09-05-2012, 02:35 PM
#1
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OK finally stepping up from my drugstore boar brush that's getting ratty looking but works well to a Semogue 830

I like boar,didn't want a wood handle and figure it should be a good fit for me.

I know a lot of you have several brushes,as far as maintenance am I losing anything using the same brush every day ?

It's doesn't have a wood handle,as long as I rinse it out well and shake out excess water do I really need to hang it up in a stand with the brush side pointed down ?

What kind of longevity can I expect if I'm using it as my go to daily brush ?

Any stupid easy to make mistakes that can ruin a nice brush ?

Thanks !

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 09-05-2012, 02:40 PM
#2
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There's no advantage to using a brush stand other than the bloom is lessened. IMO.

While you can use the same badger brush everyday and the brush should dry out completely, I'm under the impression that this is not true with boar. Thus, you should alternate boar brushes.

You are losing out all the experiences of shaving with all the different brushes. Worth the price of admission? I think so.

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 09-05-2012, 03:04 PM
#3
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A vast majority of the generations before us who shaved at home had one brush that was commonly boar bristle. From a minimalistic standpoint, I think what you are doing is fine. To enhance the brush's ability to make lather and to increase longevity, you can clean the brush once or twice a year (glycerin soap and white vinegar is what I prefer).

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 09-05-2012, 04:27 PM
#4
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(09-05-2012, 02:40 PM)asharperrazor Wrote: There's no advantage to using a brush stand other than the bloom is lessened. IMO.

While you can use the same badger brush everyday and the brush should dry out completely, I'm under the impression that this is not true with boar. Thus, you should alternate boar brushes.

You are losing out all the experiences of shaving with all the different brushes. Worth the price of admission? I think so.

Small steps,I can perceive the differences between and advantages of various razors,it will be interesting for me to try what should be a better brush and begin to appreciate the subtleties and see where that leads.
Thanks...

(09-05-2012, 03:04 PM)kentclark Wrote: A vast majority of the generations before us who shaved at home had one brush that was commonly boar bristle. From a minimalistic standpoint, I think what you are doing is fine. To enhance the brush's ability to make lather and to increase longevity, you can clean the brush once or twice a year (glycerin soap and white vinegar is what I prefer).

Some good perspective and I especially appreciate the cleaning advice.
Thanks....

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 09-05-2012, 05:44 PM
#5
  • freddy
  • Senior Member
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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As long as the brush can dry out completely between uses, you should be fine.

I have most of my brushes on stands but I also have a few sitting on their bases. Either way seems to work so don't worry too much about that.

I have the Semogue 830 and it is a super brush. The handle fits nicely in the hand. Short of constantly smushing it down hard into your soap/cream and your face, it should offer a long life of faithful service.

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 09-05-2012, 06:00 PM
#6
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(09-05-2012, 03:04 PM)kentclark Wrote: A vast majority of the generations before us who shaved at home had one brush that was commonly boar bristle. From a minimalistic standpoint, I think what you are doing is fine. To enhance the brush's ability to make lather and to increase longevity, you can clean the brush once or twice a year (glycerin soap and white vinegar is what I prefer).

Not sure how true that is. Razors were extremely expensive to own and maintain. It would have been cheaper to go to the barber once a week for church. Those who could afford a razor could afford badger most likely. Also, I'm fairly certain shaving every day is a fairly modern practice.

Not a historian though.

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 09-05-2012, 06:06 PM
#7
  • oscar11
  • Senior Member
  • North Dakota
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I've had cheap drug store boars that have lasted for years. Honestly, I've been wet shaving for over 40 years, I doubt I've had more than 3 in that time period. Then I discovered internet shaving forums and everything changed. Now I want (need) a brush for every full moon cycle.

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 09-05-2012, 06:54 PM
#8
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(09-05-2012, 06:00 PM)asharperrazor Wrote:
(09-05-2012, 03:04 PM)kentclark Wrote: A vast majority of the generations before us who shaved at home had one brush that was commonly boar bristle. From a minimalistic standpoint, I think what you are doing is fine. To enhance the brush's ability to make lather and to increase longevity, you can clean the brush once or twice a year (glycerin soap and white vinegar is what I prefer).

Not sure how true that is. Razors were extremely expensive to own and maintain. It would have been cheaper to go to the barber once a week for church. Those who could afford a razor could afford badger most likely. Also, I'm fairly certain shaving every day is a fairly modern practice.

Not a historian though.

Thank you, Lee, I should clarify: in the DE era. I agree with what you said prior to Gillette's DE coming on the scene early in the 1900's.

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 09-05-2012, 06:57 PM
#9
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(09-05-2012, 06:54 PM)kentclark Wrote:
(09-05-2012, 06:00 PM)asharperrazor Wrote:
(09-05-2012, 03:04 PM)kentclark Wrote: A vast majority of the generations before us who shaved at home had one brush that was commonly boar bristle. From a minimalistic standpoint, I think what you are doing is fine. To enhance the brush's ability to make lather and to increase longevity, you can clean the brush once or twice a year (glycerin soap and white vinegar is what I prefer).

