12-22-2018, 05:20 PM
#1
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Quote: I love using shave sticks to make lather. In fact I use sticks 80% of the time. I can get great lather every time using a synthetic brush but I have tried using a boar brush many times and recently a silvertip badger brush and I just cannot get half the lather I get with a synthetic brush.
Does anyone else have this same experience.
 

Ron

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 12-22-2018, 06:06 PM
#2
  • pbrmhl
  • Senior Member
  • Seattle
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I'm the opposite. I can use my Irisch Moos shave stick to face lather just fine with my badgers, but just can't do it with my synths. I haven't yet tried one of my boars, but my experience is discouraging, as I only use synths on the road, which is when a stick is most convenient. We're all different!

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 12-22-2018, 06:33 PM
#3
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(12-22-2018, 06:06 PM)pbrmhl Wrote: I'm the opposite. I can use my Irisch Moos shave stick to face lather just fine with my badgers, but just can't do it with my synths. I haven't yet tried one of my boars, but my experience is discouraging, as I only use synths on the road, which is when a stick is most convenient. We're all different!

What happens when you use a synthetic with a stick?

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 12-22-2018, 09:58 PM
#4
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I can get 4-passes from a shave stick, lathered by badger or synth - doesn’t matter which I use ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

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 12-22-2018, 10:12 PM
#5
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(12-22-2018, 05:20 PM)shave/brush Wrote: I love using shave sticks to make lather. In fact I use sticks 80% of the time. I can get great lather every time using a synthetic brush but I have tried using a boar brush many times and recently a silvertip badger brush and I just cannot get half the lather I get with a synthetic brush.
Does anyone else have this same experience.

My history with shave sticks is limited.  
My Road Warrior is a Mystic Water shave stick, which I carry and use with an original L'Occitaine Plisson synthetic brush when I am traveling by commercial airline.   (The Mystic Water shave stick is fully acceptable as carry-on baggage in all jurisdictions.)   The Mystic Water shave stick lathers well with the Plisson, obviously.

I also have used the Mystic Water shave stick at home, lathering with a Semogue SOC two-band badger brush (which has much more backbone than the Plisson), and the Semogue complemented it as well as the Plisson does.

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 12-23-2018, 05:58 AM
#6
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(12-22-2018, 10:12 PM)Mel S Meles Wrote:
(12-22-2018, 05:20 PM)shave/brush Wrote: I love using shave sticks to make lather. In fact I use sticks 80% of the time. I can get great lather every time using a synthetic brush but I have tried using a boar brush many times and recently a silvertip badger brush and I just cannot get half the lather I get with a synthetic brush.
Does anyone else have this same experience.

My history with shave sticks is limited.  
My Road Warrior is a Mystic Water shave stick, which I carry and use with an original L'Occitaine Plisson synthetic brush when I am traveling by commercial airline.   (The Mystic Water shave stick is fully acceptable as carry-on baggage in all jurisdictions.)   The Mystic Water shave stick lathers well with the Plisson, obviously.

I also have used the Mystic Water shave stick at home, lathering with a Semogue SOC two-band badger brush (which has much more backbone than the Plisson), and the Semogue complemented it as well as the Plisson does.

So you do just as well with a badger as you do with synthetics. 
After the La Toja stick Mystic Water is my first choice also.

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 12-23-2018, 09:54 AM
#7
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I guess after my new badger brush breaks in a little I'll try a stick again and apply plenty of soap. I thought I already put a lot on but who knows.

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 12-23-2018, 10:07 AM
#8
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Synthetic brushes facilitate the lathering process, but I can great lather using any brush as I just spend a bit more time generating the lather when using my large badger brushes. 

Ron, I would suggest applying more soap, water and time with the stick when using non-synthetic brushes. 
Good luck.  Shy

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 12-23-2018, 11:19 AM
#9
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(12-23-2018, 10:07 AM)celestino Wrote: Synthetic brushes facilitate the lathering process, but I can great lather using any brush as I just spend a bit more time generating the lather when using my large badger brushes. 

Ron, I would suggest applying more soap, water and time with the stick when using non-synthetic brushes. 
Good luck.  Shy

Well all you guys that use a boar with a stick can't wrong. I will have to try it again and take your advice. More soap, water and time.

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 12-23-2018, 12:45 PM
#10
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Some items just match more naturally with people's regular techniques. 

I've found that with the various brush hairs available there are some general rules. 

Synthetic hairs - They absorb no water or soap, so they take the least amount of product (soap or cream) and water to build up an amazing lather. 

Badger brushes - I'm lumping them all together, but there are obviously differences. They use more product and water (than synthetic brushes) to build a great lather, but they offer greater variation in face feel and backbone.

