03-09-2019, 06:09 PM
#1
  • Agravic
  • Emeritus
  • Pennsylvania, USA
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For most of us in the USA, Daylight savings time begins at 02:00, 3/10/19.

I’m not a fan of this business.

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 03-09-2019, 06:15 PM
#2
  • Sully
  • Super Moderator
  • Cedar Park, Texas
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I'm not a fan either.

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 03-09-2019, 06:20 PM
#3
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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I'm not a fan either...just pick a time (Daylight or Standard Time) and stick with it.

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 03-09-2019, 06:50 PM
#4
  • pbrmhl
  • Senior Member
  • Seattle
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I'm pleased that my state appears to be on the verge of repealing daylight savings time. The concept is depressing in the spring, when we lose an hour, and in the fall, when it gets dark an hour earlier. It's time to go.

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 03-09-2019, 06:58 PM
#5
  • MaxP
  • Senior Member
  • Des Moines, Iowa
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It sure seems like DST ends later in the year and begins earlier. If that is really the case, perhaps in a couple years the dates will meet and this silly time changing will end!

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 03-09-2019, 06:58 PM
#6
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I read that Oregon may stick to DST starting in 2021 too.  Legislation is pending.  I agree that stopping this annoying clock changing business is a good idea.  One concern though:  What if some states stick with DST and others stick with Standard Time?  It could make interstate (and international) travel and communication even more vexing that it is now.

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 03-09-2019, 07:18 PM
#7
  • pbrmhl
  • Senior Member
  • Seattle
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(03-09-2019, 06:58 PM)BrickHud Wrote: I read that Oregon may stick to DST starting in 2021 too.  Legislation is pending.  I agree that stopping this annoying clock changing business is a good idea.  One concern though:  What if some states stick with DST and others stick with Standard Time?  It could make interstate (and international) travel and communication even more vexing that it is now.

Arizona doesn't have DST, and they seem to do okay. The only annoyance (to me) is checking how many hours ahead it is when I travel there.

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 03-09-2019, 07:32 PM
#8
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We could simplify and just go GMT and 24 hr. time. But....that would be too "International" I guess. We use it in military communication centers.

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 03-10-2019, 12:32 AM
#9
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I don't like DST, and I like even less how countries don't standardise WHEN the shift is... Most of Europe changes on March 31st.

On a related pet peeve, the US date format makes no logical sense. Either do it little-endian (day-month-year - so 10/03/19) or big-endian (year-month-day - so 19/03/10). Most armed forces tends to go for the later as far as I can tell.

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 03-10-2019, 12:33 AM
#10
  • Mr_Smartepants
  • Senior Member
  • Cambridgeshire, UK (CONUS post address)
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Iceland doesn't shift between DST or any other timezones twice a year...and they're on the top-10 list of happiest countries.  Coincidence or correlation? Wink

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 03-10-2019, 02:53 AM
#11
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Correlation does not imply correlation, but plenty of studies shows that DST / summertime not only is expensive, but also causes health issues.

https://journalistsresource.org/studies/...ts-energy/
https://www.timeanddate.com/time/dst/day...ealth.html
https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/the-adv...ving-time/

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 03-10-2019, 03:21 AM
#12
  • nikos.a
  • Senior Member
  • Athens, Greece
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Three to four days is enough time to get used to the timezone change. It happens twice per year. I don't personally see any problem with this. I also haven't met a person that this caused him health problems. I believe it's more of a mental issue. I guess these people have more things to deal with than just a change in the timezone. If you ask any Greek or any other from a Mediterranean country, they'll say they love the summertime. Why? Because there is nothing better than going to the beach at 8 o'clock in the afternoon while the sun is still up. If you haven't lived this, you can't understand it.

The photo I uploaded was taken in August by me at 8.50 in the afternoon (I'm pretty sure that Tapatalk will lower the quality of this beautiful photo). Well, we love this.
I hope it won't pass because it sounds pretty silly to me and many other people. It's not sure that it will eventually apply from 2021 to all EU countries. It is just being discussed.[Image: b4ede586b60c71df251a8c1eab7523f3.jpg]

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 03-10-2019, 03:32 AM
#13
  • nikos.a
  • Senior Member
  • Athens, Greece
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(03-10-2019, 12:33 AM)Mr_Smartepants Wrote: Iceland doesn't shift between DST or any other timezones twice a year...and they're on the top-10 list of happiest countries.  Coincidence or correlation? Wink
If happiness has to do with a simple timezone change, then I don't know what to say.

