being.

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 06-08-2018, 06:33 AM
#8
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(06-08-2018, 06:11 AM)Johnny Wrote: Mike, blacksmithing always interested me.  I love watching the TV series, Forged In Fire.

Actually I kind of ended up taking blacksmithing as a back-up to the TIG welding class I had signed up for and then was cancelled before it started.  I give Oldschool a lot of credit for taking up TIG on his own.

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 06-08-2018, 09:58 AM
#9
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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(06-08-2018, 06:03 AM)Johnny Wrote: I will try to make this long story as short as possible.  Since I was a kid I have been interested in firearms and what makes them work.  I always enjoyed helping my Dad clean and oil his collection of guns and from time to time I would tear them down to see how they worked.  I have always done my own repairs on my personal firearms but always wanted to do more.  After retirement in 2005 I started looking into all the different gunsmith schools, but I did not want to know everything about ever gun made.  So, over the past five years I have gone to armorers school at GLOCK, SIG, and Remington.

I now have a part time job (one or two days a week) maintaining the GLOCK pistols and Remington 870 shotguns for our local police department.  It has been very rewarding.  It does not pay much, but I get to shoot for free anytime I want to go to the police firing range, and that is at least once a week, sometimes more.

Johnny, do you shoot standing or prone? I'd think it would help you to achieve greater stability in a prone position.

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 06-08-2018, 10:10 AM
#10
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(06-08-2018, 06:03 AM)Johnny Wrote: I will try to make this long story as short as possible.  Since I was a kid I have been interested in firearms and what makes them work.  I always enjoyed helping my Dad clean and oil his collection of guns and from time to time I would tear them down to see how they worked.  I have always done my own repairs on my personal firearms but always wanted to do more.  After retirement in 2005 I started looking into all the different gunsmith schools, but I did not want to know everything about ever gun made.  So, over the past five years I have gone to armorers school at GLOCK, SIG, and Remington.

I now have a part time job (one or two days a week) maintaining the GLOCK pistols and Remington 870 shotguns for our local police department.  It has been very rewarding.  It does not pay much, but I get to shoot for free anytime I want to go to the police firing range, and that is at least once a week, sometimes more.

That's a nice gig Johnny!

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 06-08-2018, 11:13 AM
#11
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(06-08-2018, 10:10 AM)TheLegalRazor Wrote:
(06-08-2018, 06:03 AM)Johnny Wrote: I will try to make this long story as short as possible.  Since I was a kid I have been interested in firearms and what makes them work.  I always enjoyed helping my Dad clean and oil his collection of guns and from time to time I would tear them down to see how they worked.  I have always done my own repairs on my personal firearms but always wanted to do more.  After retirement in 2005 I started looking into all the different gunsmith schools, but I did not want to know everything about ever gun made.  So, over the past five years I have gone to armorers school at GLOCK, SIG, and Remington.

I now have a part time job (one or two days a week) maintaining the GLOCK pistols and Remington 870 shotguns for our local police department.  It has been very rewarding.  It does not pay much, but I get to shoot for free anytime I want to go to the police firing range, and that is at least once a week, sometimes more.

That's a nice gig Johnny!

Agreed - sounds like a really neat job!  Now if I could convince my local PD to hire me!

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 06-08-2018, 03:10 PM
#12
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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To answer two questions.  I shoot from a standing position.  I'm old enough that if I got in a prone position, it would take two people to get me up. Smile   As for as the job, I had to take the armorers school from the manufactures before I would work for the PD.

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 06-09-2018, 03:35 PM
#13
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I hear that about retiring, but having something to do has never been a problem.  My brothers and I have a gene or curse from Dad that makes us dink around with anything and everything.

Hopefully 4 years will retire.  '96 Nissan Hardbody will end up being rebuilt, rewired and slammed with a Pathfinder IRS and disc brake rear end. The '65 Sunroof Beetle will have a 88mm x 82mm stroker and I am going to dare to take on the transmission build too.  Thought about restoring the bug, but I've been wrenching on them since I was 7.  If it was a Cabriolet probably.  Oh, already converted it to IRS rear end from the original swing axle.  One of the reasons for learning TIG is for the cars, at least I'm planning ahead for a change.  This along with the vineyard and wine making chores, I have stock to build a matching pair of carved top Mandola's, one in oval hole and another in f hole, a pile of linotype for casting and on and on...

Weird I know...

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 06-10-2018, 10:50 AM
#14
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Hobbies expand to fill available time, or so I'm informed by reliable sources Tongue

I repeatedly asked my grandfather - a master "kleinsmed" (a blacksmith specialising in finer work, such as locks, hinges, mechanisms and decorative works) - to teach me the basics when I was younger but his take on that was that unless I was willing to sign on as an apprentice and do it full time, he didn't have the time to teach. While I did consider picking it up a few years ago and learn the basics by myself, I don't think the neighbours would be too pleased by constant hammering and sparks flying in the common areas Tongue

That, and since metal work was part of what I did for a living back then, I didn't want to have my job as a hobby... they ought to be different enough that doing your hobby should allow you to relax.

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 06-20-2018, 11:42 AM
#15
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Back in '79 I went to a handcraft show in San Diego and a "hippy guy" had some great handmade knives with fantastic 
acid etched blades. He also was selling a book he wrote with about a dozen of his commune partners. Bought the book.
made a couple dozen knives, this is the last one I made. Circa 1984.
Stag Handles, German silver bolsters, case and leather work I did too.
[Image: SExxOVL.jpg]
[Image: HB4OIsl.jpg]
[Image: E1hlsce.jpg]

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 06-20-2018, 12:40 PM
#16
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Very nice and impressive work zipper.

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 06-20-2018, 12:52 PM
#17
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(06-20-2018, 12:40 PM)TheLegalRazor Wrote: Very nice and impressive work zipper.

Thanks.

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 06-20-2018, 01:04 PM
#18
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It's called DIY gents. I think do it yourself (DIY) is genetic and not driven out of us early on as it was in other folks during development.

I have a problem that was informally diagnosed early on in my career as having to know everything about as much as possible. On a personal note and more on topic, that meant stick welding and inert gas welding. But since I live in rural USA that just follows... we do for ourselves or we can't live here.

Did I self teach? Well, no. I went on line, asked questions of experienced certified co-workers, and bought books. What is education if not all of those elements? Free education doesn't indicate a lesser value than "store bought" from an learning institution. I learned to weld from some of the very best hands-on welders.

That's the history of my life and learning in a nut shell. I have an innate curiosity coupled with hands on ability. Of course other factors are also in play.

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 06-30-2018, 11:32 AM
#19
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Self-learning... LOL

Amplified Blues Harmonica

[Image: 747263e7de7b0d1559c610733e413c84.jpg][Image: 627b38a4d959f4618d865679a8edfff1.jpg][Image: ae084d7a9bd1dc5389554e5a8d69c62a.jpg]

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 06-30-2018, 12:09 PM
#20
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(06-07-2018, 09:37 PM)WegianWarrior Wrote: I plan to buy a lathe this summer - disguised as a birthday present to myself - to teach myself wood turning... I been playing around with an old drill mounted horisontally, but that's not really good enough to learn much more than I already know.

It may be reinventing the wheel, but sometimes there is no local classes and sometimes the journey is the destination Wink

Update: The lathe will be delivered on the 2nd. The carbide cutters will take a couple of weeks more, but I got some cheap gouges and scrapers in a drawer... so I'll try to make some chips Tongue

I expect a steep learning curve Biggrin

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