12-12-2018, 11:39 AM
#21
User Info
In general:
The better your technique, the longer your blade will last.

54 5,000
Reply
 12-12-2018, 12:14 PM
#22
User Info
I haven't noticed any change in the life of blades during my 3 years of using double edge razors.

1 199
Reply
 12-23-2018, 04:47 AM
#23
  • Mouser
  • Senior Member
  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
User Info
Sorry Charlie that it's taken me so long to get back to you with that explanation of why older vintage blades last so much longer. When I  first started wet shaving I used blades like PSI, Gillette 7 o'clock yellows, Silver Blues etc. I have an average beard and I  typically would get 3 -5 shaves with one. Now, for some time, I've been using strictly vintage blades, several different ones, and I easily get 12 to 14 uses out of them all save one and that one is good for 30+. The answer is that they were simply made better, to higher tolerances, of better quality materials on better maintained machines, whatever. It's not that they can't still make them as well now, even better but if they did the men who make up, at a guess, 80, 85, 90 % of their market couldn't  afford them. The vast majority of men that wet shave are citizens of third world countries who don't have the disposable income to afford blades made to that level of quality.  Cost is the second piece of subjective evidence of their quality,  longevity being the first. For instance I have a dispenser of 15 vintage Gillette Platinum Plus blades from around 1970. The price marked on the card is $2.49. Adjusted for inflation today they'd cost $16.17. That's  $10.78 for ten. You can get 10 Feathers, generally considered a top of the line model, for less than 5 bucks. I'll  have to finish this later, my problem is telling me to lie down for a while but you can see where I'm going with this I'm sure.

8 2,549
Reply
 12-23-2018, 05:18 AM
#24
User Info
I get 2 weeks out of most blades as a daily shaver. I think a lot depends on prep, technique, how often you shave and the razor you use.

I could go longer but I change them out to clean the razor.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

3 847
Reply
 12-23-2018, 08:10 PM
#25
User Info
(11-09-2018, 09:12 AM)punchy Wrote: My experience with double edge blades is that they dull very, very quickly. I'm very fortunate to get two full uses out of new DE blades now days. On the third full use of a new DE blade, I seem to start cutting and slicing up my face. So, that makes me wonder if others are experiencing this same unusually short blade edge life too. I'm also wondering if there are any DE blades out there that have a longer than average blade life, or are they all pretty much the same in this regard? I'm also wondering if single edge blade life might be longer (overall) than DE blades, such as single edge Schick Injector or GEM type blades? Anyone else experiencing this same thing too, or is it just me?
Thanks

Hmmm, I wonder . . . . . 

I read somewhere that blades deteriorate due to oxidation (probably one of several factors), and that oxidation can be minimized by getting all water off the blade by swishing the blade in alcohol. The theory is that the alcohol displaces the water and then evaporates, leaving the blade free of water. I wonder if that would work. Is someone up for an experiment?

17 385
Reply
 12-24-2018, 03:28 AM
#26
  • Mouser
  • Senior Member
  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
User Info
(12-23-2018, 08:10 PM)slackskin Wrote:
(11-09-2018, 09:12 AM)punchy Wrote: My experience with double edge blades is that they dull very, very quickly. I'm very fortunate to get two full uses out of new DE blades now days. On the third full use of a new DE blade, I seem to start cutting and slicing up my face. So, that makes me wonder if others are experiencing this same unusually short blade edge life too. I'm also wondering if there are any DE blades out there that have a longer than average blade life, or are they all pretty much the same in this regard? I'm also wondering if single edge blade life might be longer (overall) than DE blades, such as single edge Schick Injector or GEM type blades? Anyone else experiencing this same thing too, or is it just me?
Thanks

Hmmm, I wonder . . . . . 

I read somewhere that blades deteriorate due to oxidation (probably one of several factors), and that oxidation can be minimized by getting all water off the blade by swishing the blade in alcohol. The theory is that the alcohol displaces the water and then evaporates, leaving the blade free of water. I wonder if that would work. Is someone up for an experiment?

That applies to carbon blades and it's how I  take care of the few pristine vintage ones I use. Stainless was developed specifically because its resistant to such oxidation and they caught on so explosively because men weren't caring properly for their old carbon blades. It's one thing Gillette miscalculated.  The convenience factor. It's why men have gravitated away from what works better in shaving to what's more convenient.  Away from brush and soap to canned foam, away from straights and safety razors to multiblade and electric.

