03-07-2019, 12:33 PM
#1
  • RyznRio
  • Active Member
  • Connecticut
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This came up in an earlier post and I was wondering if anyone here cooks from scratch?

I or my wife cook 98% of the time. Eating out is a social affair and we would prefer to cook for our friends and have a nice dinner at our place but that seems to make folks uncomfortable as they dont want to cook to reciprocate.

we read labels carefully and only choose products that have ingredients that we recognize and can pronounce. when we cant find something we make it ourselves eg ice cream currently every brand has gum in the ice cream but gum is a substitute for cream. a poor substitute at that. add in stabilizers and other chemicals for most brands. so we bought an ice cream maker and surprise best ice cream ever with only milk cream sugar and a flavor, vanilla is organic, chocolate is hershey's cocoa other brands are dutch processed which means treated with alkali so it dissolves better. i dont want to eat alkali i want to eat chocolate. currently ice cream machines (cuisinart) are about $50 and no more salt etc.

anyway i could go down the list of ice cream flavors and the simplicity of other dishes we make but everybody loves ice cream (sorry lactose intolerants) and very few make their own.  

so I'm wondering do any other gents or ladies read labels and choose to make their own if a commercial brand has too many chemicals to be called food. of course YMMV

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 03-07-2019, 01:00 PM
#2
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
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We eat out once a week at the most and we prepare all our other meals at home from scratch avoiding processed foods at all costs. Twice a month we have friends in for dinner, usually 2 couples, and again all 3 courses are prepared by us from scratch; none of our friends seem to be uncomfortable reciprocating with a dinner cooked in their home. Although I’m not lactose intolerant I don’t like ice cream and for that matter I don’t like drinking milk, but I do like cream in my coffee. I think my aversion to ice cream and milk is due to the scarcity of fresh milk and dairy in general when I was a child. We had to drink either powdered milk (Klim) or milk that was heat processed and preserved in sealed bottles; both were pretty disgusting and to this day milk and most milk products don’t appeal to me.

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 03-07-2019, 01:30 PM
#3
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I absolutely cook 99% of the food we consume from scratch. I allow myself one serving of pizza per month, that's it for food that others cook for me.  Since I now have heart disease I live by nutrition labels. Any ingredients I buy must be low sodium, low sat' fat, and cholesterol. I try to keep my daily sodium below 200mg and definitely below 500mg. Last night I had to eat some chips to get the 200mg of sodium. At last blood test my LDL/HDL was 43/72. My Dr told me that some folks would kill to have those numbers.

I allow myself 2 eggs /week and 1 small serving/week of a fried meat product that goes with the eggs. If I eat those eggs over 2 days I don't get another serving of the meat, just one.

Cooking foods w/o sodium and fat is a completely different way of cooking and to have it taste good, but it can be done. I absolutely will NOT eat food that isn't tasty.

I make sorbet for my frozen treat... no butterfat, just 2 ingredients; frozen fruit and corn syrup. Currently I have blueberry sorbet from our bushes in the freezer. So far for Raspberry, strawberry, or blueberry the recipe is the same, 1 lb frozen berries and 3/4 cup corn syrup. It goes into the Vita-Mix and I use the tamping rod to push things down into the blades. without a tamping rod it wouldn't work.

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 03-16-2019, 02:09 PM
#4
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From scratch, close to 100%.


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 03-16-2019, 03:06 PM
#5
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me and my wife will occasionally make our own ice cream though I cannot seem to make it right.  It always comes out rock hard.

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 03-16-2019, 05:19 PM
#6
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Scratch!  Absolutely.  I know of no other way to control the contents of your food AND it tastes so much better.  I travel too much and must of necessity eat restaurant food.  It disgusts me that so many restaurants don't cook from scratch and don't apologize for it.  Dang dude! I give you "scratch-made" money and you pop the top off a no. 10 can and throw something in the microwave?  How the crap do you get great reviews.  Americas tongue is broken.  

I'm always grateful to get home to my knives, pans, pots, and pantry.  Scratch!