Boar brushes - These 'eat' lather. That means they use even more product and water to produce a good stable lather. They are every bit as capable of producing a great lather as the others, but you have to adjust your technique to account for their peculiarities.

What does this mean for the shave stick question posed by the OP?

It's pretty simple. Most people use shave sticks by rubbing them on the face and then building a lather based on the amount of product applied. Since synthetic brushes eat the least lather, they provide copious amounts of lather with just one application of soap, and can provide lather for a comfortable 3+ pass shave. A badger will come close to doing the same, but a boar brush requires one to apply more soap to the face for each pass (within reason).

That's my experience with these brushes. This will vary for different users. I like them all and use them all for face lathering.

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 12-23-2018, 12:53 PM
#11
  • evnpar
  • Emeritus
  • Portland, Oregon
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(12-23-2018, 12:45 PM)yohannrjm Wrote: Some items just match more naturally with people's regular techniques. 

I've found that with the various brush hairs available there are some general rules. 

Synthetic hairs - They absorb no water or soap, so they take the least amount of product (soap or cream) and water to build up an amazing lather. 

Badger brushes - I'm lumping them all together, but there are obviously differences. They use more product and water (than synthetic brushes) to build a great lather, but they offer greater variation in face feel and backbone.

Boar brushes - These 'eat' lather. That means they use even more product and water to produce a good stable lather. They are every bit as capable of producing a great lather as the others, but you have to adjust your technique to account for their peculiarities.

What does this mean for the shave stick question posed by the OP?

It's pretty simple. Most people use shave sticks by rubbing them on the face and then building a lather based on the amount of product applied. Since synthetic brushes eat the least lather, they provide copious amounts of lather with just one application of soap, and can provide lather for a comfortable 3+ pass shave. A badger will come close to doing the same, but a boar brush requires one to apply more soap to the face for each pass (within reason).

That's my experience with these brushes. This will vary for different users. I like them all and use them all for face lathering.

+1

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 12-23-2018, 01:15 PM
#12
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(12-23-2018, 12:53 PM)evnpar Wrote:
(12-23-2018, 12:45 PM)yohannrjm Wrote: Some items just match more naturally with people's regular techniques. 

I've found that with the various brush hairs available there are some general rules. 

Synthetic hairs - They absorb no water or soap, so they take the least amount of product (soap or cream) and water to build up an amazing lather. 

Badger brushes - I'm lumping them all together, but there are obviously differences. They use more product and water (than synthetic brushes) to build a great lather, but they offer greater variation in face feel and backbone.

Boar brushes - These 'eat' lather. That means they use even more product and water to produce a good stable lather. They are every bit as capable of producing a great lather as the others, but you have to adjust your technique to account for their peculiarities.

What does this mean for the shave stick question posed by the OP?

It's pretty simple. Most people use shave sticks by rubbing them on the face and then building a lather based on the amount of product applied. Since synthetic brushes eat the least lather, they provide copious amounts of lather with just one application of soap, and can provide lather for a comfortable 3+ pass shave. A badger will come close to doing the same, but a boar brush requires one to apply more soap to the face for each pass (within reason).

That's my experience with these brushes. This will vary for different users. I like them all and use them all for face lathering.

+1

+2

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 12-23-2018, 02:15 PM
#13
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(12-23-2018, 01:15 PM)49erShaver Wrote:
(12-23-2018, 12:53 PM)evnpar Wrote:
(12-23-2018, 12:45 PM)yohannrjm Wrote: Some items just match more naturally with people's regular techniques. 

I've found that with the various brush hairs available there are some general rules. 

Synthetic hairs - They absorb no water or soap, so they take the least amount of product (soap or cream) and water to build up an amazing lather. 

Badger brushes - I'm lumping them all together, but there are obviously differences. They use more product and water (than synthetic brushes) to build a great lather, but they offer greater variation in face feel and backbone.

Boar brushes - These 'eat' lather. That means they use even more product and water to produce a good stable lather. They are every bit as capable of producing a great lather as the others, but you have to adjust your technique to account for their peculiarities.

What does this mean for the shave stick question posed by the OP?

It's pretty simple. Most people use shave sticks by rubbing them on the face and then building a lather based on the amount of product applied. Since synthetic brushes eat the least lather, they provide copious amounts of lather with just one application of soap, and can provide lather for a comfortable 3+ pass shave. A badger will come close to doing the same, but a boar brush requires one to apply more soap to the face for each pass (within reason).

That's my experience with these brushes. This will vary for different users. I like them all and use them all for face lathering.

+1

+2

+a tub of soap

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 12-23-2018, 02:42 PM
#14
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Seems like a good summary. So I guess if I apply more soap my badger brush and even my boar brush should work with a shave stick for me.

