02-04-2019, 08:53 AM
#1
  • Barrylu
  • Senior Member
  • Portland OR
User Info
I have received a number of very nice comments about some essays I have written for my grandchildren. I hope you enjoy this one. The essay describes some of my experiences growing up in Brooklyn in the 1940s. Please note this essay like the others is also copyrighted material and as such is prohibited to be disseminated without the author's permission. Enjoy

Growing up in Brooklyn 1937 to 1950

I was born on Empire Blvd in Brooklyn in 1937. My family moved to Eastern Parkway and Utica Avenue when I was very young. My memories as a child are from Eastern Parkway. That is, except for one memory. My first memory is lying in my crib, smelling sour milk and staring up at a mobile. The mobile had a blue and white wooden bird and metal baby birds flying around the Bluebird. I told my mother about this memory and she had a shocked look on her face. She said, that the mobile was originally purchased and used by my older brother David. The baby birds were tin and had rusted. She threw the Mobile out when we moved to Eastern Parkway. I was less than 6 months old when we moved.

Living on Eastern Parkway we were one of the first families to own a telephone. We were rich compared to my friends and neighbors. My father earned $65 a week. Most of the people on the block earned $50 a week or less. This extra $15 a week enabled us certain luxuries. For instance, we had a telephone and ate out every Wednesday night. Most Wednesday nights we could be found at Ling Num Gardens Chinese restaurant. My friends never ate in a restaurant until they were in their late teens and were bringing home a paycheck.

Growing up in Brooklyn was very similar to growing up in a small town. When not in school we were out on the street playing. Boys would play Sculley, Bang Bang, Territory, Ring -O - Leaveo, Hide and Seek, Box Ball, Stoop ball and Stick Ball among others. The girls played Potsey, Jump Rope, and would bounce a rubber ball and cross their leg over the ball while reciting a rhyme. We thought we basically had no parental supervision. However, every adult on the block was watching us all the time. This is the point of the comment about us having one of the few phones on our block and the block operating as a small town. We lived in a rear facing apartment in a tenement. That is, my mother could not look out the window and see if either my brother or I were getting into any trouble. However, it did not seem to make a difference. As soon as we acted up The Mother's Network became active. My mother would suddenly appear and take the appropriate action. I never quite understood how the network functioned given that there were no telephones and only Dick Tracy had a cell phone.

Finally, lest you think I am bragging about my Father's large salary, let me end this narrative with another memory. This memory also reinforces my statement of our block being a small town. We had a restaurant on the corner named Dubrows. The owner was a man named George Dubrow. Mr. Dubrow was a man of short stature and a big heart. It was Thanksgiving. Me and my brother David were playing in the street. Mr. Dubrow approached us and led us into the kitchen of his restaurant. I remember I was sitting in a high chair with a napkin around my neck and holding a huge turkey leg in my hand. David was sitting at a table eating a traditional Thanksgiving meal on a plate. The kitchen staff were making a "big deal" over me and my brother. I was as happy as could be. I looked up and saw my mother standing in the doorway crying. I couldn't understand why she was crying . Years later I came to find out my father had lost his job. The family was broke and probably through the Mother's Network Mr. Dubrow had learned about my families need.

98 1,241
Reply
 02-04-2019, 09:02 AM
#2
User Info
Great story.  I'm wondering about your memory of the mobile that goes back to you being 6 months old.  Do you think that maybe you saw a picture of yourself in the crib looking up at the mobile and transformed that picture into a memory?  I only say that because I too thought I remembered helping my father touch up his Renault with some touch up paint in the car port when we lived in Florida.  I was born there and we lived there until I was 2.  Years later I realized that we had a picture of me kneeling next to my father as he did exactly as I "remembered".  I guess it's possible that I did have a memory of that event but I question my own recollection as I don't have any other memories from when I was that young.  Thanks for your well written historical interlude.

2 316
Reply
 02-04-2019, 09:08 AM
#3
  • nikos.a
  • Senior Member
  • Athens, Greece
User Info
Very nice, Barry!


Out of curiosity, how an essay like this posted on a forum can be copyrighted? How is this possible in your case?

I'm asking because we all make reviews of products or upload photos. Does this mean that my writings and my photos, not only the shaving related, are copyrighted and if anyone is using them I could ask some kind of compensation? 
I'm really curious.

60 2,606
Reply
 02-04-2019, 09:09 AM
#4
  • Barrylu
  • Senior Member
  • Portland OR
User Info
I know it's weird but true. I didn't even know that I wasn't born in the apartment we lived in until I was 17 years old

98 1,241
Reply
 02-04-2019, 09:40 AM
#5
  • Barrylu
  • Senior Member
  • Portland OR
User Info
The original essays were published in a book. The book was then published and copyrighted.
[Image: 5vnKm3j.jpg][Image: XKeLgtK.jpg]

98 1,241
Reply
 02-04-2019, 11:31 AM
#6
User Info
Keep em coming!

6 437
Reply
 02-04-2019, 11:53 AM
#7
  • Barrylu
  • Senior Member
  • Portland OR
User Info
There is a third essay on the TSN Home Page

98 1,241
Reply
 02-05-2019, 04:14 AM
#8
User Info
Thx for the time travel!


Gesendet von iPad mit Tapatalk

0 284
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)