09-24-2012, 07:49 AM
#1
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There have been a couple posts recently that have advised people to listen to how the razor cuts the beard as a way of monitoring how the shave is going. The catch for me is that I only have about 20-25 percent of normal hearing, and that's only in one ear.

So I was wondering if anyone else on here can't hear and how they adjust. I'm pretty confident in my technique, but I'm always up for additional tips.

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 09-24-2012, 08:15 AM
#2
  • Johan
  • Barberian of the lathering
  • Sweden
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I´m not one of them so i cant help you. But its funny that you started a thread about this since i thought about it yesterday. What if i became deaf in the future. How would i shave without hearing the razor cutting the beard?

So how do you cope with it Matt? :-)

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 09-24-2012, 08:58 AM
#3
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Matt, thanks for starting this thread. i usually do a visual and then a feel observation. i rarely listen to the sound of the razor to determine if it is cutting. i guess i must be a tad unorthodox, but that is how i have always done it.
Best of luck to you, sir!

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 09-24-2012, 09:05 AM
#4
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I can hear when the razor goes through near my right ear, but that's about it. So audio for most of the shave isn't an option.

My basic approach is a two pass shave (WTG, ATG), then feeling for any rough spots. I know what areas on my face give me the most trouble, so I start there. I look closely as well. If it looks or feels off, a little more lather and a quick touch-up usually do the trick.

In short, the hands and eyes become much more important for me.

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 09-24-2012, 09:05 AM
#5
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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(09-24-2012, 08:58 AM)celestino Wrote: Matt, thanks for starting this thread. i usually do a visual and then a feel observation. i rarely listen to the sound of the razor to determine if it is cutting. i guess i must be a tad unorthodox, but that is how i have always done it.
Best of luck to you, sir!

This is also the way I have always shaved. Touch and feel.

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 09-24-2012, 09:35 AM
#6
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(09-24-2012, 07:49 AM)Observereport Wrote: There have been a couple posts recently that have advised people to listen to how the razor cuts the beard as a way of monitoring how the shave is going. The catch for me is that I only have about 20-25 percent of normal hearing, and that's only in one ear.

So I was wondering if anyone else on here can't hear and how they adjust. I'm pretty confident in my technique, but I'm always up for additional tips.

It's a matter of touch and feel for me, so I don't see any unique problems for you. Just be careful, and enjoy the experience.

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 09-24-2012, 09:44 AM
#7
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It's always been about feel and visuals for me.

But I use a straight razor.

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 09-24-2012, 11:42 AM
#8
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I cannot give you a credible advice since my hearing is fine, only can tell you what I would try to do if challenged that way.

Besides listening to the blade singing I also pay attention to the feel of the blade on skin. As most of us know it is also about feeling and visual.

What I think I would do, if my hearing acuity would change, is get a stainless razor or get a spare (back up) for the Zamak one, and use one razor only for the rest of my life. This way you would get used to it an a matter of weeks and then it will be muscle memory only. If you are a traditional wet shaver there are many other variables that you can play with and bring small pleasures in life. Focus on blades, brushes, soaps, creams, oils, aftershaves... plenty of other things that make our way of shaving so interesting.

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 09-24-2012, 01:49 PM
#9
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VERY interesting thread and perspective IMO! Thanks for bringing it up.

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 09-24-2012, 03:05 PM
#10
  • matloffm
  • Senior Member
  • Culver City, CA
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(09-24-2012, 11:42 AM)VerbaVolant Wrote: Besides listening to the blade singing I also pay attention to the feel of the blade on skin. As most of us know it is also about feeling and visual.

I agree with VerbaVolant. My OCs "sing" well but my SBs not so much. Even so, I can't hear the blade all the time. The feel of the razor on the skin is the key for me. I don't usually feel for missed areas until after the second pass (or third if there is one), so razor on skin is my primary guide. Cool

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 09-24-2012, 03:55 PM
#11
  • biggiej42
  • Looney for Rooney
  • Stony Point, NY
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Matt, my wife has about 20% in one ear, and totally deaf in the other. When she shaves her legs, she does it by touch and feel.

I've just recently started shaving by ear, but it's just another dimension. When I first started, I had the fan going and the water running the whole time. Truthfully, I didn't notice a difference. The sound just told me something I already knew, either there was stubble left or there wasnt. Something I could easily feel with my hands after a rinse.

I now shave by look/feel/sound, but mostly just to save on my water bill Smile.

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 09-24-2012, 04:02 PM
#12
  • EHV
  • Senior Member
  • Milford,PA
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I wish that I could help as well. I rely on the sound, sometimes too much.
If I am making the last pass and I still hear significant noise even if all looks and feels well, it can sometimes cause me to apply pressure and get irritation. I'm already at BBS yet I still hear *something* on my face.

It seems like you are doing quite well with your shaves, even without all of the noise Matt!

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 09-26-2012, 12:33 AM
#13
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Touch and feel for me as well. In fact I do not even think I hear the blade against my skin. I do get my beard nice and soft before I shave and have not really paid attention to the sound. I also depend on what I see in the mirror after my 3rd pass. There are a couple places where my beard is not grey so I can see that maybe I need a touch up pass in those areas. I just run my hand over those areas to be sure and apply the touch up pass as needed.

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