How about the GDP per capita of Iceland? It was $67500 in 2017 (nominal) and it was the 6th best. The GDP per capita of Iceland in PPP was $52500.

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 03-10-2019, 04:13 AM
#14
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(03-10-2019, 12:32 AM)WegianWarrior Wrote: I don't like DST, and I like even less how countries don't standardise WHEN the shift is... Most of Europe changes on March 31st.

On a related pet peeve, the US date format makes no logical sense. Either do it little-endian (day-month-year - so 10/03/19) or big-endian (year-month-day - so 19/03/10). Most armed forces tends to go for the later as far as I can tell.
When I was in the U.S. Army, we did day-month-year. It seems most Americans do month-day-year. Never saw year-month-day. Saw Zulu Time.

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 03-10-2019, 04:23 AM
#15
  • Sully
  • Super Moderator
  • Cedar Park, Texas
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(03-10-2019, 12:32 AM)WegianWarrior Wrote: I don't like DST, and I like even less how countries don't standardise WHEN the shift is... Most of Europe changes on March 31st.

On a related pet peeve, the US date format makes no logical sense. Either do it little-endian (day-month-year - so 10/03/19) or big-endian (year-month-day - so 19/03/10). Most armed forces tends to go for the later as far as I can tell.

No kidding, it doesn't make sense to me either.  Put the date in order, it's not that hard  Smile


(03-10-2019, 04:13 AM)zipper Wrote:
(03-10-2019, 12:32 AM)WegianWarrior Wrote: I don't like DST, and I like even less how countries don't standardise WHEN the shift is... Most of Europe changes on March 31st.

On a related pet peeve, the US date format makes no logical sense. Either do it little-endian (day-month-year - so 10/03/19) or big-endian (year-month-day - so 19/03/10). Most armed forces tends to go for the later as far as I can tell.
When I was in the U.S. Army, we did day-month-year. It seems most Americans do month-day-year. Never saw year-month-day. Saw Zulu Time.

When I was in the Marines we did both, day-month-year, and year-month-day.  

I also grew up with military time.  My mother was a nurse and hospitals run on a 24 hour clock so there is no confusion about when you are giving medications or going in for surgery.  I wish we would adopt 24 time as a nation.

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 03-10-2019, 04:41 AM
#16
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One upside of using big-endian; if you name all your files "date - subject" it's really easy to find stuff if you recall roughly when you wrote it.

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 03-10-2019, 04:43 AM
#17
  • Agravic
  • Emeritus
  • Pennsylvania, USA
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(03-10-2019, 04:41 AM)WegianWarrior Wrote: One upside of using big-endian; if you name all your files "date - subject" it's really easy to find stuff if you recall roughly when you wrote it.

Yes.
I do this with my photo files.

I also use the 24:00 system; concise.

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 03-10-2019, 05:25 AM
#18
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(03-10-2019, 12:32 AM)WegianWarrior Wrote: On a related pet peeve, the US date format makes no logical sense. Either do it little-endian (day-month-year - so 10/03/19) or big-endian (year-month-day - so 19/03/10). Most armed forces tends to go for the later as far as I can tell.

Agreed.  As a frequent visitor to Europe, it takes some concentration to read dates coming and going.  But at least with dates, there are usually prompts for filling out forms (e.g. DD/MM/YYYY) or the ability to figure out from context which format is being used.  And there are two (non-military) formats that predominate, presenting mostly a binary choice, and only when crossing international borders.  With 50 states across several time zones within one country, the non-standardization of time has the potential for much more confusion.

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 03-10-2019, 06:27 AM
#19
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If elected, here is my platform:
1) eliminate DST
2) standardize clock time - maybe GST?
3) get rid of pennies, nickles, dimes and maybe quarters

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 03-10-2019, 06:30 AM
#20
  • MaxP
  • Senior Member
  • Des Moines, Iowa
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(03-10-2019, 06:27 AM)jackgoldman123 Wrote: If elected, here is my platform:
1) eliminate DST
2) standardize clock time - maybe GST?
3) get rid of pennies, nickles, dimes and maybe quarters

Should you choose to run, I'd vote for you.  I also, expect you'd readily get elected!

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