08-24-2018, 02:18 PM
#1
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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Hi!
I'm a beginning photographer, so be gentle. Smile
Images were taken with a Canon S70 PowerShot. I have a Konica AutoReflex T as well. I actually prefer it, but sometimes it is convenient to shove a digital in your pocket because you never know when you might see something interesting.


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 08-24-2018, 03:24 PM
#2
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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 08-24-2018, 04:24 PM
#3
  • eengler
  • Administrator
  • South Dakota, USA
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Mike it sounds like your enjoying the process and that’s the point of any hobby. Keep taking great photos and critique them. Over time you will develop your own style and way of seeing. Well done!

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 08-24-2018, 04:29 PM
#4
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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Thanks. I'm already looking at everything a little differently. Framing it for a shot, lol.

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 08-25-2018, 03:47 AM
#5
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(08-24-2018, 02:18 PM)SRNewb Wrote: Hi!
I'm a beginning photographer, so be gentle. Smile
Images were taken with a Canon S70 PowerShot. I have a Konica AutoReflex T as well. I actually prefer it, but sometimes it is convenient to shove a digital in your pocket because you never know when you might see something interesting.

You are off to a great start; for one you already have learned a lesson that some of us (I was one) took all too long to learn:  the best camera is the one you have with you when a scene presents itself.  The camera left home because it was a bother to lug around has kind of missed the point.  

After I had been shooting “seriously” for more than four decades, I stumbled across a Flickr site of a then-amateur photographer (like me, but much younger), who was producing simply amazing images of a gorgeous location that (by then) I had been photographing, using fairly advanced (film) equipment, for years and years.  The young woman’s tool was a Canon PowerShot like the one that you used to capture the images you posted, and her images were several orders of magnitude superior to any of the photos that I had made with my hoity-toity SLR.  

I studied her photos, trying to figure out what she was doing that (obviously) I was not, and that exercise made me (I think) a better photographer.  As you seem to like nature-dominated photography, and have shown in the photos above that you “get it,” here is the URL for a page of photos by the (now semi-pro) photographer of the location that she and I both love:  Starlisa’s take on Bird Creek Meadows.  Take a look (her home page is Starlisa Home Page) and see if her craft inspires you as it did me.

You already are doing well; keep it up.

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 08-25-2018, 04:14 AM
#6
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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Good Lord, those are breathtaking! Thanks for that link. I will study the tar out of that.
And yes, I love nature and natural settings. I was raised in the outdoors, but physical issues caused me to give up most of the activities I enjoyed in the outdoors. But it is easy to tote a camera around and snap pics of it. Now I can see it new.

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 08-25-2018, 04:29 AM
#7
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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Mike, keep on framing and snapping. Nature shots are fun to take. With patience and experience you will find your pictures will astound!

Tom, you’re right. Starlisa’s photographs are breathtaking.

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 08-25-2018, 06:47 AM
#8
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I appreciate it when a photographer integrates a unique preference into their work. Some do this by shooting specific subjects (nature, architecture, macro, candids, etc), others perhaps by style (B&W, high contrast, shadows). Shooting during sunset/sunrise are easy ways to capture good lighting - and partly-cloudy days can afford nice personality. Shooting from unique perspectives can also be a fun challenge: birds-eye, peeking partly around corners, “through” things like leaves, doorways, windows, etc.

A good photo-editor like Lightroom isn’t necessary, but can help “rescue” over/under-exposed shots, bring back character in difficult areas like clouds, and allow you to correct tilted horizons.

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 08-25-2018, 12:49 PM
#9
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Snap, snap, snap! Shoot everything, and look at other photographs for inspiration into composition. I have noticed over the years how many more "keepers" I have, it is like any other hobby or activity, practice makes perfect.

I also recommend Adobe Lightroom because I like the cataloging capabilities in addition to the exposure settings. If you jump to shooting in RAW, Lightroom is a no-brainer.

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 08-25-2018, 01:28 PM
#10
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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(08-25-2018, 12:49 PM)Gig103 Wrote: Snap, snap, snap! Shoot everything, and look at other photographs for inspiration into composition. I have noticed over the years how many more "keepers" I have, it is like any other hobby or activity, practice makes perfect.