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 03-16-2019, 05:24 PM
#7
  • RyznRio
  • Active Member
  • Connecticut
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(03-16-2019, 03:06 PM)asiliski Wrote: me and my wife will occasionally make our own ice cream though I cannot seem to make it right.  It always comes out rock hard.
add a little vodka to the mix.

1 to 2 Tbs should do it.

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 03-16-2019, 05:39 PM
#8
  • garyg
  • Senior Member
  • Great Lakes
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I've been trending this way for a bit .. if you do just "regular food" stuff - aka, meat, veggies, grains .. you can do it pretty easily.  Ice cream I gave up, but you can train to substitute almost anything if you have a little grit ..

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 04-22-2019, 12:59 AM
#9
  • Mouser
  • Senior Member
  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
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I haven't had anything  completely from scratch  since my grandparents, who were from Sicily and Italy, passed away. I'm  talking pasta sauce  pasta, sausage  and meatballs, vegetables from the ground up.  The only short cuts since coming here was that the meat was bought from a butcher.  But my wife cooks from what constitutes scratch nowadays regularly.  Not daily but regularly.

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 04-22-2019, 01:07 AM
#10
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From scratch when I know how Wink

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 04-22-2019, 06:15 AM
#11
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Love to cook here.  Been doing a lot more of it lately.  I'd say I'm cooking about 50% of the time.  I made some scalloped potatoes yesterday for Easter dinner.  Potatoes, butter, flour, milk, cheddar cheese.  That's its.  And made some brussels sprouts to go with the Ham the wife bought.  All I did with the brussels sprouts was to pan sear them flat side down in olive oil in a cast iron pan and then once nicely browned, threw in some garlic cloves, balsamic vinegar and honey and continued to cook them for a while until tender.  I'll probably cook more and more the older I get.  It's enjoyable and I know how I like my food cooked.

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 04-22-2019, 07:48 AM
#12
  • Garb
  • Active Member
  • Oregon
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I cringe at the thought of having a stranger touching my food. We do most all of our cooking at the house. Mostly Asian recipes with lots of veggies, fish and/or pork.  I used to eat more ice cream than I do now, which is almost never. I just find it clogs my veins up too much. LOL

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 04-22-2019, 08:31 AM
#13
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Garb, I find that sorbet is easy to make, delicious, and fills the frozen treat craving just dandy.

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 05-20-2019, 03:29 AM
#14
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One more reason to cook from scratch with fresh things:

https://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/ful...19)30248-7


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 05-20-2019, 06:22 AM
#15
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I just need to mention this...

Every time I see this topic "cook from scratch" I can't help but think that it's the only way to actually cook. Everything else is just warming something up and to my way of thinking not cooking at all. Someone else cooked it. Who can't light the oven, throw something in, and set a timer? Or put it in the microwave? How did we get to the point where warming something precooked became "cooking"?

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 05-20-2019, 09:40 AM
#16
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(05-20-2019, 06:22 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: I just need to mention this...

Every time I see this topic "cook from scratch" I can't help but think that it's the only way to actually cook. Everything else is just warming something up and to my way of thinking not cooking at all. Someone else cooked it. Who can't light the oven, throw something in, and set a timer? Or put it in the microwave? How did we get to the point where warming something precooked became "cooking"?

So true.

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 05-21-2019, 07:28 AM
#17
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Well I’m a die hard gastro geek head and even though I live in downtown Copenhagen, with literally 100’s of restaurants, fast food shops and pizza/sharwarma shops, I make my own food from scratch every day, except when I’m served food made by some of the professional chefs I know.

I’m still perfecting my skills as an enthusiast level home amateur chef and still have a lot to learn.
I grew up watching my mother cook daily and have learned a lot from her.
My big brother is also into serious cooking.

I started going into cooking on a serious enthusiast level in early 2016, and my goal is to keep improving my cooking skills, so I can make high quality dishes on a constant basis, meal after meal.

I’m not there yet. If my physical shape allows it, my goal is to continue to cook and continue to learn and perfect my skills until I’m in my 80’s or even 90’s, if god allows me to live for so long.

I’m in my late 40’s now.

I don’t make my own pasta nor noodles though, but other than that I make everything from scratch.

I’m also convinced, that great cookware makes my personal cooking journey so much more fun and interesting.

