08-16-2018, 03:12 PM
#1
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Gents,

I have been with the same Italian girl since freshman year of college, and was lucky enough to have her become my bride!  We will welcome our sixth baby mid-september.

I certainly married up, because I am a bit of a knuckle dragger!

Marrying into an Italian family has been interesting since I am an complete mutt (mostly Norwegian I am told)!

At any rate one of THE meals is steak and homemade fettuccine alfredo with wine!  This dinner is also some what special to me because one of my best pals would frequently have to do a bunch of little deployments to various places, and each time he would come home I would ask Jena to make this meal for him!


So what a treat to have it this week...home made fettuccine, beautifully marbled ribeye steaks, and some nice Malbec wine!

Enjoy!

Vr

Matt

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 08-16-2018, 03:14 PM
#2
  • Garb
  • Active Member
  • Oregon
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sounds delicious. Congratulations on your beautiful family as well.

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 08-16-2018, 03:16 PM
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 08-16-2018, 03:29 PM
#4
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(08-16-2018, 03:14 PM)Garb Wrote: sounds delicious. Congratulations on your beautiful family as well.

Thanks Garb!  It was ridiculously good!  I am a lucky fellow...far luckier than I deserve!

Vr

Matt

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 08-16-2018, 03:35 PM
#5
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Very nice Matt.  I drink red wine every night and always have a good selection of Malbec in my inventory.

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 08-16-2018, 03:44 PM
#6
  • Garb
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  • Oregon
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Looks like a wonderful evening. thanks for taking the time to share.

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 08-16-2018, 04:31 PM
#7
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Gents,

My pleasure to share! All part of the fun!

Red wine every night is healthy for the heart, and I think that Florida weather is as well!!!

Vr

Matt

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 08-16-2018, 09:20 PM
#8
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(08-16-2018, 03:12 PM)Ols67 Wrote: Marrying into an Italian family has been interesting . . .  one of THE meals is steak and homemade fettuccine alfredo with wine!  This dinner is also some what special to me because one of my best pals would frequently have to do a bunch of little deployments to various places, and each time he would come home I would ask Jena to make this meal for him!

So what a treat to have it this week...home made fettuccine, beautifully marbled ribeye steaks, and some nice Malbec wine!

Although I am not Vinny, taking the cue of the topic line, my comments go straight to the wine.  (Apologies to the ribeye and fettucine alfredo.)

The best evidence (so far) of the provenance of Malbec is northern Bourgogne; it is the dominant (minimum 70%), sometimes only, component of the Black Wine of Cahors, which — oral legend tells us — was, in turn, the, um, “inspiration” for Ernest Hemingway’s writing.  But Italian?  We have not seen any Malbec in Italian wines.  (A different French import, Cabernet Franc, however, is an essential component in the exquisite wines of Carmignano, and is what the sophisticated quaffers of Venezia allude to — not Cabernet Sauvignon — when they refer to “cabernet," alternatively, “bordo,” a favorite table wine in Venetian restaurants.)  

Which (Italian wine) is what we drink, primarily, in our own home.  A meme in our household is, “The first duty of every wine is to be red."  But a secondary consideration is, “ . . . preferably Italian, and definitely not jammy.”  (A good red should stand on its own two feet, and never rely on sugary-syrupy for its appeal.)  

Malbec — especially Cahors — is famously thick:  loaded down with polyphenols.  No sissy is Malbec.  But, for sheer depth and strength, Malbec would have one hell of a fight on its hands were it foolishly to challenge the Italian (specifically, Umbrian) varietal, Sagrantino di Montefalco; and it would lose the fight.  Sagrantino is the Rocky Marciano of wines:  (Marciano retired undefeated:  W/L, 49-0, and of his 49 victories, 43 were by knockout).  Too bad Sagrantino is so expensive.  Marciano, a man of the working class, would not have been a Sagrantino drinker.

The last five plus years, we have been seduced by a Barbera varietal from the under-appreciated Lombardian region of Oltrepo Pavese (literally, “the other side of the Po River from Pavia"), the obscurity of which has kept the prices of the region’s wines affordable.  Barbera Oltrepo Pavese is a nice, sturdy, daily drinker that wears well — familiarity does not breed contempt — and, I’ll wager, would be the perfect accompaniment to your very alluring fettucine and ribeye steaks, to which I now raise my glass:  
Cin-cin!!

[Image: CgVOcVC.jpg]

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 08-17-2018, 02:37 AM
#9
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Thanks Tom for the wonderful post! I am certainly going to have to find a bottle of this/these once I get back to Virginia!!!

Have a happy Friday/weekend my friend!

Vr

Matt

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