09-02-2018, 09:34 AM
#1
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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Hi, I am new to photography, and shooting basically point and shot digital, and 35mm SLR.
I want to buy a cheaper DSLR body(thinking 8-10mp Canon EOS from KEH), but use the Minolta lenses I have on my 35mm at the moment.I know that these casn be used, but will have to be used manually, which is how I shoot the 35mm anyway.
Are there any pitfalls or anything I should be aware of when using these specific adapters, and are there cheaper options that work as well?
Thanks.

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 09-03-2018, 11:44 AM
#2
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(09-02-2018, 09:34 AM)SRNewb Wrote: Hi, I am new to photography, and shooting basically point and shot digital, and 35mm SLR.
I want to buy a cheaper DSLR body(thinking 8-10mp Canon EOS from KEH), but use the Minolta lenses I have on my 35mm at the moment.I know that these casn be used, but will have to be used manually, which is how I shoot the 35mm anyway.
Are there any pitfalls or anything I should be aware of when using these specific adapters, and are there cheaper options that work as well?
Thanks.

O.k., here is my very opinionated, but fact-based, opinion.  Maybe half of the experienced photographers reading this will agree with all or part of what follows.

o  I understand both the budgetary and the nostalgic elements of your desire to keep your Minolta film-era lenses.  My first serious camera was a Minolta SR-T101, and it was the only camera that I owned or used for over a decade; it served me well, and never gave me problems, and I liked the two lenses (58 mm f/1.4 and 135 mm f/3.5) that I used with it.  BUT . . .

o  Using adapters to fit lenses designed for one system to the mounts of bodies of another system is fraught with problems and frustrations, not the least of which being that the makers of adapters (with very few exceptions) skimp on quality control for that accessory; they know that the buyers of lens adapters are in a budget pinch and will buy mainly on the basis of price, so there is a scant market for quality-made lens adapters; accordingly, they adjust manufacturing parameters with price as the primary criterion.  (Of course there are those few exceptions, mainly for fitting very expensive high-end lenses like Leica Summicrons to very expensive camera bodies like Swiss Alpas; but those adapters cost more than most same-brand lenses.)  Even if the adapter works o.k. for you right away, do not count on durability or fine tolerances in fit and finish.  

o  Your possibility for growth with lenses of a system that no longer is made is quite limited.  Minolta abandoned and orphaned its film camera lens mount when it went digital; then Konica and Minolta merged; then Konica-Minolta exited the photography business altogether, selling the photography-related assets to Sony, which adopted it own lens mounts (plural).  It is safe to assume that there never will be made another lens in the old Minolta Rokkor mount.  

o  On the digital camera body side, Canon is (by far) the largest selling camera brand, and one might think that there are myriad lenses out there that would fit any Canon body; you would be only half-right.  Canon over the years has shown less loyalty to its customer base than the average working-class prostitute shows to the johns who climb into bed with her.  After the end of my Minolta days, I bought into the Canon system, just a couple of years after it had changed its lens mount to the great consternation of its customer base who had thousands of dollars invested in Canon lenses, and with a loss of a significant portion of the professional photographers who had bought tens of thousands of dollars worth of Canon lenses.  I was confident that Canon had learned its lesson, and would not make that mistake again; I was wrong.  Two years later, still in the film era, Canon changed its lens mount again and added a marshmallow to the cup of hot chocolate by changing the filter size, previously uniform at 55 mm for all or most lenses between 28 mm and 135 mm, to 52 mm, requiring the purchase of entire sets of new filters.  Then, when Canon went digital, it changed the lens mount again, and has changed it a couple times since, each time with only limited backward compatibility.  I never would advocate trusting Canon to protect your investment.  

o  Two major camera makers have worked very hard to preserve backward compatability:  Nikon, which tends to be pricey, and Asahi/Hoya/Ricoh, the successive makers of Pentax brand cameras.  A new Ricoh-made Pentax KP body, for example, can accept (with relatively inexpensive Pentax brand adapters) lenses made for the Asahi Pentax Spotmatic cameras of the early 1960s, which, for many years, were the best-selling SLR cameras of all time, by a fair margin. (Of course, using an M42 screw-mount Spotmatic lens on a KP body, you cannot take advantage of all of the technology packed into the KP, but you have all of the automation that the lens facilitated on the Spotmatic body of its time.)  There are literally tens of thousands of used Pentax-compatible lenses of various focal lengths on the used market, which generally sell at relative bargain prices.   Here is a thread on photo.net that you may find profit from browsing:  https://www.photo.net/discuss/threads/re...rs.483061/

