07-04-2018, 05:50 PM
#1
  • Ambrose
  • Ex-Lurker
  • Harlingen, Texas
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Anyone else just love the rich strong espresso like brew of a moka pot

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 07-04-2018, 06:23 PM
#2
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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(07-04-2018, 05:50 PM)Ambrose Wrote: Anyone else just love the rich strong espresso like brew of a moka pot

I have never experienced coffee from a moka pot but, it sounds like I need to change that.

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 07-04-2018, 08:10 PM
#3
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I love my Bialetti Moka Pot Wink Similar to an espresso, but with no crema... I think I need to make a cup later today Tongue

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 07-04-2018, 09:45 PM
#4
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(07-04-2018, 05:50 PM)Ambrose Wrote: Anyone else just love the rich strong espresso like brew of a moka pot

Although we enjoyed moka pot coffee frequently in the accommodations where we elected to lodge when we visited Tuscany or Umbria, we did not venture to brew by that method at home for one simple reason:  almost all of the moka pots that are readily available are aluminum or aluminum alloy in construction, and our energy source for brewing is an induction cooktop.  Aluminum cookware does not perform well on an induction hob.  Then VeV Vigano, closely followed by GAT, introduced induction compatible moka pots to commerce, and we were instant converts.  Although our daily coffee remains a brew from a Hario vacuum pot, we usually make two potfuls/* using a GAT Carmen 6-tasse once or twice a week, enough for the two of us, for a change of pace and an entirely different taste than we get from our vac pot.  Our French press has been gathering dust since the GAT Carmen came into our home, and undoubtedly we shall give the French press to charity in the next donation box that we assemble.  We really like the GAT Carmen.  

/* The difficulty with brewing two pots of moka pot coffee in quick succession is the disassembly of the moka pot after brewing the first batch.  The lower chamber remains VERY hot for a long time after the coffee has brewed.  The new generation of heat resistant, insulated, silicone-lined aramid fiber gloves (marketed under the Yokamira brand, but there are many simiilar) that can withstand temperatures up to 932°F/500°C makes living with a moka pot ever so much easier, allowing one to produce several potsful of excellent coffee within a very few minutes of each other.

Incidentally, we have found that the pre-ground Lavazza Kilimanjaro varietal coffee is an excellent match for moka pot brewing.

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 07-05-2018, 03:13 AM
#5
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
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I love my Bialetti Moka Pot coffee. I have a large pot which makes about 16 oz of coffee at a time. My favourite coffee is Starbucks’ Komodo Dragon. I find the coffee brewed in the Moka Pot is infinitely superior to that brewed by a French Press, pour over, etc.

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 07-05-2018, 04:04 AM
#6
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I have three sizes of Bialetti pots:  3 cup (small), 6 cup (standard) and 12 cup (huge).  I find I almost never use the 12 cup size.  

The 3 cup is perfect for making 1 large or 2 small cups of espresso.  I use 15 grams of Illy dark roast espresso (finely ground) in the basket, lightly tamped.

But the 6 cup size is the one I use most.  Again, I use 15 grams of freshly ground (fine) Illy dark roast, lightly tamped.  15 grams doesn't fill the basket, so what comes out is about 10 oz. of very strong Americano.  If the basket is filled (about 20 grams), the 6 cup pot produces about 4 really nice cups of espresso.  But as Hans points out, without the crema.

I've tried various Italian and Greek brands of commercially-available coffee (Lavazza, Bravo, Loumidis), and frankly I think those companies have been getting away with producing inferior product for years.  Illy (based in Trieste) is the only Mediterranean commercial brand I've found that consistently produces permium-quality beans, albeit at a high price point.

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 07-05-2018, 01:38 PM
#7
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(07-05-2018, 04:04 AM)BrickHud Wrote: I've tried various Italian and Greek brands of commercially-available coffee (Lavazza, Bravo, Loumidis), and frankly I think those companies have been getting away with producing inferior product for years.  Illy (based in Trieste) is the only Mediterranean commercial brand I've found that consistently produces permium-quality beans, albeit at a high price point.

It probably goes without saying — but I’ll say it anyway — that all those brands (including Illy) have several different offerings (flavors, if you will), and within a brand some are much “better” (depending upon subjective criteria that vary from individual to individual) than others.  Yr obdnt srvnt has been unimpressed with Lavazza’s signature premium blend, Qualità Oro, which is one of Lavazza’s few Arabica blends (most Lavazza coffees are sourced from Central and South America, and some — many? — comprise Robusta beans); but I have been very pleasantly surprised by Lavazza’s Kilimanjaro offering, which comprises only high-altitude-grown Arabica beans sourced from a rather small geographic area near the mountain for which it is named.

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 07-08-2018, 03:01 PM
#8
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(07-04-2018, 09:45 PM)Mel S Meles Wrote:
(07-04-2018, 05:50 PM)Ambrose Wrote: Anyone else just love the rich strong espresso like brew of a moka pot

Although we enjoyed moka pot coffee frequently in the accommodations where we elected to lodge when we visited Tuscany or Umbria, we did not venture to brew by that method at home for one simple reason:  almost all of the moka pots that are readily available are aluminum or aluminum alloy in construction, and our energy source for brewing is an induction cooktop.  Aluminum cookware does not perform well on an induction hob.  Then VeV Vigano, closely followed by GAT, introduced induction compatible moka pots to commerce, and we were instant converts.  Although our daily coffee remains a brew from a Hario vacuum pot, we usually make two potfuls/* using a GAT Carmen 6-tasse once or twice a week, enough for the two of us, for a change of pace and an entirely different taste than we get from our vac pot.  Our French press has been gathering dust since the GAT Carmen came into our home, and undoubtedly we shall give the French press to charity in the next donation box that we assemble.  We really like the GAT Carmen.  

/* The difficulty with brewing two pots of moka pot coffee in quick succession is the disassembly of the moka pot after brewing the first batch.  The lower chamber remains VERY hot for a long time after the coffee has brewed.  The new generation of heat resistant, insulated, silicone-lined aramid fiber gloves (marketed under the Yokamira brand, but there are many simiilar) that can withstand temperatures up to 932°F/500°C makes living with a moka pot ever so much easier, allowing one to produce several potsful of excellent coffee within a very few minutes of each other.

Incidentally, we have found that the pre-ground Lavazza Kilimanjaro varietal coffee is an excellent match for moka pot brewing.
Bialetti makes a stainless one

https://www.bialetti.com/coffee/stovetop...3rmg2ckbh1

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 07-08-2018, 03:02 PM
#9
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I use a brikka which has a pressure valve on the top  so it makes a crema.  It makes VERY good espresso, however you need Italian style beans.  I just rinse it out with cold water and the outside a bit so I can unscrew and clean it quickly.

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