03-14-2012, 08:53 PM
#1
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I bet my experience mirrors that of many folks on the forum. I had razors tucked away in various places and I'd bring some out and put others away, always playing musical razors and frequently not having the razor of the day available and being forced to use something other. (How's that for a sentence!?)

I put another shelf in the medicine cabinet, but that was a stop gap measure at best and I quickly outgrew that.
[Image: DSC03272-1.jpg]

Anyway, for months I'd been looking for a suitable cabinet to house the implements used in the whisker wars, never finding what I wanted. Winter was beginning to wind down and when spring gets here that signals the end of inside work and the beginning of outside work. I didn't want to wait another 3/4 of a year for a solution. So I had to make a move. I decided to make something to my specs.

Here is that cabinet.

[Image: DSC03572small.jpg]

The carcase is made from solid Maine red oak, except for the back, so too are the frames of the doors. The door panels are Guatemalan oak veneer plywood from the home center. The carcase is fastened with bisquits and built while I waited for a Kreg jig to arrive. The doors are fastened with pocket hole joints made with the jig.

Edit: I just noticed in the pic that 2 of the pocket hole plugs can be seen in the left door in the upper and lower corners. Look for the diagonal "slashes" that don't blend into the grain on the inside of the open doors near the 45° miter joints. One at each mitered corner is easy, the others are more difficult to see.

The cabinet resides in the wasted space above the hopper.

This picture was taken today.

[Image: ShaveCabinet_4_2_12-1.jpg]

Gone are the days when I don't have the razor I want to use on that particular day immediately available.

The back is of the same Guatamalan oak veneer ply, heavily pickled, and while the picture may not show it, the grain can be seen through the heavy pickling. I was going to use white paint, but I like the pickling and it still gives the light colored back that I wanted.

Razor parts, spares, and whatnots are in the tackle boxes above.

The shelves are adjustable by just moving tiny brackets in the track.

Most of the scents haven't been used in years since my nose has a hard time with them anymore. Eventually I'll finish off the last splash of Old Spice and the Pierre Cardin. Eventually.

The razor stands are machined solid delrin rod that I've had in the shop for years. I just drilled a properly sized hole for each razor in the rod segment that extends not quite through the rod. I got that idea from the Feather SS razor. Behing the badger brushes you can just make out some blank stands that have just a pilot hole drilled in them, awaiting potential razors and the final fit.

To the left are my 5 DE razors, the rest are all SE. GEMs, EverReadys, and 2 Lather Catchers toward the left of the shelf (right of the eyedropper bottle of mineral oil razor lube). And the justification for the entire cabinet is the wifes Lady Gillette all the way to the right on the shelf. I threw her a bone just to hush her.

4 boar brushes and 4 badgers so that as I use them in order I'm not forced to use them on the same day of the week. I always use the brushes in order, each day I use any soap and any razor unless I'm experimenting or testing blades or some such. Then I can be "locked in", well, sort of anyway.

At this point if I buy nothing more I have enough IMO. Other than soaps. There are some more that I'd like to try. I have plenty of blades elsewhere.

The tiny shards of paper under a few razors? And the pencil? I keep tally marks on the blade wrapper under the razor that the blade resides in. Each time I use the blade I tally it to keep track. I try not to have more than 3 blades out at any one time, but even if I did, with this system I can keep track.

I think it cost me near $200 to build. The most expensive parts being the red oak and glass for the shelves. If I had used red oak veneer plywood for the carcase no one would have been the wiser and it would have been substantially less expensive (I would have known). I would have needed a small piece of the real stuff for the face frame on the cabinet and that's it.

The cabinet hangs on the wall by a system that I've been wanting to try for years. I have two pieces of 1/4 thick x 6" x the width of the cabinet aluminum plate. Each has a corresponding 45° angle cut on one long edge. When the one on the cabinet meets the one mounted on the wall it locks in place. The only thing keeping the cabinet on the wall is gravity. The more weight put into the cabinet the tighter it's held. Lift it up 1/4" and it's free to remove. Of course there would be one plate left on the wall. Unless the screws or the studs fail it's staying with the wall.

Update 2/21/13:

I'm doing this in this manner so as not to bump this thread to the top of the thread index.

The interior looks quite a bit different today, 2/21/13.

[Image: DSC03898cropped_zps6c4dedc8.jpg]

This proves that nature abhors a vacuum. If you build it it will fill up.

Not everythig in the cabinet can be seen. The 1912s are lined up so really only the first one can be seen. Some of the brushes are much like that as well. Too much gear, but as long as I have the room I don't see that changing any time soon.