Not sure how true that is. Razors were extremely expensive to own and maintain. It would have been cheaper to go to the barber once a week for church. Those who could afford a razor could afford badger most likely. Also, I'm fairly certain shaving every day is a fairly modern practice.

Not a historian though.

Thank you, Lee, I should clarify: in the DE era. I agree with what you said prior to Gillette's DE coming on the scene early in the 1900's.

In that case, I defer to the historians as that is not my area of knowledge.

Although I don't understand why people wouldn't have two boar brushes? The western world was pretty wealthy after recovering from the depression and could easily afford a couple of boar brushes. Surely they were a fraction of the cost of the razor.

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 09-05-2012, 07:32 PM
#10
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The 830 is a great brush. Let it dry properly and it should be fine.

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 09-05-2012, 07:35 PM
#11
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My understanding is that way back then males only shaved once a week even if they did own a razor. So any brush had plenty of time to dry off. Too, horse hair brushes were popular because they were so inexpensive. They fell out favor when a load of brushes with anthrax were imported from Turkey. Folks tend not to buy something if it kills them. Not everyone had easy access to a barber, only city folks did, so it was do it yourself or do without. Country folk had horse and horse travel tends to make going into town a monthly operation. If you've ever traveled by horse wagon (I have when exercising work horses) even just a 5 mile trip becomes an all day event. They plod along steadily, but it's not much faster than a walking pace for a human.

We shave daily today largely because of societal mores and for enjoyment, but we really only need to shave weekly at best. But let's not forget that if the hair wasn't removed it bacame a hygiene problem. We're the only animal on the planet that has something as disgusting as hair hanging over our feeding hole. Don't cut it and it needs to be held out of the way of feeding, or we need to keep pulling it out of our throat after every swallow. Can you imagine how disgusting it would have gotten after consuming fatty grilled Bison hump while squatting around the fire? Of course since the only readily available salt for the meat would have been from the Bisons urine, maybe it would never have been noticed. Yuck! No salt for me thanks!

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 09-05-2012, 08:37 PM
#12
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(09-05-2012, 05:44 PM)freddy Wrote: As long as the brush can dry out completely between uses, you should be fine.

I have most of my brushes on stands but I also have a few sitting on their bases. Either way seems to work so don't worry too much about that.

I have the Semogue 830 and it is a super brush. The handle fits nicely in the hand. Short of constantly smushing it down hard into your soap/cream and your face, it should offer a long life of faithful service.

I'll have to be sure to ease up a bit when swirling around the soap and on my face,been getting better,but I come close to pressing too hard.

(09-05-2012, 06:06 PM)oscar11 Wrote: I've had cheap drug store boars that have lasted for years. Honestly, I've been wet shaving for over 40 years, I doubt I've had more than 3 in that time period. Then I discovered internet shaving forums and everything changed. Now I want (need) a brush for every full moon cycle.

Might be more than the forums to blame,during full moon's when the werewolf transformation happens,that's a lot to shave Biggrin

Great perspective,thanks for that... My Granfather was an old time Pharmacist who owned his on Drugstore before the big chains took over most family run places.I was too small to shave back then,I'm sure he must have sold shave brushes,now I'm wondering what they had for sale....

(09-05-2012, 07:32 PM)celestino Wrote: The 830 is a great brush. Let it dry properly and it should be fine.

Thanks,it's good to hear...I didn't ask around for suggestions from anyone,there's so much good information around the forums I did a few searches and seem to have selected a bush that should work well.

(09-05-2012, 07:35 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: My understanding is that way back then males only shaved once a week even if they did own a razor. So any brush had plenty of time to dry off. Too, horse hair brushes were popular because they were so inexpensive. They fell out favor when a load of brushes with anthrax were imported from Turkey. Folks tend not to buy something if it kills them. Not everyone had easy access to a barber, only city folks did, so it was do it yourself or do without. Country folk had horse and horse travel tends to make going into town a monthly operation. If you've ever traveled by horse wagon (I have when exercising work horses) even just a 5 mile trip becomes an all day event. They plod along steadily, but it's not much faster than a walking pace for a human.

We shave daily today largely because of societal mores and for enjoyment, but we really only need to shave weekly at best. But let's not forget that if the hair wasn't removed it bacame a hygiene problem. We're the only animal on the planet that has something as disgusting as hair hanging over our feeding hole. Don't cut it and it needs to be held out of the way of feeding, or we need to keep pulling it out of our throat after every swallow. Can you imagine how disgusting it would have gotten after consuming fatty grilled Bison hump while squatting around the fire? Of course since the only readily available salt for the meat would have been from the Bisons urine, maybe it would never have been noticed. Yuck! No salt for me thanks!

That's only a consideration where bison consumption as a percentage of general dietary habits is relatively low.

This discussion wouldn't be complete without mentioning the evolutionary ramifications of buffalo consumption with regard to Native Americans whose hunting patterns and resultant dietary choices ensured that they evolved as a race with little to no facial hair.

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