I also recommend Adobe Lightroom because I like the cataloging capabilities in addition to the exposure settings. If you jump to shooting in RAW, Lightroom is a no-brainer.

I spent about three hours today roaming around with two cameras, lol. People must have thought I was nuts. Shot about 30 on 35mm, and 29 in digital format. My film camera is fully manual. Light meter doesn't even work. So I use that to play around with aperture and shutter speed, trying to learn that stuff. Have to send that off to the Darkroom. But the digital is instant gratification. Nice to have the combination. I know that my digital can be set to manual, I just need to dig into it and figure out how everything works.
I have a set of 3 Minolta lenses; I would love to be able to find a 35mm body. I spent about two hours roaming around flea markets, yard sales and antique malls looking, but no luck yet. My budget is tight, tight, and that isn't likely to change anytime soon, so I'm hoping to run across a camera body for $20-$50 I know it is possible, it will just take time.. Til then, what I have will serve me just fine, and i can learn how to set up or frame the shot, which is probably way more important anyway.
The little point and shoot I have right now is just as much fun as the 35mm; the excitement of hunting down and capturing the shot is the driver for me, anyway.
Thanks to everyone who took the time to look and/or comment.

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 08-26-2018, 04:56 AM
#11
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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Mike, years ago I had a small fortune tied up in LEICA equipment.  I loved shooting B&W.  But like everything else in the digital age, film, film processing and the availiablity and price of both, I sold all of my equipment to a collector.

Like everyone has said, practice makes perfect and you are off to a good start.  I really like your pictures.

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 08-26-2018, 09:36 AM
#12
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
User Info
Thanks, Johnny. And yep, I saw your pictures of your cameras in the "what camera are you using" thread, I think. They were lovely, and it would have been hard for me to give them up.
As for film and the cost, we still have a place locally that you can have the film developed, and it isn't too costly, as long as it's just a roll at a time. I love shooting with the old film camera I have, and am loathe to give it up; in fact, I may double down and buy another if I run across it. I can shoot a roll at a time, and supplement with judicious digital shooting between.
If I get lucky enough to find a digital I can afford that will take my lenses, hey.......but the pictures are way more important to me that how I capture them. As long as I have something to shoot with, I'll keep hittin' the button.

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 08-28-2018, 03:48 PM
#13
  • Garb
  • Active Member
  • Oregon
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(08-25-2018, 03:47 AM)Mel S Meles Wrote:
(08-24-2018, 02:18 PM)SRNewb Wrote: Hi!
I'm a beginning photographer, so be gentle. Smile
Images were taken with a Canon S70 PowerShot. I have a Konica AutoReflex T as well. I actually prefer it, but sometimes it is convenient to shove a digital in your pocket because you never know when you might see something interesting.

You are off to a great start; for one you already have learned a lesson that some of us (I was one) took all too long to learn:  the best camera is the one you have with you when a scene presents itself.  The camera left home because it was a bother to lug around has kind of missed the point.  

After I had been shooting “seriously” for more than four decades, I stumbled across a Flickr site of a then-amateur photographer (like me, but much younger), who was producing simply amazing images of a gorgeous location that (by then) I had been photographing, using fairly advanced (film) equipment, for years and years.  The young woman’s tool was a Canon PowerShot like the one that you used to capture the images you posted, and her images were several orders of magnitude superior to any of the photos that I had made with my hoity-toity SLR.  

I studied her photos, trying to figure out what she was doing that (obviously) I was not, and that exercise made me (I think) a better photographer.  As you seem to like nature-dominated photography, and have shown in the photos above that you “get it,” here is the URL for a page of photos by the (now semi-pro) photographer of the location that she and I both love:  Starlisa’s take on Bird Creek Meadows.  Take a look (her home page is Starlisa Home Page) and see if her craft inspires you as it did me.

You already are doing well; keep it up.


It seems this person is near my home in Oregon. Very pretty inspirational photos. we can all learn something viewing this collection and thank you for sharing the link to these

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