09-24-2018, 09:40 AM
#1
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When I first started wet-shaving, my biggest mistake in lathering was chasing the lather that you see in pics and vids.  The problem was that most of the time it was under-hydrated.  I learned my lesson and started adding more water to get better shaves.  Now I'm wondering if I've gone overboard and started over-hydrating my lathers.  Now don't get me wrong, my shaves are good and I love the soaps that I have.  I just want to get the most out of them.  Anyone else have this issue?

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 09-24-2018, 09:56 AM
#2
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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Like you, Preacher I've learned to use more water for a good shaving lather. When white water drips down my neck onto my chest I have over hydrated. If that doesn't happen I'm good to go.

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 09-24-2018, 09:58 AM
#3
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I too have learned to add more water than I used to.  Basically, I work up my lather until I get that sheen to the lather and the peaks are soft, not sharp.  I stop there.  If I add more then I end up with over hydrated lather.

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 09-24-2018, 10:01 AM
#4
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I would offer this perspective: If the integrity of your lather remains good, i.e. no dissipation, then you have NOT over-hydrated. Drippy and somewhat loose is not necessarily a bad thing. It's a messy thing.  Biggrin

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 09-24-2018, 11:01 AM
#5
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indeed, when the foam is too hydrated, then it "evaporates".

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 09-24-2018, 11:46 AM
#6
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Is there a point where we start sacrificing slickness by adding more water?

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 09-24-2018, 11:49 AM
#7
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the glide no, the protection yes on the other hand,

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 09-24-2018, 04:05 PM
#8
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As a general rule, I try to add as much water as I can without having it start getting on my chest and hands.

When not in a hurry, I try to get lather that is kind of a cross between cool-whip and yogurt.

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 09-24-2018, 09:02 PM
#9
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Water is good, air is bad. The difficulty is in that when you add water too quickly air finds its way into your lather and, to my taste, ruins it. The only way to avoid foamy lather is to add water slowly. Then you can add as much as your soap/cream likes.

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 09-25-2018, 07:50 AM
#10
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(09-24-2018, 09:02 PM)lloydrm Wrote: Water is good, air is bad. The difficulty is in that when you add water too quickly air finds its way into your lather and, to my taste, ruins it. The only way to avoid foamy lather is to add water slowly. Then you can add as much as your soap/cream likes.

this. 

People also add too much air by overly vigorously swirling the brush.  Calm down a bit, and add water little bit by little bit, incorporating fully before adding more water, and you will get nice, sour-cream like lather every time.

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 09-25-2018, 08:00 AM
#11
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I’m at a point now after using creams and soaps with a brush for well over 15+ years and seriously as a hobby for now 7+ years where I don’t speculate over too much/too little hydration.

I just do it and continue until I see the shine on my lather. It has to look a bit shiny and wet, yet still look like a meringue on my face.

The best soaps in my den takes very little effort to obtain a perfect lather.
For instance I used CRSW Oliva Colonia last night. It takes less effort to make the lather perfect from this soap than it does to make a lather from any of my many 100’s top creams.

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 09-25-2018, 08:02 AM
#12
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I actually do add my water a little at a time and work it into the lather (swirling the brush) until fully incorporated.  I then add a little more water.  I don't rush since shaving is a relaxation for me.  A good lather and excellent shave is more important to me than the time it takes to build a good lather.

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 09-25-2018, 08:08 AM
#13
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(09-25-2018, 08:00 AM)CHSeifert Wrote: I’m at a point now after using creams and soaps with a brush for well over 15+ years and seriously as a hobby for now 7+ years where I don’t speculate over too much/too little hydration.

I just do it and continue until I see the shine on my lather. It has to look a bit shiny and wet, yet still look like a meringue on my face.

The best soaps in my den takes very little effort to obtain a perfect lather.
For instance I used CRSW Oliva Colonia last night. It takes less effort to make the lather perfect from this soap than it does to make a lather from any of my many 100’s top creams.

Sounds like you have a lot more experience that I do.  None of my soaps are hard to lather.  I'm just always wondering (even after a great shave) is the lather I make optimal.  Perhaps I'm obsessing since I do get a great shave with them.

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 09-25-2018, 08:46 AM
#14
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I did the same back in 2011.
Wondered if my lather was okay.

Experience will make you more secure of what your lather should look like.

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 09-25-2018, 08:51 AM
#15
  • Puma
  • Active Member
  • Central Jersey
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When I started using a brush and soaps as opposed to canned stuff, I rushed it and didn't hydrate enough. Then I got advice from here and other shaving sites to take more time and add more water, but add it little by little. I definitely took it too far, and for a while I was using too much water. I have since dialed it back a little to somewhere in between the two extremes, and now I get consistently slicker and smoother lather with much less running down the handle. IMHO, when you get it right there is a huge difference in shave quality and post-shave skin feel compared to when you don't.

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 09-25-2018, 09:04 AM
#16
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REALITY CHECK: The slick and cushion in your soap is only effective on a microscopic level between the surface of your skin and the blade *
Try a lather-less shave cream, you'll see. Cheers




* My personal opinion and observations carried out in pseudo-scientific experiments.

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 09-29-2018, 07:28 AM
#17
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(09-24-2018, 11:46 AM)Preacher Wrote: Is there a point where we start sacrificing slickness by adding more water?


I find if I don't work the soap & water enough and don't achieve the optimal emulsion, the lather remains thin (i.e. Too watery) and I lose slickness.

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 09-29-2018, 12:05 PM
#18
  • Puma
  • Active Member
  • Central Jersey
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(09-29-2018, 07:28 AM)nav Wrote:
(09-24-2018, 11:46 AM)Preacher Wrote: Is there a point where we start sacrificing slickness by adding more water?


I find if I don't work the soap & water enough and don't achieve the optimal emulsion, the lather remains thin (i.e. Too watery) and I lose slickness.

Signs011

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