8 2,549
Reply
 12-25-2018, 03:10 PM
#27
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
User Info
(12-23-2018, 04:47 AM)Mouser Wrote: Sorry Charlie that it's taken me so long to get back to you with that explanation of why older vintage blades last so much longer. When I  first started wet shaving I used blades like PSI, Gillette 7 o'clock yellows, Silver Blues etc. I have an average beard and I  typically would get 3 -5 shaves with one. Now, for some time, I've been using strictly vintage blades, several different ones, and I easily get 12 to 14 uses out of them all save one and that one is good for 30+. The answer is that they were simply made better, to higher tolerances, of better quality materials on better maintained machines, whatever. It's not that they can't still make them as well now, even better but if they did the men who make up, at a guess, 80, 85, 90 % of their market couldn't  afford them. The vast majority of men that wet shave are citizens of third world countries who don't have the disposable income to afford blades made to that level of quality.  Cost is the second piece of subjective evidence of their quality,  longevity being the first. For instance I have a dispenser of 15 vintage Gillette Platinum Plus blades from around 1970. The price marked on the card is $2.49. Adjusted for inflation today they'd cost $16.17. That's  $10.78 for ten. You can get 10 Feathers, generally considered a top of the line model, for less than 5 bucks. I'll  have to finish this later, my problem is telling me to lie down for a while but you can see where I'm going with this I'm sure.

Thank you. I appreciate your thoughts and perspective. Per your hypothesis then, it’s really quite a shame that there isn’t any manufacturer willing to produce a super deluxe, high-end DE blade. I’d buy ‘em.

10 3,327
Reply
 12-27-2018, 03:48 AM
#28
  • Mouser
  • Senior Member
  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
User Info
(12-25-2018, 03:10 PM)chazt Wrote:
(12-23-2018, 04:47 AM)Mouser Wrote: Sorry Charlie that it's taken me so long to get back to you with that explanation of why older vintage blades last so much longer. When I  first started wet shaving I used blades like PSI, Gillette 7 o'clock yellows, Silver Blues etc. I have an average beard and I  typically would get 3 -5 shaves with one. Now, for some time, I've been using strictly vintage blades, several different ones, and I easily get 12 to 14 uses out of them all save one and that one is good for 30+. The answer is that they were simply made better, to higher tolerances, of better quality materials on better maintained machines, whatever. It's not that they can't still make them as well now, even better but if they did the men who make up, at a guess, 80, 85, 90 % of their market couldn't  afford them. The vast majority of men that wet shave are citizens of third world countries who don't have the disposable income to afford blades made to that level of quality.  Cost is the second piece of subjective evidence of their quality,  longevity being the first. For instance I have a dispenser of 15 vintage Gillette Platinum Plus blades from around 1970. The price marked on the card is $2.49. Adjusted for inflation today they'd cost $16.17. That's  $10.78 for ten. You can get 10 Feathers, generally considered a top of the line model, for less than 5 bucks. I'll  have to finish this later, my problem is telling me to lie down for a while but you can see where I'm going with this I'm sure.

Thank you. I appreciate your thoughts and perspective. Per your hypothesis then, it’s really quite a shame that there isn’t any manufacturer willing to produce a super deluxe, high-end DE blade. I’d buy 
If our way of shaving were to ever recapture a significant share of the market again in the U.S. or if the cost and/or ease of manufacturing such an item becomes more favorable perhaps.

8 2,549
Reply
 02-12-2019, 01:54 AM
#29
  • Mouser
  • Senior Member
  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
User Info
http://www.zafirro.com
Here's an option for a longer lasting  blade. Make them out of sapphire.
http://www.zafirro.com/products
Iridium handle with sapphire blade...$100,000.00

8 2,549
Reply
 02-12-2019, 03:22 AM
#30
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
User Info
(02-12-2019, 01:54 AM)Mouser Wrote: http://www.zafirro.com
Here's an option for a longer lasting  blade. Make them out of sapphire.
http://www.zafirro.com/products
Iridium handle with sapphire blade...$100,000.00

The first link worked. The pictures made me think, this is what Captain Picard might use to shave. The text made me think, ugghhh. Proprietary blades...

10 3,327
Reply
 02-12-2019, 09:14 AM
#31
User Info
No matter the blade I change them after each shave. I like the feeling of a package fresh blade even if it's only in my mind.

1 217
Reply
 02-12-2019, 10:05 AM
#32
User Info
I haven't perceived anything one way or the other about trends in the life of DE blades...but I am finding that the Feather single-edge blades last quite a long time.

10 1,077
Reply
 02-12-2019, 11:26 AM
#33
User Info
I am getting the feeling that the number of shaves you get from a blade is dependent on taste (the legal razor remarked, i only use blades once; while vigilantsed changes at 30 due to boredom) coarseness of the beard, prep, soap, brush, razor, technique and of course the blade. 
can anyone comment on the DE blade making technique and machinery? 
have blades changed much in the last hundred years?
I have a gillette razor made in the 40's but I can still use a blade made 70 ish years later. the razor and blade work as designed with any modification. size and shape remain unchanged.
and my final thought, at 9 - 40 cents a blade maybe legal razor has a point. sharp fellow he is indeed.

0 162
Reply
 02-12-2019, 03:41 PM
#34
  • Mouser
  • Senior Member
  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
User Info
(02-12-2019, 10:05 AM)Rory1262 Wrote: I haven't perceived anything one way or the other about trends in the life of DE blades...but I am finding that the Feather single-edge blades last quite a long time.

The change happened long ago, when DE shaving lost the bulk of the market everywhere except in poorer countries.

8 2,549
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)