11-13-2019, 03:16 PM
#21
  • BSWoodturning
  • Co-Owner, Brad Sears ShaveWorks
  • Maryland Eastern Shore
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(11-13-2019, 11:44 AM)Shaun Wrote: Excellent additional information, Rev. This thread is very comprehensive now, and much more informative. I appreciate your significant researches! I really like those 200CCs... Smile

+1!  

As thoughts for any among us who might like to try this kind of restoration, I would probably wet sand the ferrule by hand starting with (probably) 600 grit wet & dry paper with the grain (i.e., from handle to socket) and progress to 1,000 then 1,500 grits, rinsing between steps and finish by polishing with a medium cut automotive polish.  I'd then wet sand the bone handle through the same grit/polish progression, only with the handle I'd probably sand radially as I don't know that bone has as a distinct grain pattern.  The idea is to take your time, go slowly, and check progress along the way making sure I had an even scratch pattern before progressing to the next finer grit.  The 600 should remove any gross imperfections while the finer grits create finer and finer scratch patterns.  The polish, of course, should remove the last visible scratches leaving a pleasant semi-gloss sheen.

If the handle/ferrule was cracked, I would apply a very small amount of Loctite Stick n' Seal Extreme to one side of the crack with a flat toothpick and lightly clamp the crack together for 3-4 hours while the adhesive sets up.  (This "flavor" of Loctite is a clear, non-yellowing adhesive that bonds just about anything to anything and stands up, as the name suggests, to some pretty extreme conditions.  More info at the Loctite website.)   I might also use the same adhesive to join the handle and ferrule if there was a slight (i.e. barely noticeable) amount of play between the two when dry fit together.  (With a tight fit, a fine CA glue would likely work just as well--and bond faster.)   The trick to adhesives "success" is to use just enough to join the parts/sections but no more.  It's somewhat counter-intuitive, but all the tech support folks tell me "less is more".  But if you're like me and get a little "squeeze out," a paper shop towel dampened with acetone and rubbed across the joint should clean things up nicely.

As Shaun says, this has been an exceptionally enjoyable and informative thread.  Great work, gentlemen!

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 11-14-2019, 06:53 AM
#22
  • rev579
  • μαθητής
  • East Texas
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(11-13-2019, 03:16 PM)BSWoodturning Wrote:
(11-13-2019, 11:44 AM)Shaun Wrote: Excellent additional information, Rev. This thread is very comprehensive now, and much more informative. I appreciate your significant researches! I really like those 200CCs... Smile

+1!  

As thoughts for any among us who might like to try this kind of restoration, I would probably wet sand the ferrule by hand starting with (probably) 600 grit wet & dry paper with the grain (i.e., from handle to socket) and progress to 1,000 then 1,500 grits, rinsing between steps and finish by polishing with a medium cut automotive polish.  I'd then wet sand the bone handle through the same grit/polish progression, only with the handle I'd probably sand radially as I don't know that bone has as a distinct grain pattern.  The idea is to take your time, go slowly, and check progress along the way making sure I had an even scratch pattern before progressing to the next finer grit.  The 600 should remove any gross imperfections while the finer grits create finer and finer scratch patterns.  The polish, of course, should remove the last visible scratches leaving a pleasant semi-gloss sheen.

If the handle/ferrule was cracked, I would apply a very small amount of Loctite Stick n' Seal Extreme to one side of the crack with a flat toothpick and lightly clamp the crack together for 3-4 hours while the adhesive sets up.  (This "flavor" of Loctite is a clear, non-yellowing adhesive that bonds just about anything to anything and stands up, as the name suggests, to some pretty extreme conditions.  More info at the Loctite website.)   I might also use the same adhesive to join the handle and ferrule if there was a slight (i.e. barely noticeable) amount of play between the two when dry fit together.  (With a tight fit, a fine CA glue would likely work just as well--and bond faster.)   The trick to adhesives "success" is to use just enough to join the parts/sections but no more.  It's somewhat counter-intuitive, but all the tech support folks tell me "less is more".  But if you're like me and get a little "squeeze out," a paper shop towel dampened with acetone and rubbed across the joint should clean things up nicely.

As Shaun says, this has been an exceptionally enjoyable and informative thread.  Great work, gentlemen!
Brad, that is great stuff!

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