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 12-23-2018, 04:31 PM
#15
  • pbrmhl
  • Senior Member
  • Seattle
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(12-22-2018, 06:33 PM)shave/brush Wrote:
(12-22-2018, 06:06 PM)pbrmhl Wrote: I'm the opposite. I can use my Irisch Moos shave stick to face lather just fine with my badgers, but just can't do it with my synths. I haven't yet tried one of my boars, but my experience is discouraging, as I only use synths on the road, which is when a stick is most convenient. We're all different!

What happens when you use a synthetic with a stick?

Water drips everywhere. It seems badger (and boar) absorbs water much better than synth, so when I add water to the synth, it doesn’t seem to absorb. I just make a mess. I have the same problem face-lathering generally with a synth.

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 12-23-2018, 04:38 PM
#16
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(12-23-2018, 04:31 PM)pbrmhl Wrote:
(12-22-2018, 06:33 PM)shave/brush Wrote:
(12-22-2018, 06:06 PM)pbrmhl Wrote: I'm the opposite. I can use my Irisch Moos shave stick to face lather just fine with my badgers, but just can't do it with my synths. I haven't yet tried one of my boars, but my experience is discouraging, as I only use synths on the road, which is when a stick is most convenient. We're all different!

What happens when you use a synthetic with a stick?

Water drips everywhere. It seems badger (and boar) absorbs water much better than synth, so when I add water to the synth, it doesn’t seem to absorb. I just make a mess. I have the same problem face-lathering generally with a synth.

I just shake out the excess water and it works just fine. Better than fine.

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 12-23-2018, 04:47 PM
#17
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(12-23-2018, 04:31 PM)pbrmhl Wrote:
(12-22-2018, 06:33 PM)shave/brush Wrote:
(12-22-2018, 06:06 PM)pbrmhl Wrote: I'm the opposite. I can use my Irisch Moos shave stick to face lather just fine with my badgers, but just can't do it with my synths. I haven't yet tried one of my boars, but my experience is discouraging, as I only use synths on the road, which is when a stick is most convenient. We're all different!

What happens when you use a synthetic with a stick?

Water drips everywhere. It seems badger (and boar) absorbs water much better than synth, so when I add water to the synth, it doesn’t seem to absorb. I just make a mess. I have the same problem face-lathering generally with a synth.

Yep, synthetics do not absorb water at all. What I do when I use them for face lathering is that I rinse them in warm water (they don't need to be soaked), then I shake off most of the water and apply the shave stick to the face as usual, and start building the lather. Since I start with very little water in the brush it is initially pretty gummy. Then I dip only the tips of the brush in water and build lather as usual. The body of the knot doesn't hold any water, so it's pointless to keep it wet. 

This works well for me with modern synthetic brushes - Muhle STF, Simpson and Plisson. There will still be some flinging of the lather as the hairs have so much spring to them. I've not figured out how to avoid this, but the Simpson seems to be the least prone to this.

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 12-23-2018, 04:56 PM
#18
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I find that my synthetic brushes do hold water. What I do when using sticks is I get them full with water and give them one good snap of the wrist to get out the excess I don't want. Then I take it to my face and make the lather.
For the second pass there is still plenty of water and soap in the brush to use. It out performs boar or badger for me every time.

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 12-23-2018, 06:27 PM
#19
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(12-23-2018, 04:56 PM)shave/brush Wrote: I find that my synthetic brushes do hold water. What I do when using sticks is I get them full with water and give them one good snap of the wrist to get out the excess I don't want. Then I take it to my face and make the lather.
For the second pass there is still plenty of water and soap in the brush to use. It out performs boar or badger for me every time.

This is understandable - as you aren’t practiced with boar & badger. Synthetics are easier for you because that’s what you are most experienced with. As I mentioned in another thread, just spend some time getting to know your boar/badger on its own terms.

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 12-23-2018, 06:32 PM
#20
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(12-23-2018, 06:27 PM)mike_the_kraken Wrote:
(12-23-2018, 04:56 PM)shave/brush Wrote: I find that my synthetic brushes do hold water. What I do when using sticks is I get them full with water and give them one good snap of the wrist to get out the excess I don't want. Then I take it to my face and make the lather.
For the second pass there is still plenty of water and soap in the brush to use. It out performs boar or badger for me every time.

This is understandable - as you aren’t practiced with boar & badger. Synthetics are easier for you because that’s what you are most experienced with. As I mentioned in another thread, just spend some time getting to know your boar/badger on its own terms.

I am going to try my badger again on Monday and see what happens. I will load extra soap. I only used it twice but it seems softer now also.

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