Above the cabinet on the left, going up, is the "boneyard" of parts and old razors waiting either for repair or to be cannibalized. Then is "mothball storage" of good spare razors or razors waiting to be replated. Above that, the big storage box contains soaps/creams, and spare brushes. To the right, that big storage box contains Rolls Razor items, and misc' items. The papers above the storage box? My blade data from 1 1/2 years of testing blades.

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 03-14-2012, 08:59 PM
#2
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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Very nice! Do you take custom orders? Thumbup I could use a cabinet like that.

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 03-14-2012, 10:24 PM
#3
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Biggrin Well, thanks, but no. I'm not a professional cabinet maker. I'm just a duffer and far too slow. Besides, the time for indoor work is almost over and I'm building hanging wall cabinets for the shop now. Gotta finish those.

Besides, I'm retired and I really don't like committing to anything other than cocktails and dinner. I had far too many commitments when I was working and I've simply had enough of them. The problem is that I must meet my commitments so I accept few. Those that I do accept I make sure I meet. Cocktails and dinner, yup, that's good. BBQ too. I love BBQ (and grilling). But I digress.

You should be able to get the work done in CA though. Local is better anyway. At the very least it would cost a fortune to ship solid oak furniture across the country. Heck, anyone who can build a box can build a cabinet. The design is pretty simple. Just figure out your dimensions, take the pictures to a cabinet shop and I have no doubt they can make something better than mine that is uniquely yours.

My dimensions were 27x37x8 for the outside of the box and I used standard 3/4" stock. But your custom cabinet would be built to fit your space.

If I were to build another, I would build it out of all frame and panels, even the sides and top and bottom. That would reduce the weight substantially and would mean nothing for the strength of the cabinet since it holds little weight. It would be more labor though since it would involve far more joinery. But joinery is fun. Not so much fun if you're paying a cabinet shop by the hour. Again a custom cabinet is uniquely yours, you tell the shop what to build.

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 03-15-2012, 05:55 AM
#4
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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That is most impressive. I wish I had that talent.

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 03-15-2012, 06:46 AM
#5
  • Hanzo
  • Senior Member
  • Oakland, California
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Beautiful cabinet, excellent way to store gear.Smile

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 03-15-2012, 06:53 AM
#6
  • mikeperry
  • Senior Member
  • St Louis via the UK
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Hi

That's a very! nice looking cabinet, and the depth makes it extremely practical and useful Thumbup

Are the adjustable shelving system tracks fixed into a dado (routed groove) or surface mounted?

(03-14-2012, 08:53 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: The cabinet hangs on the wall by a system that I've been wanting to try for years. I have two pieces of 1/4 thick x 6" x the width of the cabinet aluminum plate. Each has a corresponding 45° angle cut on one long edge. When the one on the cabinet meets the one mounted on the wall it locks in place. The only thing keeping the cabinet on the wall is gravity. The more weight put into the cabinet the tighter it's held. Lift it up 1/4" and it's free to remove. Of course there would be one plate left on the wall. Unless the screws or the studs fail it's staying with the wall.

Not trying to come across as a know it all, but I believe that "system" is known as a French Cleat. I intend to use the exact same mounting system on the wall mounted shelves/display case I'm planning to build for my eldest sons bedroom.

Take care, Mike

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 03-15-2012, 07:19 AM
#7
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Mike, makes sense, there's pretty much nothing new in the world. It wouldn't surprise me one bit if I read about it years ago and the memory got lost in the grey cells, but the idea remained.

About the tracks... surface mounted. I didn't want to rout them in and weaken the sides, it also would have called for shorter screws and I didn't want to take any chance of having them coming through. It would have looked better in a picture if they had been routed, but it's really not a display cabinet, especially with the decision to not use glass panels in the doors. I put 6 tracks in it also. The other 2 mid mounted ones were for a possible 1/2 width shelf to use as a razor rack, but I didn't like the idea and went with the tiny stands instead. The rack actually wouldn't have held as many razors. Obviously I can still change my mind since nothing is carved in stone.
(03-15-2012, 05:55 AM)Johnny Wrote: That is most impressive. I wish I had that talent.

Johnny, you may not believe me, but I swear this is true. There is no talent on display there. You can do it, anyone can. You begin with the basics and go from there. Basically what you see is nothing more than a box with doors. Most all storage furniture is nothing more than building a box after it's been boiled down to the essence.

