11-08-2019, 12:40 AM
#1
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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This is a mint condition Ever Ready travel brush with a bone handle and horn ferrule, and loft of 'mixed badger'. The model is 1612M, and according to my researches (difficult) it dates to 1925. It may be as small as 70-75mm in total length with a 16mm knot. I have not yet received it, but I will provide more details when I do. 

Interestingly, the brush comes with the original metal case, which (I am assuming) must also be smaller than the usual metal brush/soap tin.

I found some scant references and images from threads in other sites. This example, though, is unused and mint, thanks to its having been kept in its case all these years. Two sneak peek images and a poster reference (undated) below. I found a reference to the brush next to it and worked out the date that way.

In the meantime...pictures. Enjoy!

[Image: qX447L9.jpg]
[Image: hlqQSQ0.jpg][Image: ClBGknU.jpg]

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 11-08-2019, 05:26 AM
#2
  • NJDJ
  • Senior Member
  • New Jersey
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Beautiful brush...very neat addition to your den.

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 11-08-2019, 11:41 AM
#3
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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(11-08-2019, 05:26 AM)NJDJ Wrote: Beautiful brush...very neat addition to your den.

Yes. I look forward to receiving it!

I have a few small travel brushes. This may be worthy of starting off a new thread about small brushes.

I used not to be a fan of horn... but now I really appreciate it.

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 11-09-2019, 11:50 AM
#4
  • BSWoodturning
  • Co-Owner, Brad Sears ShaveWorks
  • Maryland Eastern Shore
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Great find!  Enjoy.

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 11-09-2019, 03:03 PM
#5
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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(11-09-2019, 11:50 AM)BSWoodturning Wrote: Great find!  Enjoy.

Thank you, Brad. You always chime in. I know you recognise beautiful vintage brushes when you see them. Tell me; do you look at the workmanship as much as the overall aesthetic? I confess that my knowledge of making is very limited. Being a maker, you must have a heightened sense of aesthetic appreciation. Do you think that's right? I think it must be.

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 11-10-2019, 12:20 PM
#6
  • rev579
  • μαθητής
  • East Texas
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(11-09-2019, 03:03 PM)Shaun Wrote:
(11-09-2019, 11:50 AM)BSWoodturning Wrote: Great find!  Enjoy.

Thank you, Brad. You always chime in. I know you recognise beautiful vintage brushes when you see them. Tell me; do you look at the workmanship as much as the overall aesthetic? I confess that my knowledge of making is very limited. Being a maker, you must have a heightened sense of aesthetic appreciation. Do you think that's right? I think it must be.

I have the very brush as well, however, the knot was essentially falling out. I dropped a 16mm Finest and haven't looked back. It's bigger than the Gillette/Rubberset travel brush and the Wee Scott, yet a perfect traveler. Twine was used to keep the bone and horn locked tight on mine and I have not been able to separate the handle.
Enjoy.

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 11-10-2019, 12:27 PM
#7
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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(11-10-2019, 12:20 PM)rev579 Wrote:
(11-09-2019, 03:03 PM)Shaun Wrote:
(11-09-2019, 11:50 AM)BSWoodturning Wrote: Great find!  Enjoy.

Thank you, Brad. You always chime in. I know you recognise beautiful vintage brushes when you see them. Tell me; do you look at the workmanship as much as the overall aesthetic? I confess that my knowledge of making is very limited. Being a maker, you must have a heightened sense of aesthetic appreciation. Do you think that's right? I think it must be.

I have the very brush as well, however, the knot was essentially falling out. I dropped a 16mm Finest and haven't looked back. It's bigger than the Gillette/Rubberset travel brush and the Wee Scott, yet a perfect traveler. Twine was used to keep the bone and horn locked tight on mine and I have not been able to separate the handle.
Enjoy.

Hello!

Is there any chance you might post a picture? That would be really great Smile

Shaun

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 11-10-2019, 03:26 PM
#8
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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Shaun, your discoveries always help to shed more light on the history of men’s shaving. You must have acquired enough gear by now to display it in a gallery! Thank you, again.

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 11-10-2019, 03:37 PM
#9
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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(11-10-2019, 03:26 PM)chazt Wrote: Shaun, your discoveries always help to shed more light on the history of men’s shaving. You must have acquired enough gear by now to display it in a gallery! Thank you, again.

Thank you. I appreciate the affirmation, Chaz. 

Currently, I am putting together a set of Australian shaving items. I hope to put them into a museum, if I can interest one. This is not as easy as it might seem, unfortunately. There are some remarkable little objects that may otherwise be lost to history. That's the thing: either I keep them (but why?) or I make them available for others to view in a permanent collection, forming a part of a 'local' history of men's (and women's) shaving.

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 11-11-2019, 06:43 AM
#10
  • BSWoodturning
  • Co-Owner, Brad Sears ShaveWorks
  • Maryland Eastern Shore
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(11-09-2019, 03:03 PM)Shaun Wrote:
(11-09-2019, 11:50 AM)BSWoodturning Wrote: Great find!  Enjoy.

