10-10-2018, 04:49 PM
#21
  • SCOV
  • Senior Member
  • Minnesota
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I was partially converted to bourbons by pure luck.  I was "allowed" to buy a bottle of Pappy Van Winke 15 year and purchased Bob Dylan' Heaven's Door when released.  

Bourbons are lower cost here in the US.  I do understand some tariff wars may impact bourbon prices outside of the US.  As mentioned in  previous posts, Woodford Reserve and  Buffalo Trace are good bourbons at a bargain price plus a nice transition to/from scotch.  I do like a whisky with some body and not sweet.

Boss gave me a sample of El Dorado Rum barrel aged approx. 8 years old - very impressed.  Guessing anything barrel aged will agree with me.

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 10-10-2018, 07:37 PM
#22
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(10-09-2018, 02:54 PM)bullgoose Wrote: I am more of a bourbon and rye whisky drinker as I am not a fan of the peat.

I am with you. I have tried several scotches (don't remember which ones as it was a long time ago), just don't like the peat. Give me a good bourbon. I just love the aroma and the smooth drinking.

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 10-11-2018, 01:17 AM
#23
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(10-10-2018, 03:40 AM)Ols67 Wrote: I like both regular and rye bourbons, and it depends on what mood strikes me...kind of like the difference between soap and creams!

There are so many good bourbons now that it would be a shame to limit oneself to one or two. However, I really like Bookers Bourbon (don’t let the high proof scare you...each batch is ridiculously smooth and equally good!); Knob Creek Rye; and Blantons!

Those are my top three...sort of like my top three soaps and creams are MDC, ABC, and SMN! Honorable mentions have to go to Hemingway and Baume.be!

Enjoy!

Vr

Matt

Matt, I actually have owned a bottle of knob creek rye.
It was a very nice smooth drink.
I will look into the other two on your list.

Thanks.

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 10-11-2018, 01:24 AM
#24
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(10-10-2018, 05:10 AM)DannyZ Wrote: Claus, I discovered dark and aged rums while living in Italy and I haven't looked back.  I also love bourbon.  Blanton's, Buffalo Trace, and 1792 are my current favorites.  As Matt said, there are many good bourbons now and most of them can be had for $50 or less.  (at least in Texas)

Unfortunately the top bourbon here in Denmark now cost from $85-$125 these days.

You can still get the cheaper bourbon like Jim Bean and Markers Mark for $25-$45 a bottle.

I think it’s a combination of Trump, supply/demand and shipping cost per bottle, that drives the price on the more high priced bourbons even higher here.

Whisky and whiskey are just more popular here in Europe in general, thus the price per bottle is lower for the resellers.

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 10-11-2018, 01:26 AM
#25
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(10-09-2018, 02:51 PM)Bony Wrote: Hi Claus ! Highly recommend for you to try 12 years old Glenmorangie and Macallan any variety. CHEERS!

I will give the Glenmorangie 12 a try later this month.
It will be on offer at my local supermarket in 2 weeks at 30% reduced price.

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 10-11-2018, 06:29 AM
#26
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You wont be disappointed with either...if I ever make it out your way I will bring a bottle of bookers...it’s my go to bottle!

Vr

Matt


(10-11-2018, 01:17 AM)CHSeifert Wrote:
(10-10-2018, 03:40 AM)Ols67 Wrote: I like both regular and rye bourbons, and it depends on what mood strikes me...kind of like the difference between soap and creams!

There are so many good bourbons now that it would be a shame to limit oneself to one or two. However, I really like Bookers Bourbon (don’t let the high proof scare you...each batch is ridiculously smooth and equally good!); Knob Creek Rye; and Blantons!

Those are my top three...sort of like my top three soaps and creams are MDC, ABC, and SMN! Honorable mentions have to go to Hemingway and Baume.be!

Enjoy!

Vr

Matt

Matt, I actually have owned a bottle of knob creek rye.
It was a very nice smooth drink.
I will look into the other two on your list.