Especially with pocket hole joinery, anyone can build stuff. Layout is a little trickier because of the need to conceal the pocket holes, but the joinery itself is easy. Just make sure everything is cut right (square, etc) and it goes together so slick. You just can't get ahead of yourself. One step, complete it, then another, and when all the steps are done, so is the project. Sounds easy and it is. But you begin with simple projects and work up, after building the mental foundation.

When I lived in an apartment I had very few tools and I still built furniture. I would have a cabinet shop machine the parts and I would join them together and finish them in the apartment. So you CAN do it even with no tools and no place to work. An oak TV stand I built that way almost 40 years ago is still in use today. A store bought TV stand would have been trashed many years ago.

If you don't want to learn the steps from a book there is probably adult ed' at your local high school. Everyone there will be in the same boat so you won't stand out. I learned woodworking in school and that's what I'm discussing here. There's a difference in age, but no big deal. Another huge advantage of the adult ed' approach is that they have all of the tools, so you just show up with $ for materials and the course fee.

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 03-15-2012, 08:36 AM
#8
  • Sully
  • Moderator Emeritus
  • Cedar Park, Texas
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That's a great looking cabinet!

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 03-15-2012, 01:38 PM
#9
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B-E-A-Utiful!

Great work SD & thanks for sharing!

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 03-15-2012, 01:55 PM
#10
  • freddy
  • Senior Member
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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That is a fantastic piece of work. Enjoy it to the fullest! Smile

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 03-16-2012, 08:45 AM
#11
  • slantman
  • Expert Shaver
  • Leesburg, Florida
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Not too shabby more like incredible. The perfect solution to a guy with RAD.
Really unbelievable. Thanks for sharing.

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 03-16-2012, 11:45 AM
#12
  • mikeperry
  • Senior Member
  • St Louis via the UK
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(03-15-2012, 07:19 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: ... The other 2 mid mounted ones were for a possible 1/2 width shelf to use as a razor rack, but I didn't like the idea and went with the tiny stands instead...

Hi

I think you made a good decision there, those little stands are pure class Euro

If you have the time I would greatly appreciate you walking through the process of making those razor stands. Thank you Smile

Take care, Mike

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 03-16-2012, 01:39 PM
#13
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Will do Mike, but I'll need to come back to it. I need to take a picture of the tool I use for center finding on a rod. I should have time tomorrow and I know I'll have heat in the shop tomorrow.
Will do Mike. It'll probably happen tomorrow.

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 03-16-2012, 09:13 PM
#14
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very nice!

we're looking to add a cabinet above our toilet to use up some vacant wall space.

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 03-17-2012, 05:18 AM
#15
  • mikeperry
  • Senior Member
  • St Louis via the UK
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(03-16-2012, 01:39 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Will do Mike, but I'll need to come back to it. I need to take a picture of the tool I use for center finding on a rod. I should have time tomorrow and I know I'll have heat in the shop tomorrow.

Hi Brian

No rush, whenever you have the time to do so will be much appreciated. Thank you Smile

Take care, Mike

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 03-17-2012, 01:12 PM
#16
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That is a beautiful cabinet and a great solution for storing wetshaving gear. I'll bet that you have now inspired a lot of others to take up similar projects.

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 03-17-2012, 01:42 PM
#17
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Tbone, that was my goal. I sure hope so. That's why I'm giving as much info as possible.

I've seen pics of shave dens with "stuff" strewn everywhere and cabinets stuffed to the gills. Sure that works, but come on, we can do better! BTW, this reminds me of the old saw... there is only one size shaving cabinet... too small (one size shop... one size garage... insert your own whatever) . Eventually mine will be too small as well. I hope that happens later rather than sooner, but it could happen.

I want one more user razor, and a few more soaps. Storage blades are elsewhere, so is soap storage, just the few I use are in the cabinet along with the sampler.

BTW, if it helps anyone to justify it to the mrs..... on the razor shelf you'll see to the extreme right, her lady Gillette. Wink It doesn't hurt to throw a bone guys.

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 03-17-2012, 04:45 PM
#18
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Wow, beautiful, cabinet! Great work, sir!

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 03-17-2012, 05:36 PM
#19
  • GreekGuy
  • Not saving money yet....
  • La Jolla, CA
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Beautiful cabinet. I wish I had the skills to do something like that. I can only imagine how much making it yourself adds to the pleasure of using it

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 03-19-2012, 12:33 PM
#20
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How did I make the small stands? Piece of cake gents.

