02-27-2019, 06:56 PM
#1
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Interesting concept - I’ve never seen one in person. These are (or at least were) commonly available in Japan. From the sales ad:

Fight facial hair each morning with Samauri stealth with these 4/8 disposable straight razors from Kai. Constructed of stamped steel, which clamps the blade in place. Ideal for travel or to give as a unique gift.

[Image: KAI-LGA-5HI-b_1024x1024.jpg?v=1479498127]
[Image: 16320d1224145701-kai-disposable-straight...osable.jpg]

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 02-28-2019, 07:08 AM
#2
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I saw these the last time I was in Japan a couple of years ago and bought a pack just out of curiosity. I gave a couple away and still have a couple left.
For their extreme lightness, they handle pretty well. I enjoyed shaving with them.
I have a hunch that they're meant for and mainly used by people with very sparse, light facial hear.
According to my wife, that includes women!

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 02-28-2019, 07:11 AM
#3
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This also reminds me of something that puzzled me for a while.
From the forums, I'd seen the word kamisori used in the very narrow sense of Japanese traditional straight razors.
I heard my in-laws using it in the basic (broader) sense, which is a razor of any kind.

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 03-05-2019, 09:43 AM
#4
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I think women use these to get rid of fine, light-colored hairs that are mostly found on the upper part of the cheek area.  

My wife uses an electric trimmer to accomplish the same thing.  I know that there are salons in Japan that offer straight-razor clean-ups to women all the time.  



The word kamisori derives from two Japanese kanji:  the first one ("kami") means hair and the second one ("sori") means to cut.  Soru is the root verb for "to cut."

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 03-05-2019, 01:04 PM
#5
  • Mel S Meles
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(02-28-2019, 07:11 AM)Rory1262 Wrote: This also reminds me of something that puzzled me for a while.
From the forums, I'd seen the word kamisori used in the very narrow sense of Japanese traditional straight razors.
I heard my in-laws using it in the basic (broader) sense, which is a razor of any kind.

かみ kami in Japanese is the general term for hair; そる soru is the verb, “cut” or “shave.”  (There is no Japanese equivalent to the English infinitive form of a verb.)   Kamisori, in Japanese, simply means something made to cut hair.   (After I had posted this message, I noticed that Kingfisher had beat me to the explanation a couple of hours earlier in the final paragraph of the preceding message; I apologize for the redundancy.]

Words change when they are adopted by non-native speakers.  Until the second half of the 1960s, ramen was known, even in Tokyo, as a hot noodle dish and as a regional specialty of the northern island of Hokkaido; in the mid-1960s, there actually was a nightly Japan Air Lines freight flight of cooked ramen from Sapporo to Tokyo for distribution to ramen specialty shops in Tokyo.  (If you want to know more, yr obdnt srvnt provided some more history in my tripadvisor.com review of the tiny — six stool —Hirano ramen shop in Kamakura:  search for the review titled When it comes to ramen shops ...)  But by the end of the 1960s, Nissin (inventor of Cup Noodle) had successfully commercialized and widely distributed a dry packaged version of noodles.  (In Japanese, めん men, means noodle:  there are many varieties of -men, and the phrase “ramen noodles” is redundant.)  The dry packaged ramen variety of Nissin dry noodles became an instant (no pun intended) hit in American college dormitories and homeless camps, imprinting forever the American concept of what ramen means.  

The same may have happened to the lesser-known tern kamisori among North American shavers.

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 03-05-2019, 01:31 PM
#6
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"Panko bread crumbs" is another redundant phrase!

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 03-06-2019, 03:57 PM
#7
  • blzrfn
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I picked up a five pack of these out of curiosity and did not enjoy shaving with one, it was not ergonomic at all.  I do find them handy for squaring up my sideburns and keeping the uni-brow from forming.  The blade is quite good, assuming it is just a Kai "Artist Club" blade, but the handle is not my cup of tea.

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 03-07-2019, 05:15 AM
#8
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(03-06-2019, 03:57 PM)blzrfn Wrote: I picked up a five pack of these out of curiosity and did not enjoy shaving with one, it was not ergonomic at all.  I do find them handy for squaring up my sideburns and keeping the uni-brow from forming.  The blade is quite good, assuming it is just a Kai "Artist Club" blade, but the handle is not my cup of tea.


It's probably best to go into using this product with the idea that it's meant for cleanup/touch-up on small spots, as opposed to full-on shaves.
In retrospect, that's how I would have approached it.

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