A good chef can cook a great meal in almost any kind of cheap cookware.
However why drive in a Skoda, if you can drive in a Bentley ?

So since really getting into serious cooking, I have upgraded my cookware setup to the best of the best.

I’m now the lucky owner of a whole range of Mauviel M250c, De Buyer Inocuivre and Falk 2.5 copper pans and pots, because cooking in thick copper just is so much more pleasing and fun and effective.

I sear meat in my thick De Buyer Carbon steal pans.

I also upgraded my kitchen knives to Miyabi Artisan, Yaxell Gou and Wüsthof Classic Ikon. I use a range of Naniwa Chosera whetstones to sharpen my own knives.

I’m saving up for a $100.000 Molteni range.

But still cooking is not about the gear.
Great chefs can cook in just about any cheap pan.

I mostly cook a fusion of danish, french and Italian. But I also find my inspiration in Thai food.

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 05-21-2019, 07:42 AM
#18
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
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Since retiring many years ago I’ve developed a strong interest in cooking; nothing gastro geekish, just plain, straightforward, healthy, tasty meals. As my knowledge and skills have improved I’ve branched into tagines and curries. I still have problems cooking fish for some reason; I can’t get satisfactory texture or flavour. Right now we’re renovating our kitchen and will add new major appliances to replace the ones we’ve had for over 20 years. I don’t think these appliances will exponentially improve my overall cooking, but they should make the process more enjoyable...hopefully.

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 05-21-2019, 12:27 PM
#19
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Rufus, we got a new stove maybe a decade ago when we converted the kitchen to gas*, and it was a piece of manure. I hated it and had nothing but problems from day one. Then it finally gave up the ghost after not many years (good riddance to bad garbage!). I found a high end pro' stove for the homeowner (Blue Star from PA, same factory that Garland was made in) that could fit in the built in space and the difference in my mental being has been night and day as has been the performance of the stove. That just has to translate into the food. I wish you well with your new appliances.

*FWIW, we also changed out the cooktop and the first one had some glaring safety issues. I mentioned them to the retailer and Bosch had an updated one shipped to us and installed pretty quickly. Not pro' quality but we work it hard and it performs.

FWIW, they are all gas which I highly recommend if you have access to that fuel. We had an electric kitchen and frankly... well, we went to gas for cooking after using electric for 3 decades (it's the pits IMO). Not so critical for the stove, but night and day different for the cooktop. Gas is great for rural users since there is no such thing as a "power outage" on the propane tanks. Probably the same thing for city users of natural gas.

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 05-21-2019, 01:51 PM
#20
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
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(05-21-2019, 12:27 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Rufus, we got a new stove maybe a decade ago when we converted the kitchen to gas*, and it was a piece of manure. I hated it and had nothing but problems from day one. Then it finally gave up the ghost after not many years (good riddance to bad garbage!). I found a high end pro' stove for the homeowner (Blue Star from PA, same factory that Garland was made in) that could fit in the built in space and the difference in my mental being has been night and day as has been the performance of the stove. That just has to translate into the food. I wish you well with your new appliances.

*FWIW, we also changed out the cooktop and the first one had some glaring safety issues. I mentioned them to the retailer and Bosch had an updated one shipped to us and installed pretty quickly. Not pro' quality but we work it hard and it performs.

FWIW, they are all gas which I highly recommend if you have access to that fuel. We had an electric kitchen and frankly... well, we went to gas for cooking after using electric for 3 decades (it's the pits IMO). Not so critical for the stove, but night and day different for the cooktop. Gas is great for rural users since there is no such thing as a "power outage" on the propane tanks. Probably the same thing for city users of natural gas.

We went high-end: all Wolf, 5 burner gas cooktop, electric wall oven and electric warming drawer. I’d wanted a Wolf gas/electric range, but my wife wouldn’t have it. Our previous setup was a JennAir downdraft gas cooktop and electric wall oven; we couldn’t stand the JennAir downdraft, but we tolerated it for 20 years. I hope the Premium we paid for Wolf is worth it, but we did get it at 20% off; it looks good and everyone we know who has Wolf swear by it.

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