I had some black plastic rod on hand so that's what I used. If you need to buy some, just google "plastic rod" and you'll probably find a supplier near you, and more types of plastic rod than you knew existed. I suggest plastic because it won't wear the metal at all because of the softness of plastic. I did consider aluminum, but that will corrode, and SS is too difficult to machine (OK on a lathe though). That left plastic of the materials that were reasonable. In plastic some suggestions are, and I have no idea of price: Delrin (that's what mine are), HMW PE, Teflon, Nylon, Acrylic, PVC, there may be others that would be suitable. Delrin machines nicely, and is relatively hard as far as plastic goes. I wouldn't use ABS since the ones I know of are affected by water. Things may have changed in the 35 years I've been out of the industry though.

The rod I have is approx. 1 1/4" in diameter, and I cut them on the radial arm saw to 1" in length (height as they are in use). Then I needed to find the center of the pieces of rod. Using a center finder, which is a molded in v-block and a line that bisects the 90° angle formed by the v-block, I scribed a line. Rotating the center finder 90° I scribed another line. If your rod is round where those lines intersect will be the center of your rod. That's where you'll drill your pilot hole.

FWIW, my rod wasn't round, so the holes aren't precisely in the center, but they're close enough, they're only stands after all.

[Image: DSC03592.jpg]Here a piece of rod is positioned in the center finder just waiting for a line to be scribed. The rod has already been drilled however. This is just for illustration.

If you don't have one of these or the machinists version you'll need to measure, divide by 2 make a mark, rotate the piece and do it again until you find the center.

Use a center punch to make a divot where the lines intersect. Then using a small drill to start (A center drill is best if you have one) the hole drill through the rod. I used a drill vise to hold my pieces of rod and I used a drill press to make sure everything would be square. My drill vise has a small built in v-block to hold the rod and keep it from spinning. If you don't have a drill vise, then make one. Make a v-block out of whatever you have on hand. A piece of 3/4 stock wood is fine. Use the v-block in conjunction with a clamp to hold the piece of rod for drilling.

[Image: DSC03591.jpg]Clockwise from the extreme left: Raw plastic rod, a future stand that has been pilot drilled and countersunk, a finished stand, a razor lined up with the hole that it fits in the drill card, The drill card.

If you don't have a drill press, frankly I'd hire it done or find a neighbor with one. Or buy plenty of rod and know you'll waste some pieces. The holes must be drilled square or the razors won't stand up straight.

OK, the pilot hole is drilled all the way through every piece of rod. You did that 1) to allow drainage and 2) to allow a larger drill to follow and not wander.

Take each razor and using a drill card, find what hole the handle requires for a proper fit. You don't want a force fit or even close to that. You do want a good fit but you want the razor to go in easily and come out easily, that is, just by lifting the razor. IMO the stand should fall free and stay on the shelf. Too sloppy and the razor won't stand straight. I used a set of drill's sized to the 1/32" (or is it 64ths?). The only razor I had a problem with was the R41. No drill I had was right. The best fit I found was a drill larger than 1/2" and it's too sloppy IMO, but I can remake it at some time.

OK, you know what drill you need to use, the more material you try to remove the harder it'll be to keep the rod from spinning so slowly work your way up in drill size until you reach your goal. DO NOT drill all the way through. Set your stop to bottom out just before drilling through.

A final countersink puts a bevel on the inside of the hole.

I also sanded the outside cut edges to round them over a bit, and the cut ends to remove the saw marks. Then a wash to remove grime and they are done.

In actual practice I took a piece of paper and figured out how many stands I needed with (for the sake of illustration) a 9/16" hole, how many with a 3/8" hole, etc, then when the drill press was set up for the first of that size I did them all. Then changed the drill and did the next size after having reset the depth stop. That way I worked my way up in drill size.

If you're not done acquiring razors I suggest making a few extra blanks, you can drill them to the correct size as the need arises.

An alternate way to do this entire drilling operation is to use a lathe, and chuck up each piece. Each piece automatically gets drilled in the center with no center finding etc. . That's the easiest way, but I don't have a lathe.

If your drill bits grab too much material, there is a trick to prevent that if you also have a grinder. Grind the tiniest flat on the cutting edge of the drill bit, on the portion that is under the cutting edge as it's in operation- not in the center point of the bit; just under the cutting edge. That will prevent the drill from "grabbing". Do that on each edge. The bigger the flat the more resistent to grabbing it becomes, untill you reach a point where it won't want to cut at all. Then you need to resharpen the bit and go again. Start with the smallest flat possible, you can always increase it. That trick works for drilling soft metals also.

Any questions? I'm here, or available by PM.

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