Thanks.

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 10-11-2018, 05:16 PM
#27
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(10-09-2018, 11:03 AM)primotenore Wrote: Here you go Claus. You better like Peat taste, though.
http://www.laphroaig.com

This x100.  I would describe Laphroaig as dragging your tongue through a swamp.  I love it.

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 10-11-2018, 05:21 PM
#28
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(10-09-2018, 02:43 PM)SCOV Wrote: Good choices -->  I consider trying a bottle of 10-12 years from Highland Park, Tallisker, Laphroig and Macallan 

(Laphroig would be too peaty based on your comments).


I hope to try Isle of Jura's new offereings soon.  Balvinie Doublewood also a favorite.  I had Springbank a few years ago and recall complex and medium peaty (peated ?)


10-14 years is good balance for depth of flavor and cost.  Some of the 8 year old are just too young.

I have not had a 8 year old that I like.  It's just too young.  My favorite is always the 18-year-old, but that comes at a premium.  If you can find some, try Yamazaki.  The Japanese stuff is getting really good reviews.  I had the 18 year in a cigar lounge in Florida.  It was simply excellent (should be at $45 a shot).

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 10-11-2018, 10:43 PM
#29
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For an 'everyday' sort of sipping whiskey I will grab a Jameson Irish Whiskey.

For single malts I'm a fan of the Speyside region Scotch. Macallans that are matured in sherry casks are my favorites. Not all of them are < $100 though. Glenfiddich is nice too but I've outgrown Glenlivet.

Currently, Costco has put their private label (Kirkland Signature) on a 20 year single malt which has been "sherry finished". For $60 it's a bargain, very smooth and mildly sweet. I know their stock rotates quickly so I made sure to go back and get a second bottle - if it was a brand name it would sell for $100+ easily.

For bourbon I like Woodford Reserve. I am glad it's popular on airlines because if I'm going to have a drink on board the flight, it's a solid option and nicer than Jack or Jim.

(10-11-2018, 05:21 PM)Preacher Wrote: If you can find some, try Yamazaki.  The Japanese stuff is getting really good reviews.  I had the 18 year in a cigar lounge in Florida.  It was simply excellent (should be at $45 a shot).


When I was in Tokyo I was determined to bring home some Yamakazi. I had to go to five different stores before finding some 12-year vintage. Nobody had the 18. There was a display bottle at the airport duty free of the 18 year and I wonder if (a) it's even real and (b) how many times a day someone asks to buy the display bottle.

It's a very good whiskey, but the 12-year isn't as complex as some other Scotches out there even in similar age ranges. For a 12 year it's smoother than a lot of others though IMO.

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 10-13-2018, 09:44 AM
#30
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Macallan all day for me... 17 fine oak is my personal fav

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 10-13-2018, 09:55 AM
#31
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(10-11-2018, 10:43 PM)Gig103 Wrote: Currently, Costco has put their private label (Kirkland Signature) on a 20 year single malt which has been "sherry finished". For $60 it's a bargain, very smooth and mildly sweet. I know their stock rotates quickly so I made sure to go back and get a second bottle - if it was a brand name it would sell for $100+ easily.

I was not aware that Costco had branded their own Kirkland single malt.  The Costco that I normally shop at does not stock alcohol so I'm going to have to find one that does and pick some up.  I'm intrigued.  I really like Balvenie's versions that are aged in Port or Sherry casks so I'm sure I'm going to like this one.  Thanks for bringing this to my attention.  Now, to find a Costco not too far from me that has alcohol.  Hmmmmmm.............

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 10-15-2018, 09:57 AM
#32
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I’m settling on these 5 whisky’s for now:

Talisker 10 year
Highland Park 12 year
Macallan 12 year
Ardbeg 10 year
Glenmorangie 12 year

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 10-15-2018, 01:32 PM
#33
  • Bony
  • Active Member
  • New York , USA
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Right choice Claus ! Cheers !

