02-13-2019, 12:16 PM
#21
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
User Info
(02-11-2019, 06:39 AM)MntnMan62 Wrote: I use olive oil instead of butter because it's healthier and has a more distinct flavor.

Quote:I think that the current practice is to follow such an assertion with a disclaimer, The FDA has not evaluated this statement.

You were correct to point out my faux pas relating to it being "healthier".  It is healthier than butter ...

I am not sure that there is consensus on even the latter point. The debate centers on transformations that happen at or near the smoke point, and at what stage various oils start to break down into nasties.  But such discussions are way above my pay grade, so I step out of the fray at the point of noting the absence of consensus, well before I step into the mire of offering a conclusion.

1 1,352
Reply
 02-13-2019, 02:32 PM
#22
User Info
Actually there is a consensus and it doesn't involve high temp's ...

Butter is a saturated fat and sat' fat  promotes the liver to overproduce LDL bad cholesterol. Mono and poly unsaturated fats don't do that and instead promote an elevation of the HDL good cholesterol.

By strictly limiting my ingested cholesterol and sat' fats (good bye all the foods we so love!), and using mono and poly unsaturated fats I have gotten my LDL/HDL blood numbers from 140ish/80ish to 43/72 on Sept' 1, 2018. My Dr told me that folks would kill to get those numbers, but it didn't happen without work. Basically, if it tastes good and I didn't cook it, spit it out. A few exceptions... if it is produced in an establishment that cooks things to order I should be OK with the fish or beef cuts without marbling (filet mignon), absolutely nothing fried (yada, yada, the list goes on).

Sodium is another subject, but important for those who eat for the heart. Check the nutrition labels on prepackaged foods, to include anything not made by you. My intake was easily 3000mg and higher daily. Now it's (some days) below 200mg. But it can't be done with factory made foods that use sodium as a flavor enhancer instead of making tasty food with actual flavor. Read nutrition labels and serving sizes; you'll be amazed at the poison that we eat once we learn what the body actually requires. I regularly give away foods in the larder that I can no longer consume.

Back to the subject.

I still like the egg poaching cups, I just need to learn the timing to get the eggs that I want.

I like that the ones I purchased and used unbleached packaging. I'm no tree hugger, but doing without a manufacturing step (bleaching with Cl and CLO2) is a step in the right direction. I don't need white packaging, just packaging that gets the product to me w/o damage.

32 6,566
Reply
 03-03-2019, 12:33 PM
#23
User Info
(02-09-2019, 07:02 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote:
(02-09-2019, 06:45 AM)Rory1262 Wrote: Stir the water and pour the egg into the vortex. No gadget necessary.

I love Crab Cake Benedict and Smoked Salmon Benedict.

Dittos, but not everyone can do that. I have seen chefs who couldn't do it.

It helps if the egg is really fresh.

0 286
Reply
 03-07-2019, 12:43 PM
#24
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
User Info
Poached eggs are my absolute favourite, but I have yet to replicate the poached eggs from a good restaurant. Mine are usually over cooked. I am thinking of trying the modified sous vide method: cooking in the shell in water at 167*F for 12 minutes followed by a 1 minute ice water bath. Anyone tried this?

9 1,088
Reply
 03-07-2019, 01:14 PM
#25
User Info
I haven't but I know of someone who swears by SV eggs. What you suggest is the ATK method and they generally know their stuff. Eggs are inexpensive, try it.

They also had a method that used steam (in the shell) and it worked fine. But think I can remember it now? No. I just googled "steamed eggs". Easy to find.

OK, I just remembered the ATK steam method googling brought it back to me.

Just 1/4- 1/2" of boiling water and the eggs in the shell, no steam basket required since the steam carries more heat than the boiling water. 6 Minutes for soft boiled for a large egg. I wouldn't do more than a single layer of eggs in the pot.

I have been trying the sili' cups and so far either my eggs are too small (I can't convince the birds to lay bigger eggs) or I'm doing it wrong. Next time I'm going down to 5 minutes to get a decent runny yolk.

32 6,566
Reply
 03-07-2019, 01:39 PM
#26
User Info
(03-07-2019, 12:43 PM)Rufus Wrote: Poached eggs are my absolute favourite, but I have yet to replicate the poached eggs from a good restaurant.  Mine are usually over cooked.  I am thinking of trying the modified sous vide method: cooking in the shell in water at 167*F for 12 minutes followed by a 1 minute ice water bath.  Anyone tried this?


This reminds me of the Japanese onsen tamago (hot spring eggs). If you don't happen to have a hot spring handy in which to put your eggs (still in the shell), you can do it this way.

https://www.justonecookbook.com/onsen-tamago/

As the article notes, it comes out different from a regular soft-boiled egg.

10 1,087
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)