01-23-2022, 02:19 AM
#81
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Not reading anything right now, but im always listening to audio books. For the 8th time im listening through the series of Christopher Silfverbielke (swedish book series about a psychopath, narccisist and just a complete wiffleball, very enjoyable and at times pretty disgusting)

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 04-22-2022, 11:59 AM
#82
  • 2Chops
  • Senior Member
  • North Central PA
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Managed to finish Moby Dick a couple of weeks ago.  Started this right off.  Another Hemingway on deck.
[Image: HXFq7TG.jpg]

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 04-23-2022, 11:13 AM
#83
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Conan, the barbarian.
[Image: 8ab386dd1af71bf4a395afade95144be.jpg]

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 04-25-2022, 09:14 AM
#84
  • ARGH
  • Senior Member
  • Boston, MA
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Three books in the working:

  1. "Stolen Focus: Why You Can't Pay Attention" by Johann Hari
  2. "The Ideal Team Player..." by Patrick Lencioni
  3. "The Five People You Meet in Heaven" by Mitch Albom. I read it in 2005 for the first time while living in Paris. Since then, I re-read it every time I miss those days Smile

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 04-25-2022, 09:51 AM
#85
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Grit by Angela Duckworth
The Groundbreakers by Charles Dagit
Everest to Arabia by Jamie Clarke
Suez by John Pudney

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 04-26-2022, 05:15 AM
#86
  • Bax
  • Active Member
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(04-25-2022, 09:14 AM)ARGH Wrote: Three books in the working:


  1. "Stolen Focus: Why You Can't Pay Attention" by Johann Hari
  2. "The Ideal Team Player..." by Patrick Lencioni
  3. "The Five People You Meet in Heaven" by Mitch Albom. I read it in 2005 for the first time while living in Paris. Since then, I re-read it every time I miss those days Smile

HA!   I caught that!

"Stolen Focus: Why You Can't Pay Attention" -- then listing two MORE books you're reading -- simultaneously!
If that was an "Easter Egg" you intentionally dropped in your post to see if anyone would notice, I spotted it!
LOL!  Well played!
   :-)
- Bax

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 06-14-2022, 07:40 AM
#87
  • 2Chops
  • Senior Member
  • North Central PA
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Finished up Hemingway's "The Torrents of Spring" last week.  Now onto this.  Been wanting to read it for quite a while.
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 07-03-2022, 12:27 PM
#88
  • 2Chops
  • Senior Member
  • North Central PA
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Still not quite done with the above Kafka work.  But picked up this classic yesterday for only $9.  Saw it last year and had to choose between it and Moby Dick.  Found myself back at the same bookstore, and lo and behold there it still was. Had to get it while the getting was good.  Started the trek with this classic Hugo work this afternoon.
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 07-03-2022, 12:43 PM
#89
  • garyg
  • Senior Member
  • Great Lakes
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I'm always reading but mostly present best sellers that catch me eye.  I also use audiobooks while walking .. at any rate, just finished A Confederacy of Dunces on audio .. wildly funny this time, some folks on the path thought I was laughing inappropriately at one point ,,

I need to try Les Miz again, and have used this post as inspiration to order it up at the library

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 07-05-2022, 08:59 AM
#90
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(08-15-2021, 01:08 PM)2Chops Wrote: Keep forgetting to update this.  A couple of weeks ago I got done reading this by Defoe (see bottom pic).  Now reading this by Dostoevsky.
[Image: casbbRa.jpg]
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You esthete, sir! (yours faithfully)

You are familiar with Anna Karenina (Lev Tolstoy)? I hope you didn't watch film and haven't spoiled to myself impression about this tremendous work. The great Russian writer Vladimir Nabokov (one of my darlings and I recommend with him will get acquainted), who lived in America told the following about the Russian literature and classics:

Alfred Appel, a student of Vladimir Nabokov, recalled one of his mentor's lectures: “...Suddenly Nabokov interrupted the lecture, walked, without saying a word, along the stage to the right wall and turned off the three lamps under the ceiling. Then he descended the steps - there were five or six of them - into the hall, trudged heavily along the entire aisle between the rows, accompanied by the astonished turn of two hundred heads, and silently lowered the curtains on three or four large windows ... The hall plunged into darkness. ...Nabokov returned to the stage, climbed the steps and went to the switches. “In the firmament of Russian literature,” he announced, “this is Pushkin!” A lamp flashed in the far left corner of our planetarium. “It's Gogol!” A lamp flashed in the middle of the hall. "It's Chekhov!" The lamp on the right flared up. Then Nabokov again descended from the stage, went to the central window and unhooked the curtain, which flew up with a loud bang: “Bam!” As if by magic, a wide, dense beam of dazzling sunlight burst into the audience. “And this is Tolstoy!” Nabokov thundered.

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 07-05-2022, 06:04 PM
#91
  • 2Chops
  • Senior Member
  • North Central PA
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(07-05-2022, 08:59 AM)certif Wrote:
(08-15-2021, 01:08 PM)2Chops Wrote: Keep forgetting to update this.  A couple of weeks ago I got done reading this by Defoe (see bottom pic).  Now reading this by Dostoevsky.
[Image: casbbRa.jpg]
[Image: tH559jC.jpg]

You esthete, sir! (yours faithfully)

You are familiar with Anna Karenina (Lev Tolstoy)? I hope you didn't watch film and haven't spoiled to myself impression about this tremendous work. The great Russian writer Vladimir Nabokov (one of my darlings and I recommend with him will get acquainted), who lived in America told the following about the Russian literature and classics:

Alfred Appel, a student of Vladimir Nabokov, recalled one of his mentor's lectures: “...Suddenly Nabokov interrupted the lecture, walked, without saying a word, along the stage to the right wall and turned off the three lamps under the ceiling. Then he descended the steps - there were five or six of them - into the hall, trudged heavily along the entire aisle between the rows, accompanied by the astonished turn of two hundred heads, and silently lowered the curtains on three or four large windows ... The hall plunged into darkness. ...Nabokov returned to the stage, climbed the steps and went to the switches. “In the firmament of Russian literature,” he announced, “this is Pushkin!” A lamp flashed in the far left corner of our planetarium. “It's Gogol!” A lamp flashed in the middle of the hall. "It's Chekhov!" The lamp on the right flared up. Then Nabokov again descended from the stage, went to the central window and unhooked the curtain, which flew up with a loud bang: “Bam!” As if by magic, a wide, dense beam of dazzling sunlight burst into the audience. “And this is Tolstoy!” Nabokov thundered.

Great story.  Thanks for the share.

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 08-04-2022, 06:07 PM
#92
  • 2Chops
  • Senior Member
  • North Central PA
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The long trek has begun.
[Image: p7I2097.jpg]

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 08-05-2022, 02:57 AM
#93
  • garyg
  • Senior Member
  • Great Lakes
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(08-04-2022, 06:07 PM)2Chops Wrote: The long trek has begun.
[Image: p7I2097.jpg]
Amazing what those fools in advertising come up with in their pursuit of banality - the Now a Major Motion Picture hook on the cover of one of the all time great novels speaks sadly of ourselves .. 

As promised above, I got a copy from the library of an abridged version (didn't get going until it was overdue) and an audiobook proved too difficult while on a treadmill .. so I have ordered one used that should arrive shortly (the local used book emporium didn't have it) ..

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 08-05-2022, 06:46 AM
#94
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Rebel with a Clause by Ellen Jovin
for fans of grammar and usage and humor

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 08-05-2022, 04:05 PM
#95
  • chazt
  • Super Moderator
  • Queens, NY
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(08-05-2022, 06:46 AM)jackgoldman123 Wrote: Rebel with a Clause by Ellen Jovin
for fans of grammar and usage and humor

Just saw her highlighted on CBS evening news. It looks like a good read for this retired speech and language therapist Sisi

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