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 10-15-2018, 06:21 PM
#34
  • evnpar
  • Emeritus
  • Portland, Oregon
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I was into 12 - 18 year old expensive single malts until my wife gave me a sampler of Jameson Irish Whiskey for father's day. Now I'm hooked, and much prefer relatively inexpensive Bushmills and Jameson Irish Whiskey blends to scotch. Go figure.

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 10-15-2018, 07:31 PM
#35
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(10-15-2018, 06:21 PM)evnpar Wrote: I was into 12 - 18 year old expensive single malts until my wife gave me a sampler of Jameson Irish Whiskey for father's day. Now I'm hooked, and much prefer relatively inexpensive Bushmills and Jameson Irish Whiskey blends to scotch. Go figure.

I actually also enjoy the cheap regular Jameson Irish Whiskey with one small ice cube and I can get the Jameson for 100 dkr/$15 a bottle for, when it's on offer in our local supermarket.

I usually use my cheaper whisky/whiskey/bourbon for two of my favorite drinks - the Boulevardine and the Old Fashioned.

When I shave, I often make myself either an Old Fashioned, a Boulevardine, a Gin-Martini, a Negroni or a Dark & Stormy  - these 5 are my all time favourite drinks  Number_one

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 10-15-2018, 07:33 PM
#36
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(10-15-2018, 01:32 PM)Bony Wrote: Right choice Claus ! Cheers !

Thank you, Sir and cheers to you too  Cheers

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 10-18-2018, 04:38 PM
#37
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Made a few changes to my order:

Laphroaig Quarter Cask, which to me was a better more rounded version of Laphroaig 10 years
Highland Park 12 years
Ardbeg 10 years
Talisker 10 years
Cragganmore 12 years

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 10-19-2018, 06:14 AM
#38
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Glenfiddich 12yr single malt is about as smooth as it gets. The 15yr is smoother but not worth the higher price point IMHO. No mixing for me, just a little club.

I don't know if it's sold in Europe, but Uncle Nearest sour mash is worth trying if smooth whisky is your desire. Oh, and don't forget the cigars - dipping is acceptable.

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 10-19-2018, 07:31 AM
#39
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(10-19-2018, 06:14 AM)Sliver630 Wrote: Glenfiddich 12yr single malt is about as smooth as it gets. The 15yr is smoother but not worth the higher price point IMHO. No mixing for me, just a little club.

I don't know if it's sold in Europe, but Uncle Nearest sour mash is worth trying if smooth whisky is your desire. Oh, and don't forget the cigars - dipping is acceptable.

I actually retired my newly bought Glenfidfich 12 year Single Malt to a cocktail whisky.

I was quite disappointed over how sharp and unbalanced I found it to taste neat or with a drop of water.

Same reaction I had with a Johnnie Walker 12 year Black Label Blend. So bland & boring, that I prefer it in whisky cocktails.

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 10-19-2018, 07:47 AM
#40
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(10-19-2018, 07:31 AM)CHSeifert Wrote:
(10-19-2018, 06:14 AM)Sliver630 Wrote: Glenfiddich 12yr single malt is about as smooth as it gets. The 15yr is smoother but not worth the higher price point IMHO. No mixing for me, just a little club.

I don't know if it's sold in Europe, but Uncle Nearest sour mash is worth trying if smooth whisky is your desire. Oh, and don't forget the cigars - dipping is acceptable.

I actually retired my newly bought Glenfidfich 12 year Single Malt to a cocktail whisky.

I was quite disappointed over how sharp and unbalanced I found it to taste neat or with a drop of water.

Same reaction I had with a Johnnie Walker 12 year Blend. So bland & boring, that I prefer it in whisky cocktails.
"I actually retired my newly bought Glenfidfich 12 year Single Malt to a cocktail whisky."


I wish you would have retired it to me! Shy  

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