o  So, if you are getting into SLR photography and hope to grow as your skills improve, my recommendation would be to invest in, say, a 2008-era “semi-pro” Pentax K20D body (just as an example; you can find a full review on dpreview.com), and an inexpensive Pentax-compatible lens, maybe even one from a third-party maker (e.g., Sigma 18-250 mm HSM macro).  Your future then would have much wider horizons than you would have with a Canon digital body Rube Goldberg contrapted to accept film-era Minolta lenses.

. . . just my $0.02.

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 09-03-2018, 12:16 PM
#3
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then there is 2 1/4 format...

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 09-03-2018, 07:37 PM
#4
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I’m just here to agree that it’s better to expand your options than restrict them. I’d choose a camera body that allows the widest range of (ideally native) lenses you might choose going forward. As mentioned, there are a number of well performing options like Sigma that can keep the price down. You can get great deals on used gear, so long as your ready to test before buying. Photography advice I was once given: you date the camera body, but marry the lenses.

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 09-03-2018, 07:44 PM
#5
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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Thanks, gentlemen.
I appreciate the advice; it is wise.
However it is not doable for me. My budget is very, very small.
When I mentioned an 8-10 megapixel DSLR, that was my limit. Around $100 for everything. 
I am shooting with a 7 megapixel point and shoot. Moving to a DSLR with a larger sensor, and what has to be better optics than what is in the little p&s, even if it is at the lower end, has got to better than what I'm using now.
I really do appreciate all of your input, and would take the advice if I could.
An 8mp EOS model and a converter with optics so I can get infinity focus will come to around my budget. It won't be tack sharp,  be a bit soft around the edges, and no one is going to rave over the picture quality. But it will give me the feel of my vintage 35mm(sort of), and be more what I'm looking for.
I will most likely purchase the adapter and the camera body in the near future.
Once again I truly appreciate your advice, but I'm just trying to share photos online that are at least as good or a bit better than the point and shoot I'm using, and get the feel of a better camera.

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 09-03-2018, 10:35 PM
#6
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(09-03-2018, 07:44 PM)SRNewb Wrote: I am shooting with a 7 megapixel point and shoot. Moving to a DSLR with a larger sensor, and what has to be better optics than what is in the little p&s, even if it is at the lower end, has got to better than what I'm using now.

I do not necessarily concur with your assessment.  More megapixels have their use for large physical prints.  But, if you are shooting for computer screen sharing or for prints up to about 11x14 inches, seven megapixel resolution is more than enough.  Below is a photo that I took with a (very small Fujifilm XF1) compact, handheld, in Piazza San Marco in Venezia three years ago.  The resolution of the photo is 2816 × 2112 pixels, which equals only 5.9 megapixels, and the file size of the original .jpg file is 2.9 MB.  Do you detect any lack of detail or limitation of dynamic range that a camera that had a larger sensor might have avoided?


[Image: ZgIiivg.jpg]


Your Canon PowerShot may well have a lens that by all important criteria can produce a digital image that is superior to what the the dated Minolta full-frame SLR len(es) that you have on hand could produce with any digital SLR body.  Many of Darlisa Black's (Starlisa's) superb images were captured with a compact fixed-lens camera similar to yours.  From the point of view of a lens designer/engineer, it is much easier to design a lens that will illuminate a small digital camera sensor than it is to design a lens that will illuminate a much larger sensor edge-to-edge.  If it is ultimate image quality that you strive for, the humble fixed-lens compact that you have in your hands may well have the capability to run rings around any digital SLR and lenses that are anywhere near within your budget.

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 09-04-2018, 03:09 AM
#7
  • SRNewb
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Thank you, much appreciated.

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 09-04-2018, 05:59 AM
#8
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This is one of the set-ups I am using:
Sony α6000.
K&F Concepts Adapter.  The one I have on my camera is excellent of quality.  Machined metal.  Tight fit for both the body and camera mounts.  The focal length is perfect and is identical to the Sony lens.  No out of focus issues.
Minolta MD W ROKKOR-X 28mm f2.8-f22 Manual Focus.  For me, these old Minolta lens are like a Gillette Fatboy - great engineering, long life if cared for. They have excellent glass with metal construction.