Thank you, Brad. You always chime in. I know you recognise beautiful vintage brushes when you see them. Tell me; do you look at the workmanship as much as the overall aesthetic? I confess that my knowledge of making is very limited. Being a maker, you must have a heightened sense of aesthetic appreciation. Do you think that's right? I think it must be.

You're welcome, Shaun.  (And thank you for your kind words!)  Do I have a heightened aesthetic sense?  Perhaps.  I don't know.  Let's just say I'm a stickler for detail--for getting things as "right" as I can.  To that end, I derive inspiration from the extraordinary craftsmanship of the storied English gunmakers like Purdy, Holland & Holland, and Boss; and from the elegant Pennsylvania ("Kentucky") long rifles in their Golden Age.  They were beautifully designed to appeal to the eye (and so to generate sales, like brushes today!), yet they also had to function perfectly every time because men's lives depended upon them.  (Let's face it:  failure in the face of a charging lion--or bear--wasn't exactly conducive to future business.)  On the wet shaving side, I look at the marriage of aesthetics and technology Ken and Cody Lynn are achieving at Paladin, and have the greatest admiration for the hand work of contemporary razor makers like Glen Mercurio and my friend Max Sprecher.

But to answer your question about vintage brushes:  I start with the design.  If it appeals, I'll look at execution/workmanship although workmanship in vintage brushes is somewhat secondary to me.  I appreciate excellence yet I recognize, like most of us, that vintage brushes were produced in eras where they were necessities rather than the collectors' pieces best-in-class brushes have become today.

As we know, vintage brush makers for the most part (there were of course exceptions) focused on speed and economy.  That would have put pressure on the production folks--especially in the cottage industry where makers were paid on a piecework basis--to get their brushes out the door as quickly as they could.  (It's the old good/fast/cheap triangle:  you only get to pick two.)  For that, and other reasons, we view the blemishes often found in vintage brushes kindly rather than critically.  We appreciate these brushes for what they are:  gems from a bygone era.

So to come full circle, Nancy, Lee and I attempt to re-create--and, where appropriate, to improve upon--the most appealing vintage/classic designs.  We do that employing only hand-held and manually-controlled equipment.  Making best-in-class anything (razors, brushes, whatever...) requires time.  And creating by hand takes even more time.  That's because every component must be painstakingly checked, by hand, before moving on.  ("Bi-Colour" handles are especially maddening because the slightest mismatch means an hour or two's intense concentration goes right into the trash.)  We look at every aspect of every work piece, not because lives depend upon it (they don't!) but because we are obligated to our patrons, who rightly expect best-in-class workmanship, and also to pay tribute to the makers who have gone before us.

Maybe one day our work might end up in a museum.   Smile

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 11-11-2019, 11:33 AM
#11
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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Such a wonderful, full and detailed, considered reply!

In itself, your explanation of you and your colleagues' work, work ethic and hand-making processes is a real eye-opener. I learned so much! To respond in detail could only take away, and so I will let your reply speak for itself.

It's a wonderful read, so thank you! I am sure other thread-readers will have developed a deeper appreciation for the craftsman/womanship involved. :0

Best wishes, and kind regards

Shaun
[/quote]

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 11-11-2019, 04:28 PM
#12
  • rev579
  • μαθητής
  • East Texas
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(11-10-2019, 12:27 PM)Shaun Wrote:
(11-10-2019, 12:20 PM)rev579 Wrote:
(11-09-2019, 03:03 PM)Shaun Wrote: Thank you, Brad. You always chime in. I know you recognise beautiful vintage brushes when you see them. Tell me; do you look at the workmanship as much as the overall aesthetic? I confess that my knowledge of making is very limited. Being a maker, you must have a heightened sense of aesthetic appreciation. Do you think that's right? I think it must be.

I have the very brush as well, however, the knot was essentially falling out. I dropped a 16mm Finest and haven't looked back. It's bigger than the Gillette/Rubberset travel brush and the Wee Scott, yet a perfect traveler. Twine was used to keep the bone and horn locked tight on mine and I have not been able to separate the handle.
Enjoy.

Hello!

Is there any chance you might post a picture? That would be really great Smile

Shaun

When I found it, I did not know anything about it other than it looked like it was a Bone and Horn(or wood) brush.
[Image: zDsaDGG.jpg]

The knot was far less stable than the image suggests. So, I began to clean it up. I oiled the horn too. The colors came out awesome.

[Image: pH6iF3c.jpg]

The opening will allow a 16mm knot, but avoid one with the crazy glue bulge. I was trying to choose between a cheap synthetic knot, a Silver-Tip and a Finest.

[Image: CvYIOqB.jpg]

I have been using it for quite a long time...without setting the knot. Part of my hesitation is I want to find out how to best retain the great colors of the ferrule, however, the soap basically strips the oil from the horn, drying it out and rendering a much duller finish.

[Image: veVv7fp.jpg]

I am a fan of a smaller knotted brush. I need to let go of some more, but they are all vintage...which I also geek out over. Here is an image that is about a year old.

