10-26-2019, 06:00 AM
#1
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Gents,

I read some reviews watched some videos, and I decided to go with the Nano Hone NL-5 lapping plate.  I will find out how it works on Monday when it arrives, and I attempt to lap my Zulu Grey stone.  

Does anyone have any thoughts from using this lapping plate?  Any pointers?

Thanks!

Vr

Matt
[Image: 3MpPOlD.png]

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 10-26-2019, 06:56 AM
#2
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Matt, I'm aware of the Nano Hone brand, but have no experience with any of its products.  About 10 years ago, I acquired a used 8" x 3" DMT Dia Sharp plate in Coarse (325 Grit), and that's been my lapping plate since.  I get good results from this plate, but will be upgrading to the 10" x 4" size.

[Image: qCYUpr7.jpg]

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 10-26-2019, 08:03 AM
#3
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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Forgive my ignorance, but what does one do with a lapping plate (besides laps, of course)? I thought laps refers to stropping. It seems from your comments that a lapping plate is used somehow with a hone stone.

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 10-26-2019, 08:16 AM
#4
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(10-26-2019, 08:03 AM)chazt Wrote: Forgive my ignorance, but what does one do with a lapping plate (besides laps, of course)? I thought laps refers to stropping. It seems from your comments that a lapping plate is used somehow with a hone stone.

According to my research stones can become uneven, and if not corrected and brought back to a true flat, the hone stone will wear the razor unevenly which will cause problems at the edge.

A lapping plate is rubbed against the hone stone to remove enough of the surface that it is brought back to a true flat.

At least that’s my understanding of it.

I looked at the DMT plates, as well as the other options, and it came down to four things:

1. I couldn’t really find many bad things online about the nano hone lapping plates.

2. The lapping plate seems to have a stout/quality build, and it is precision engineered to extremely tight tolerances.

3. I like that there are raised patterns which allows the debris to be washed away.

4. I liked the owners videos on YouTube.

I will report back after I use it on Monday night.

Vr

Matt

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 10-26-2019, 11:43 AM
#5
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(10-26-2019, 08:03 AM)chazt Wrote: Forgive my ignorance, but what does one do with a lapping plate (besides laps, of course)? I thought laps refers to stropping. It seems from your comments that a lapping plate is used somehow with a hone stone.

Charlie, to lap a hone is to make it flat.  A lapping plate is made from a material which will remain flat, and has an abrasive on top.  Mine, for example, is heavy, solid steel (2 lbs, 6 oz), and has a diamond abrasive.  You rub the hone on the lapping plate to make  the hone flat.  

There are various different types of lapping plates which perform this function.  I've never used one like Matt's, so I'm looking forward to his comments on it.

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 10-26-2019, 02:41 PM
#6
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DMT is an excellent cheaper alternative to flattening your stones. The only downside is the DMT sticking to your stones when lapping/flattening. I personally use an Atoma 400 and I also own several Shapton ones however they wear down very quickly under heavy use so I stopped buying them. I do hone more than the average person though. The one that Matt bought should also benefit from not sticking to your stones.

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 10-26-2019, 03:07 PM
#7
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(10-26-2019, 02:41 PM)Max Sprecher Wrote: DMT is an excellent cheaper alternative to flattening your stones. The only downside is the DMT sticking to your stones when lapping/flattening. I personally use an Atoma 400 and I also own several Shapton ones however they wear down very quickly under heavy use so I stopped buying them. I do hone more than the average person though. The one that Matt bought should also benefit from not sticking to your stones.

Hey Max! How often do you lap a stone? After every use, every few uses? Is there a method to that madness?

The fear for me is that once I start really caring about achieving a perfectly flat surface, I will want it that way each time.

Just like using the ZG between each shave for 100 laps with no pressure, and then stropping.

Thanks!

Vr

Matt

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 10-26-2019, 03:48 PM
#8
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I refresh my stones after honing around 3 razors to mostly remove the black slurry/steel/gunk. A few swipes in circular motion and North/South until the surface looks clean again. I’ll go back to the square pencil lines on the stone to flatten them usually once a month. I do this to all the stones in my line-up.

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 10-26-2019, 03:58 PM
#9
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Thanks!