What I am liking is the throw back to the days where you had to manually focus and manually set the fstop.  The 6000 has a feature called "peak focusing" which aids in focusing.  Kind of like the old manual SLRs that had the focusing prism. (see below)  I also believe it is adding to my picture taking skills since I have to actually compose the shot and set the focus and fstop.  A throw-back to the days where we did not have auto focus and image stabilization.  You had to know what you were doing - no point and shoot.

A good lens can be had in the $40.00 to $75.00 range.

Just my experience with a modern mirrorless camera and a retro lens using this adapter.

Hope this helps.


[Image: 8gghtVM.jpg]

[Image: dh8kMK2.jpg][Image: 0AcSGMA.jpg]

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 09-04-2018, 06:04 AM
#9
  • Garb
  • Active Member
  • Oregon
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Man here's a full thread worth it's weight with some great advice. I've always said buy the best you can afford and you'll never have to second guess yourself. 

with that said I bought into Canon in the mid 60's and have just rolled with the punches through the years. Reason being that I abuse things and play rough with my equipment no matter what game it is I'm playing.

Good luck with your choices of which there are many..........

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 09-04-2018, 06:19 AM
#10
  • SRNewb
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  • No. Va, USA
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Thanks, gentlemen.
LookingGlass, when you use the adapter, can you leave it on the camera when switching lens, or do you have to remove the whole assembly, remove the adapter, affix to next lens, then mount on camera?
No big deal either way, but I shoot with prime lenses, and tend to switch often, depending on what/where I'm shooting.
And I prefer to shoot in manual as well. Which is another drawback of the point and shoot. Some of them let you adjust a lot manually, others not so much. And even then, it's not the same.
The old AutoReflex T I use, the light meter doesn't even work. It's manual all the way. Up to me to judge the light, and choose proper f stop, ISO, and shutter speed. So used to that, now.

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 09-04-2018, 06:29 AM
#11
  • Garb
  • Active Member
  • Oregon
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Just curious which Canon are you wanting to purchase?

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 09-04-2018, 06:42 AM
#12
  • SRNewb
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Nothing great. One of the Canon EOS 30D. I know, everyone will say it is old, outdated, not modern enough, 8mp is junk, etc. But my budget is my budget. And my circumstances won't be changing anytime soon.
But if I can keep the quality I have, but move up to a DSLR that I can use my old lenses with,shoot them manually the way I like, and have the same feel(sort of) as my 35mm cameras with the advantage of no developing costs, i can shoot more, enjoy it more, and still shoot my 35mm time to time as well.
Can't see that as a bad thing.

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 09-04-2018, 08:06 AM
#13
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(09-04-2018, 06:19 AM)SRNewb Wrote: Thanks, gentlemen.
LookingGlass, when you use the adapter, can you leave it on the camera when switching lens, or do you have to remove the whole assembly, remove the adapter, affix to next lens, then mount on camera?
No big deal either way, but I shoot with prime lenses, and tend to switch often, depending on what/where I'm shooting.
And I prefer to shoot in manual as well. Which is another drawback of the point and shoot. Some of them let you adjust a lot manually, others not so much. And even then, it's not the same.
The old AutoReflex T I use, the light meter doesn't even work. It's manual all the way. Up to me to judge the light, and choose proper f stop, ISO, and shutter speed. So used to that, now.

Yes.  You can change the lens without removing the adapter from the camera.

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 09-04-2018, 08:13 AM
#14
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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(09-04-2018, 08:06 AM)LookingGlass Wrote:
(09-04-2018, 06:19 AM)SRNewb Wrote: Thanks, gentlemen.
LookingGlass, when you use the adapter, can you leave it on the camera when switching lens, or do you have to remove the whole assembly, remove the adapter, affix to next lens, then mount on camera?
No big deal either way, but I shoot with prime lenses, and tend to switch often, depending on what/where I'm shooting.
And I prefer to shoot in manual as well. Which is another drawback of the point and shoot. Some of them let you adjust a lot manually, others not so much. And even then, it's not the same.
The old AutoReflex T I use, the light meter doesn't even work. It's manual all the way. Up to me to judge the light, and choose proper f stop, ISO, and shutter speed. So used to that, now.

Yes.  You can change the lens without removing the adapter from the camera.

Thanks, Ed!

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