[Image: aVhCGCb.jpg]


Here it is today, with a Star, a Bone and Horn(that I believe is from ~1905), the 1612m, 1912 Gillette Travel brush, and a Wee Scot.

[Image: hFPXnl9.jpg]

I wish I knew how to lock in the depth of the horn without it drying up as it does. If I oil it up, it will look just like it did a year ago. I used some CA on the 1905 brush, but only a very light coat, just to see how long it would last. Not long enough for my tastes.

Here are some other images from my search to uncover the mystery brush. This one is not my brush, and the owner was not to be found...

[Image: ry6k2Kn.jpg]

[Image: WDHv0Yo.jpg]

[Image: lxFmOI5.jpg]

When you get to the point of cleaning out the inside of the ferrule, while it is a slower approach, the use of dental tools to remove the crystalized "glue" will lessen any damage to the inside of the ferrule. It all comes out pretty easily. And as i stated earlier, i was unable to unscrew the ferrule from the base, but was able to clean the inside out anyway.
[Image: r2EM1ur.jpg]

[Image: TccGBmM.jpg]

[Image: L3ghYvu.jpg]

[Image: TSOt3S5.jpg]

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 11-11-2019, 04:50 PM
#13
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Queens, NY
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Great post, rev579! The plentiful photos really illustrate your work. Thanks for sharing.

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 11-11-2019, 05:00 PM
#14
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(11-11-2019, 04:50 PM)chazt Wrote: Great post, rev579! The plentiful photos really illustrate your work. Thanks for sharing.

+1

Very, very nice.

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 11-11-2019, 06:07 PM
#15
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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Like a family reunited!

Thank you everyone for contributing to this really great thread!

As I say, when my version arrives, I’ll be sure to post images and specifications.

Shaun

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 11-11-2019, 07:11 PM
#16
  • rev579
  • μαθητής
  • East Texas
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(11-11-2019, 04:50 PM)chazt Wrote: Great post, rev579! The plentiful photos really illustrate your work. Thanks for sharing.

(11-11-2019, 05:00 PM)ChiefBroom Wrote:
(11-11-2019, 04:50 PM)chazt Wrote: Great post, rev579! The plentiful photos really illustrate your work. Thanks for sharing.

+1

Very, very nice.

Thanks Chaz & Chief. It was one of my first real "restores," even though technically it is still incomplete.

(11-11-2019, 06:07 PM)Shaun Wrote: Like a family reunited!

Thank you everyone for contributing to this really great thread!

As I say, when my version arrives, I’ll be sure to post images and specifications.

Shaun

Don't force separating the ferrule and base. My 1905 horn ferrule has a crack and the other one pictured also has a few cracks. If you can separate the 2 parts, loading the knot from the inside, a glue bulge won't necessarily be an issue, requiring the ferrule to be opened at all.

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 11-11-2019, 10:07 PM
#17
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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“Don't force separating the ferrule and base. My 1905 horn ferrule has a crack and the other one pictured also has a few cracks. If you can separate the 2 parts, loading the knot from the inside, a glue bulge won't necessarily be an issue, requiring the ferrule to be opened at all.”
[/quote]

Good advice, but as my version is mint and unused, I’ll be preserving it just as it is. I am a bit geeky about preservation of originality. I have enough brushes to use anyway. I will try to use it, but if I can’t, I’ll just preserve it as is an as original, fully intact, beautiful historical object.

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 11-12-2019, 12:15 AM
#18
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Can I just say I've been enjoying following this conversation? Ok? Good...

I've really enjoyed following this conversation Biggrin

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 11-12-2019, 01:00 PM
#19
  • rev579
  • μαθητής
  • East Texas
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(11-11-2019, 10:07 PM)Shaun Wrote: “Don't force separating the ferrule and base. My 1905 horn ferrule has a crack and the other one pictured also has a few cracks. If you can separate the 2 parts, loading the knot from the inside, a glue bulge won't necessarily be an issue, requiring the ferrule to be opened at all.”

Good advice, but as my version is mint and unused, I’ll be preserving it just as it is. I am a bit geeky about preservation of originality. I have enough brushes to use anyway. I will try to use it, but if I can’t, I’ll just preserve it as is an as original, fully intact, beautiful historical object.
[/quote]

Here's a little more.
I do have a few more files associated with the 1612, but from your original post, I am inclined to think you have found most of the online material I have found. I will add that your brush may be from before 1919, when the brushes had to be identified as "Sterilized".


Here is another, from 1937, to muddy up the water a bit:

[Image: 9ftXTcZ.jpg]

Mine, and presumably yours, is both bone and horn, yet this one is celluloid, top to bottom. I have a few of the 200CC's which these evolved into, in my opinion.

[Image: DUOJCvX.jpg]

This is for scale.

[Image: 4aBoXKV.jpg]

Another scale shot...

[Image: E1i8FzU.jpg]

It blooms really nice with the 16mm knot.

[Image: ChtYqGd.jpg]

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 Yesterday, 11:44 AM
#20
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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Excellent additional information, Rev. This thread is very comprehensive now, and much more informative. I appreciate your significant researches! I really like those 200CCs... Smile

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