Vr

Matt

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 10-26-2019, 05:56 PM
#10
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(10-26-2019, 02:41 PM)Max Sprecher Wrote: DMT is an excellent cheaper alternative to flattening your stones. The only downside is the DMT sticking to your stones when lapping/flattening. I personally use an Atoma 400 and I also own several Shapton ones however they wear down very quickly under heavy use so I stopped buying them. I do hone more than the average person though. The one that Matt bought should also benefit from not sticking to your stones.

Yes, this is definitely the case.  It's particularly noticeable when you're finished lapping and are separating the DMT plate from the hone.

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 10-26-2019, 07:31 PM
#11
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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This is all quite interesting. Thanks very much, gents, for all your replies. The education is really appreciated Smile

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 10-29-2019, 01:05 PM
#12
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Gents,

This Nano Hone NL-5 lapping plate blew my little chicken nugget mind, and it’s like the machinist’s Mona Lisa!  Supposedly it flattens stones to 0.5μm.

I don’t even know what that measurement is...aside from it means the stone become flat.  

I finally got a chance to fool around with it on my Zulu Grey 8x3 finishing stone this afternoon.  

The packaging is quite nice, and it comes with directions and an inspection certificate.  The presentation is first class.

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The Zulu Grey (ZG) is a very dense, hard, high grit equivalent natural stone, and I have not been able to raise a slurry with its slurry stone.  I don’t have a DMT card, and so I have just been using sprayed on water, and a drop of liquid dish soap.  It has been working tremendously well, and I guess I will stick with it!  

I was a little worried that the ZG would not be a good fit for the plate, and that it might be better to lap it with a progression of different Silicon Carbide powders on a granite plate like I plan to do with the Arkansas Black stone that I am planning to purchase shortly.

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 10-29-2019, 01:09 PM
#13
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 10-29-2019, 01:11 PM
#14
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So I took the thing out of the box, and marked grid lines across the stone with a pencil.

[Image: JOOg6mB.jpg][Image: NgfJ9gV.jpg][Image: rwBwWS5.jpg][Image: 3EpWBkf.jpg]

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 10-29-2019, 01:15 PM
#15
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The next three photos show the stone wet, what it looked like after a minute of easy lapping, the only section that had pencil on it after two minutes, and that pencil went away after an additional 30 seconds of easy lapping. There was zero sticking with this plate.

[Image: IITtFP1.jpg][Image: lSDR0aW.jpg][Image: kcZG7ei.jpg]

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 10-29-2019, 01:18 PM
#16
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It was so easy, I said to myself...pencil probably washed off too easy with the water.  So I put new grid lines on with a permanent marker.

This time it took one minute of lapping, I washed the stone and NL-5 off, and then sprayed the stone again with water, lapped for another minute, afterwards the permanent black lines were gone, and the ZG was very flat.

[Image: DawDcMb.jpg][Image: txUOx6D.jpg][Image: AZRYrXT.jpg]

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 10-29-2019, 01:29 PM
#17
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[Image: yHbvrEp.jpg]

So...I don’t have a clue what I am doing...just reading stuff online, and watching YouTube videos...but this was super super easy.  The ZG was 100% smooth to the touch, and I could only see the lightest of scratch patterns, which are better described as swirls on the ZG’s surface.  It was ready to be used, and so I got out the Brian Brown 6/8 razor that I use to experiment with for these sorts of things.  I ran it along the surface under its own weight for 300 laps, adding water via the spray bottle as needed.  Towards the end the blade was feeling slightly sticky on the hone, which I read is a good thing!

Afterwards, I lightly stropped the razor, and moved it around in the light so I could assess the edge.  It looks like a mirror, and appears to be ready to go...I can’t wait to give it a whirl tomorrow.  

Once I put the razor in the stand, I relapped the ZG, just to ensure it was clean and ready to go for the next time.

What a joy to use this plate, and the stone this afternoon.  I will report back after tomorrow’s shave regarding the edge’s performance.

Vr

Matt

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 10-29-2019, 01:53 PM
#18
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Matt, thanks for the detailed review of this lapping plate.  You're having fun, so that's what matters most.

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 10-29-2019, 01:58 PM
#19
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My pleasure!

Vr

Matt

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 10-29-2019, 04:15 PM
#20
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I could have waited until tomorrow to shave, but said to myself, “What’s the point?”

The edge was impeccable...superb...wonderful...etc!

Vr

Matt

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